Invited Congress Speakers

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES


Dolores Albarracin

Dolores Albarracin

Focus of Lecture: Designing Actionable Interventions to Change Behavior

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 8: Health Psychology

Abstract: In my own work, I have asked a number of questions that I believe are central to our understanding of behavior, attitudes, intentions and goals as a function of personal and situational factors. A question addressed in my research is how much behaviors change and how they change. Specifically, I will discuss how asking new questions in subtle ways shapes our behavior. I will then describe how, ironically, behavior change can depend on people feeling strong enough to seek information that counters prior practices, how external information produces more behavior change when it is actionable, and how changes in behavior align with persuasive communications presented online and in real life.

Bio: Dolores Albarracin is a Professor of Psychology, Business, and Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She was previously a professor at the University of Florida and at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a leader in the fields of communication and persuasion as well as behavior change. She is the lead editor of the Handbook of Attitudes, which has become a source of reference with national and international reach. She has published over 130 journal articles and book chapters in the premier outlets of the fields of psychology and allied sciences. She is a fellow of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. She is currently chief editor of Psychological Bulletin. Her research addresses the following questions:
1. How can we persuade others to engage in socially beneficial behaviors? Under what conditions do changes in attitudes predict behavior? How do attitudes change over time, and what role does memory play (e.g. sleeper effects)? When do we seek out information that is likely to confirm vs. challenge prior attitudes? What is the durability of misinformation, and how can we counter misconceptions, “fake news”, and conspiracy theories?
2. How is action structured and socially conditioned? Do action goals promote changes in attitudes and behavioral routines? Do people engage in behavior for the sake of being active, and what are the potential self-regulatory consequences of this tendency? Do these tendencies vary across cultures? How can this theorizing be used to change multiple risky behaviors?
3. How can we use the psychology of social cognition, attitudes, and motivation for health promotion? What types of campaigns and interventions work for different groups? How can we use social media to mobilize communities to shape their environments and promote health?

Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Alfred Allan

Alfred Allan

Focus of Lecture: The ethical responsibilities of researchers, reviewers and editors working in the psychology and law field

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Affiliation: Edith Cowan University, Australia


Jocelyn J. Bélanger

Jocelyn J. Bélanger

Focus of Lecture: The Psychology of Self-Sacrifice

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Extremism & Terrorism; Sport & Exercise

Abstract: We are all preoccupied by the coming of death, the moment when the matter that constitutes our bodies stops functioning. Suicide bombers unsettle this firmly established belief by trampling on the fundamental notion of self-preservation. But how do they willingly walk into the jaws of death? In this talk, I will review recent progress related to the psychology of self-sacrifice. I begin by defining what self-sacrifice is as an object of study and how it is conceptualized and measured as an individual difference. The notion of self-sacrifice will then be situated among other related constructs to emphasize its unique contribution to psychological science. Once its nomological network has been delimited, I discuss several motivational components relevant to self-sacrifice using the 3N model of radicalization (Kruglanski et al., 2014b; Webber & Kruglanski, 2016) which postulates that extremism happens as a result of three elements coming together: individuals’ Needs, Network, and Narrative. Lastly, I discuss how the power of the 3Ns can also be harnessed for peace building and conciliation.

Bio: Jocelyn J. Bélanger is a professor of psychology at New York University Abu Dhabi. He earned his master's degree and doctorate in Social Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. His research focuses on human judgment, belief formation, and the psychology of terrorism. This interdisciplinary topic has led him to collaborate on several international large-scale projects with the National Consortium for Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), examining the motivational underpinnings of radicalization and deradicalization among terrorists located in the Middle-East and South-East Asia. In March 2015, he was appointed by the City of Montreal to establish the first deradicalization center in North America to tackle homegrown terrorism (CPRLV). Dr Bélanger is the recipient of several awards such as the APA Dissertation Research Award and the Guy Bégin Award for the Best Research Paper in Social Psychology. He is also the author of numerous scientific articles published in top-tier journals of his discipline including American Psychologist, Psychological Review, and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. His research is funded by the Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada as well as the US Department of Homeland Security.

Affiliation: New York University, Abu Dhabi


Guillermo Bernal

Guillermo Bernal

Focus of Lecture: Toward a science of cultural adaptations of psychotherapy

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Affiliation: Albizu University – San Juan & Miami Campus


James Bray

James Bray

Focus of Lecture: International Perspectives on Integrated Health Care

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Professional Psychology

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Bio: James H. Bray, PhD is Professor and Chair of Psychology at the University of Texas San Antonio. He was previously an Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine and Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He was the 2009 President of the American Psychological Association. His presidential themes were the Future of Psychology Practice and Science and Psychology’s Contribution to Ending Homelessness. He is also president of the Division of Professional Practice of the International Association of Applied Psychology. Dr. Bray’s NIH funded research focuses on adolescent substance use, divorce, remarriage and stepfamilies. He has published over 200 articles in major journal and books. He was the director of a federal HRSA faculty development program for physicians and was the director of the SAMSHA funded project on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) project. He is a pioneer in collaborative healthcare and primary care psychology. He has presented his work in 20 countries.

Affiliation: Professor and Chair of Psychology at the University of Texas San Antonio.


Charles P. Chen

Charles P. Chen

Focus of Lecture: Enriching Career Psychology with Positive Compromise

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Counselling

Abstract: Vocational wellness comprises an integral and critical part of the total wellbeing and mental health of human beings, given the fact that issues of worklife and other aspects of personal and social life experiences are intertwined. With a central focus on enhancing individuals’ vocational wellbeing, the essential role and function of career psychology aim to help people generate insights and find more effective ways to take control of their career destination, managing and improving their quality of life in a highly competitive and uncertain world of work. To this end, this keynote address introduces the emerging model of Positive Compromise (PC) in career psychology. The PC model provides both a theoretical framework and a practical guide for scholars, researchers, and practitioners in the realm of vocational and career psychology broadly defined, helping people to be creative and proactive in career management. The central premise is that in light of uncertainty a person often has to give up something less feasible and achievable in order to accomplish career goals and projects that are more practical and obtainable. As a result, compromise becomes an inevitable vital construct in achieving a healthier and more constructive state of vocational being. To expand on the theoretical notion of compromise in the career literature, this address elaborates on the rationale and key tenets of the positive compromise framework, leading to reconceptualizing the meaning of compromise in vocational and career psychology. Alongside evidence from empirical research, the positive compromise framework provides an optimal alternative for career management and construction. Implications for career counselling interventions are illustrated.

In doing so, this address attempts to achieve three learning objectives. First, understand the value of existing theories. Second, see the great potential and meaningfulness of theoretical development in the field. Third, build a pivotal link between theory, research, and practice.

Bio: Charles P. Chen, PhD, is Professor of Counselling Psychology and a Canada Research Chair at the University of Toronto (UofT). He is a Distinguished Honorary Professor and Guest Chair Professor at more than 10 major universities around the world. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, a noted social scientist in Canadian Who’s Who and Who’s Who in the World, and an award-winning professor for Excellence in Graduate Teaching at UofT.

Charles is a keynote/plenary speaker and regular presenter at conferences, and a distinguished guest speaker in various academic and professional contexts around the world for more than 170 times/sessions. He is also a featured expert in news media. His works include 6 scholarly/research books, 10 book chapters, and over 50 refereed journal articles. His book “Career Endeavour (Ashgate, 2006)” received the best counselling book award in Canada. According to Google Scholar, Charles is one of the Top 9 most cited authors in literature regarding postmodern constructivist and constructionist studies within the realm of vocational and career psychology.

Affiliation:Professor
Canada Research Chair
Counselling and Clinical Psychology Program
Department of Applied Psychology & Human Development
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
University of Toronto


Fanny M Cheung

Fanny M. Cheung

Focus of Lecture: Cultural perspectives in personality assessment

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: Assessing personality across cultures has highlighted to need for incorporating emic perspectives in assessment. Current personality practices are dominated by western theories and measures which affect the cross-cultural validity of personality assessment. The combined emic-etic approach can fill important gaps in understanding personality from a local perspective while providing the framework for cross-cultural comparison. Research on the Cross-cultural (Chinese) Personality Assessment Inventory illustrates the considerations and procedures for developing an indigenous personality measure using the combined emic-etic approach. Further research confirms the incremental validity of emic dimensions of personality. Other international initiatives using the combined emic-etic approach will also be introduced.

Bio: Fanny Cheung received her BA from the University of California at Berkeley and her PhD from the University of Minnesota. She is currently Vice-President (Research) and Choh-ming Li Professor of Psychology at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is Past-President of the ITC (2012-14) and a Fellow of APA and APS.

Highly regarded for her research in cross-cultural personality assessment, Fanny is the translator of the Chinese version of the MMPI, MMPI-2 and MMPI-A, and author of an indigenous personality measure for the Chinese cultural context, the Chinese Personality Assessment Inventory, which was later renamed the Cross-cultural Personality Assessment Inventory (CPAI-2). Her research has raised awareness on the issues of test translation, equivalence and cultural relevance. The combined emic-etic method she adopted in developing the CPAI has raised awareness on cultural perspectives in mainstream psychology, and has inspired the development of other indigenous assessment measures. Fanny’s recent publications include the 2011 article “Toward a new approach to the study of personality in culture” with Van de Vijver and Leong in American Psychologist (pp. 593-603), a co-edited book in 2016 with Leong, F., Gregoire, J. Cheung, F. M. Geisinger, K., Bartram, D., and Iliescu, D. The ITC International Handbook of Testing and Assessment by Oxford University Press (which received the Ursula Gielen Global Psychology Book Award from the Division of International Psychology of the American Psychological Association , 2017) and a co-authored chapter with Fan, W. Q., & Cheung, S. F. on “Indigenous measurement of personality in Asia” in A. T. Church (Ed.). The Praeger Handbook of Personality across Cultures, Vol. I. Trait Psychology across Cultures (pp. 105-135) by ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

Other than her research in cross-cultural personality assessment and Chinese mental health, Fanny has pioneered gender research in Chinese societies. She has served as the Founding Chairperson of the Equal Opportunities Commission in Hong Kong. Her research on gender issues includes violence against women, women leadership and gender equality. She has combined scholarship with public service and advocacy.

Fanny’s psychology awards include APA Presidential Citation in 2004, APA Division 52 Distinguished International Psychologist Award in 2005, and the 2012 American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology and the 2014 IAAP Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to International Advancement of Applied Psychology.

Fanny has served IAAP actively since the 1990, first as President of Division of Clinical and Community Psychology (1990 – 94), and later as Member of the Board of Directors (2006 – 2018). She has served as a Convenor of the Asian outreach task force, and as a member of the Task Force on Membership and the Working Group on Terms of Service. She is a co-editor of the IAAP Handbook of Applied Psychology (2011) by Wiley-Blackwell.

Affiliation: The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Helen Christensen

Helen Christensen

Focus of Lecture: TBC

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical Psychology Section

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Bio: Professor Christensen is an international leader in the use of technology to deliver evidence-based psychological therapies to communities and individuals who suffer from anxiety or depression, or who are at risk of suicide. Professor Christensen leads the Digital Dog team that is investigating novel methods for detecting mental health risk via social media, and developing novel interventions for mental health treatment. The Digital Dog team focuses on interventions to target depression, suicide risk and to enhance wellbeing. Professor Christensen also leads the LifeSpan trial that will investigate a novel systems approach to suicide prevention in NSW. This trial aims to reduce the number of suicide deaths by 21% and the number of suicide attempts by 30%.

Professor Christensen's research also encompasses prevention of mental health problems in young people through school-based research programs. These programs are aimed at prevention of depression and suicide risk through eMental Health interventions. Professor Christensen has recently published the novel approach to preventing the onset of depression through targeting insomnia with the SHUTi program.

Christensen, H., Batterham, P. J., & Gosling, J. A. (2016). Effectiveness of an online insomnia program (SHUTi) for prevention of depressive episodes (the GoodNight Study): a randomised controlled trial (vol 3, pg 333, 2016). LANCET PSYCHIATRY, 3(4), 320-320.

Affiliation: Scientia Professor Helen Christensen is Director and Chief Scientist at the Black Dog Institute and a Professor of Mental Health at UNSW


German Antonio Gutierrez Dominguez

German Antonio Gutierrez Dominguez

Focus of Lecture: Comparative psychology of sexual behavior: From basic processes to applied settings

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical; Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

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Affiliation: National University of Colombia


Maria Eduarda Duarte

Maria Eduarda Duarte

Focus of Lecture: “Work and days”: the freedoms and the restraints to promote a decent life

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical; Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

Abstract: The nature of work nowadays presents a wealth of challenges for career counseling, including for this exercise the recognition of the plurality of knowledge-based cultures and contexts. The opening section is centered on the idea that cultural or contextual issues represent pieces which are integral to the puzzle of career counseling, rather than being something that can be isolated. Through this perspective, career counseling processes are understood as being dependent on specific cultural and contextual aspects that must be taken into consideration throughout the entire counseling process. A second purpose is to evaluate the gaps found between theory and practice effectiveness. To close these gaps, i.e., connecting science to solutions, a more determined approach to the strategic impact of counseling must be taken, expanding focus out from individual research into a broader base, therein incorporating solutions that highlight indigenous perspectives conceptualized reflexively and dialogically.

Bio: M. Eduarda Duarte is Full Professor at the University of Lisbon, Faculty of Psychology, where she directs the Master Course in Psychology of Human Resources, Work, and Organizations. Her professional interests include career psychology theory and research, with special emphasis on issues relevant to adults and the world of work. She is research director of Career Guidance and Development of Human Resources Services. Her publications and presentations have encompassed topics on adult’s career problems, testing and assessment, and counselling process. She is since 2005 Chair of the Portuguese Psychological Society; she also served on editorial boards for some Portuguese, European, and Iberia-American journals. She was the Director of the National Institute of Guidance (2009-2014). She is President of Counselling Division, IAAP. She is Fellow Award – IAAP (2014), and ESVDC award 2015. She is also National Defence Adviser, since 2006.

Affiliation: University of Lisbon, Portugal


Andrew Elliot

Andrew Elliot

Focus of Lecture: Competition and achievement outcomes: A hierarchical motivational analysis

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: In my talk, I will provide a conceptual overview of the hierarchical model of achievement motivation, and I will apply this model to competitive striving. The hierarchical model distinguishes between two aspects of motivation – energization (general competitive desire) and direction (pursuit of specific performance-based goals) – and integrates them together into an overarching model of competition. I will present a series of studies showing that competitive desires lead to both performance-approach and performance-avoidance goal pursuit, and that these two goals have an opposite impact on achievement-relevant outcomes. I will end my talk by discussing implications for real-world achievement contexts.

Bio: Andrew J. Elliot is Professor of Psychology at the University of Rochester. He has held Visiting Professor positions at Cambridge University, King Abdulaziz University, Oxford University, and the University of Munich, and has been a Visiting Fellow at Churchill College (Cambridge) and Jesus College (Oxford). He received his Ph. D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1994. His research focuses on achievement motivation and approach-avoidance motivation. He is currently editor of Advances in Motivation Science, and has over 200 scholarly publications. He has received multiple awards for his teaching and research contributions to both educational and social-personality psychology. He has given keynote or university addresses in more than 20 different countries, and his lab regularly hosts professors, post-docs, and graduate students from around the globe.

Affiliation: University of Rochester


Martin Euwema

Martin Euwema

Focus of Lecture: TBC

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Affiliation: KU Leuven, Belgian


Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros

Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros

Focus of Lecture: Longevity and Behavior

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract:The exponential increase in life expectancy since the mid-nineteenth century and the continuation of this trend has been explained through the socio-economic, educational and technological developments. Explanations for this unexpected phenomena favour environmental above genetic reasons. Thus, bio-demographers pointed out that population analyses "indicate that genetic differences between individuals account for 20-25% of variation in lifespan…which, in effect, allows us to estimate that 75-80% are attributable to environmental conditions” without specify in what extent behaviours is an important factor of the environment. This is also supported when examining the inter-individual and generational differences in intellectual functioning throughout the twentieth century, the cross-sectional or the longitudinal studies in which the drop-out effect is examined, as well as the studies of cognitive epidemiology. Moreover, WHO pointed out that behavioural life styles as well as personal psychological conditions such as copying with stress, personality traits (such as consciousness), emotional stability and positivity and psychosocial conditions are potentially determinant of Active Aging. Thus, a transactional socio-cognitive perspective it is plausible to see behavioural factors being responsible to some extent for longevity and survival. This presentation will deal with all empirical evidence from cross-sectional, longitudinal, cohort and experimental research supportive that behavioural conditions are intervening factors of longevity.

Bio: Prof. Dra. Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros García
Emeritus Professor at the Universidad Autonoma of Madrid. Ph.D. in Political Science and Sociology. Clinical Psychologist. Author or Editor of 29 books (among them the Encyclopedia of Psychological Assessment, Sage; Active Aging. Contribution of Psychology, Hogrefe; Cambridge Handbook of Successful Aging) and more than 300 articles published in high impact Journals or Edited books and Encyclopedias of Psychology and Gerontology. Program evaluator of National and International Organizations (UNESCO, European Union). Served as Expert: the United Nation and UNECE (2001-2008) and for the WHO for Active Ageing. A Policy Framework (2001-02). Founder and Editor-in Chief of the European Journal of Psychological Assessment (1985-2008); Associated Editor of the European Journal of Ageing and of the European Psychologist journal. Founder and first President (1992-1998) of the European Association of Psychological Assessment (EAPA). Founder and First Chair of the Task Force of GeroPsychology (2003-2009) of the European Federation of Psychologists Associations (EFPA); Member of the Board of Director of the International Association of Apply Psychology (IAAP, 1990-2005) and President of the Psychological Assessment Division (1994-2002) and of Division 7-Social Gerontology (2004-08) and Member of the Spanish Academy of Psychology (since 2015). She has received several Awards and Prizes, among others: the Aristotle Prize (EFPA, 2005), IAAP-Distinguished Contribution-IAAP (2006), Outstanding Contribution from EAPA (2009), Huarte de San Juan Award (COP-CyL, 2007) https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rocio_Fernandez-Ballesteros

Affiliation: Autonoma University of Madrid


Ian Freckelton

Ian Freckelton

Focus of Lecture: Scholarly Misconduct: Challenges for Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 10: Psychology and Law

Abstract: Controversies in relation to the conduct of research periodically afflict all of the sciences. However, there are objective signs that the problems in relation to scholarly misconduct are deepening in a troubling way. Retractions in scholarly journals, including those which are highly regarded, are becoming more common; high profile scandals afflict disciplines and sub-disciplines alike, including within psychology; and arguments are proliferating about how most effectively ethical standards can be improved and investigations into allegations of misconduct can be undertaken with fairness to all. Psychology has not been prominent in the phenomenon of research misconduct, the conduct of Professor Stapel in The Netherlands providing very important opportunities for the learning of lessons - by bothe the profession and by psychologists generally. However, there is no shortage of other cases which have relevance for psychologists in avoiding temptations for short-cuts, in ensuring ethical collaboration, and for the fostering of a culture of ethical propriety. A series of international issues, some of which have even involved the preferring of criminal charges, will be scrutinised and an attempt made to reflect upon how psychology can learn from the scandals and crises of the past decade to build a more robust culture of research rigour and integrity.

Bio: Ian Freckelton is a Queen's Counsel in full time practice in Australia, a judge of the Supreme Court of Nauru, and a Professorial Fellow of Law and Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne. He is a former Professor of Forensic Psychology at Monash University, and is the Editor-in-Chief of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law and the Editor of the Journal of Law and Medicine. He is the author and editor of more than 40 books and over 600 peer reviewed articles and chapters of books. Ian is a member of Victoria's Mental Health Tribunal and of its Coronial Council. He is an elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia, the Australian Academy of Law, and the Australasian College of Legal Medicine. He is a former President of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law and was for many years the lawyer member of Victoria's Psychologists Registration Board. Among Ian's most recent books are Scholarly Misconduct (OUP, 2016), Tensions and Traumas in Health Law (Federation Press, 2017) and Expert Evidence (Thomson Reuters, 2018).

Affiliation: Barristers’ Clerk Howells


Tommy Garling

Tommy Gärling

Focus of Lecture: Urban Travel: Interfaces with Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

Abstract: Why do people travel? How do people travel? How are people influenced by travel? After briefly addressing the first two questions, I present research investigating how psychological well-being is influenced by daily travel in urban areas. An overview is first given of different conceptualizations of psychological well-being as cognitive judgements of satisfaction and experienced emotions, and their possible relation to travel. This is followed by a presentation of the methods that have been developed to measure travel-related well-being including self-report measures of attitude towards travel obtained before travel, measures of mood and emotions obtained during travel, and measures of mood and satisfaction obtained after travel. Urban travel is a frequent activity taking up much of the time of the daily lives of many people, in particular those in the work force and students commuting to their work places. It may therefore be appropriate to consider satisfaction with travel as a domain satisfaction that to some degree like other domain satisfactions influences overall life satisfaction. The results are presented of several surveys using different methods to show how satisfaction with travel and indirectly overall life satisfaction are influenced in different segments of the population by travel time, travel mode, in-vehicle activities, and interruptions. Different interpretations of these findings are discussed to give a coherent picture of the role of psychological factors in urban travel.

Bio: Research Council of Humanities and Social Sciences and Director of the Transportation Research Unit at Umeå University, he was in 1992 appointed as Professor of Psychology at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg. He held this position until 2008 when he became Emeritus Professor.

Tommy Gärling has conducted research in five main areas, judgment and decision making (basic research on different topics related to evaluations and emotions), environmental psychology (spatial cognition; childhood accidents; residential choice; restorative effects of natural environments; pro-environmental values, attitudes and behavior), econonomic psychology and behavioral economics/finance (money perception and perceived inflation; sustainable investments and values; herding in stock markets; effects of bonus systems on investors´ short-sightedness; consumers’ trust in and satisfaction with financial institutions), travel behavior (computational process models of interrelated activity/travel choice; evaluation of transport policies to reduce car use; attractiveness of public transport; how travel influences satisfaction and emotions ), and consumer behavior, marketing and retailing (replacement purchases of cars; attractiveness and accessibility of stores for grocery shopping).

Tommy Gärling is the editor or co-editor of 11 books and has authored and co-authored more than 250 papers published in peer-reviewed international journals in psychology, applied psychology (environmental and economic psychology), transportation, geography and planning, economics, and consumer behavior, close to 100 book chapters including five invited chapters for handbooks of environmental psychology, economic psychology, consumer behavior, and transportation, and a large number of other publications in both English and Swedish.

Tommy Gärling was member of the scientific committee of the international congress of psychology in Stockholm 2000 being responsible for The Dag Hammarskjöld memorial symposia on diplomacy and psychology with participation of UN deputy director Jan Eliasson and a large number of top-level psychology researchers. In 2002 he co-organized one of the biannual conferences of the European Association of Decision Making. He has also co-organized another five international conferences on various topics and has convened more than 10 invited symposia. He has been invited keynote speaker at seven international conferences and presented his research more than 300 times at international conferences.

From 1998 to 2002 Tommy Gärling was president of the environmental psychology division of the International Association of Applied Psychology and in 2014 he became fellow of the association. He is a former member of the board of the International Association of Travel Behavior Research. He has been an associate editor of Journal of Economic Psychology and member of the editorial boards of Journal of Environmental Psychology, Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly Journal of Socio-Economics), Spatial Cognition & Computation, and Transportation.

Affiliation: Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden


Nicola Gavey

Nicola Gavey

Focus of Lecture: TBC

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Sponsoring Division/Section: SWAP (Section on Women and Psychology)

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Affiliation: The University of Auckland, New Zealand


Henk Geertsema

Henk Geertsema

Focus of Lecture: Ethics and some challenges for Psychology

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Polli Hagenaars

Polli Hagenaars

Focus of Lecture: Psychology, a human rights profession - 1948-2018, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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Bio: Polli Hagenaars is a practicing healthcare psychologist in Amsterdam and a trainer in diversity and non-discrimination. She is convener of the Board Human Rights & Psychology of the European Federation of Psychologists’ Associations (EFPA). In her view Inclusion, next to Dignity and Freedom, is a core principle in human rights. Social exclusion affects the identity of people in marginalized groups: a negative self concept could be internalised, self-esteem might be damaged, with the effect of stress reactions, a restricted behaviour repertoire and even health problems. Identity acts as a ‘double edged sword’ in bringing about social inclusion. For professionals to be able to assist in empowering, terms of categories are needed, which often reinforce the everyday experiences of people and have the effect of confirming the minority status. This process of ‘othering’ doubles social exclusion. In order to improve rights fulfilment, right holders need to be given the full potential as change makers and to be able to use the resilience and capabilities they possess. At the same time, involving society in this process is needed. Empowerment only develops when people act together in changing existing power relationships and establishing a ‘new inclusive we’. Only then, people will get the freedom to choose their own social and personal identity.

Affiliation: Convener, Board Human Rights & Psychology of the European Federation of Psychologists’ Associations (EFPA)


Stevan E. Hobfoll

Stevan E. Hobfoll

Focus of Lecture: Terrorism Threat: Trauma, Resilience and Political Decay

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical, Community

Abstract: In the face of terrorism, rocket attacks and war, people react with a range of emotions from deeply experienced distress to an amazing level of resilience. At the same time, the politics of fear can be seen as producing a shift to a more right wing, militant stance, especially in those who begin with a more right wing approach to politics. The study of stress and trauma has focused on pathological responses, and seldom examined either resilience or political reactivity, despite politics being one way we cope with threat. We examine terrorist attacks and other mass casualty circumstances around the world in light of how to better define resilience, resistance, and recovery, as well as how threat and loss is impacting our political selves. In so doing the epidemiology of resilience, how it might be defined, and how it should be explored in future research is explored. This work is critical for broadening our theoretical understanding of people’s responding to trauma, key to public health intervention, and carries enormous potential for building a Psychology of Human Strength in the face of adversity that has been absent in trauma studies. Our work on the consequences of terrorism, mass conflict and war from the World Trade Center attacks, Israel and Palestine will be presented. This more complex understanding of impact, resilience, and resistance suggests important roles for individual differences in vulnerability and resiliency-related characteristics, as well as the influence of key situational differences in levels of exposure, the chronicity of exposure, and environmental contingencies.

Bio: Dr. Stevan Hobfoll has authored and edited 12 books, including TRAUMATIC STRESS, THE ECOLOGY OF STRESS, STRESS CULTURE AND COMMUNITY, and THE IMPERFECT GUARDIAN (an historical novel set in Eastern Europe at the time of WWI). In addition, he has authored over 250 journal articles, book chapters, and technical reports. He has been a frequent workshop leader on stress, war, and terrorism, stress and health, and organizational stress. He has received over $18 million in research grants on stress. Dr. Hobfoll is currently the Judd and Marjorie Weinberg Presidential Professor and Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences at Rush Medical College in Chicago, joining Rush in 2008. His current research focuses on trauma in zones of conflict and on the connection between stress and biological-health outcomes in women’s lives.

Dr. Hobfoll was a Senior Fellow of the Center for National Security Studies at the University of Haifa, Israel. Formerly at Tel Aviv and Ben Gurion Universities, and an officer in the Israeli Defense Forces, he remains involved with the problem of stress in Israel. Dr. Hobfoll was cited by the Encyclopædia Britannica for his contribution to knowledge and understanding for his Ecology of Stress. He was co-chair of the American Psychological Association Commission on Stress and War during Operation Desert Storm, helping plan for the prevention of prolonged distress among military personnel and their families, a member of the U.S. Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee of the National Biodefense Science Board (NBSB), and a member of APA’s Task Force on Resilience in Response to Terrorism. Dr. Hobfoll published the first randomized clinical trial on the prevention of HIV/AIDS in women. He has been a consultant to several nations, military organizations, and major corporations on problems of stress and health.

Professor Hobfoll has been honored with multiple lifetime achievement awards for work on traumatic stress, and work on stress and health. His work has made a difference in millions of people’s lives around the world, believing that academia must be a beacon of light for the world, not an ivory tower. He was honored by the State of Ohio for implementation of efforts to protect poor women of color from violence and disease in Ohio. His work was selected as a model program by both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control for translation of research to effective intervention in inner-city women’s lives, especially addressing violence and physical health. His work on mass casualty intervention was designated as one of the most influential recent contributions to psychiatry. His 5 principles of mass casualty intervention paper (Hobfoll, Watson, et al., 2007) was selected by the Psychiatry Journal Focus as one of the most influential recent papers in psychiatry. Indeed, this blueprint is the world standard for mass casualty intervention and treatment of refugees throughout the world, adopted by dozens of countries, the World Health Organization and hundreds of NGOs (h-index 74; 35000 citations, 10/17).

Affiliation: The Judd and Marjorie Weinberg Presidential Professor and Chair
Professor of Behavioral Sciences, Medicine, Preventive Medicine & Nursing Science
Department of Behavioral Sciences
Rush University Medical Center


Anita Hubley

Anita Hubley

Focus of Lecture: Missed opportunities in testing and assessment: Consequences, side effects, and response processes

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to highlight two critically important, but often misunderstood and neglected, sources of validity evidence that book-end the measurement process: (a) response processes, and (b) test consequences. A key challenge in measurement involves capturing attributes, observations, or experiences using numbers, with as little error as possible. What are respondents thinking and doing as they respond to our measures? Are they interpreting items in the way that was intended theoretically? Does the response format capture their desired response? Do the mechanisms that underlie what people do, think, or feel when interacting with, and responding to, an item or task match what we would expect theoretically for the construct of interest? How are response processes different from test content as a source of validity evidence? I will discuss what response processes are (and are not), methods for collecting this source of validity evidence, and their role in validation. We not only want to accurately capture attributes, observations, or experiences with our measures, we want the inferences we make from these measures to have impact. We use test scores in research, clinical, and applied settings to understand valued cultural phenomena, build theories, make decisions, or evaluate interventions. Whether the measures we use are high stakes or not, they have implications for individuals, groups, and society. What are the intended consequences and unintended side effects of using measures legitimately in different contexts? What is the impact of consequences on the validity of inferences made from these measures? Response processes and the consequences and side effects of legitimate test use highlight missed opportunities in testing and assessment. It is time for us to pay more attention to the complex interaction of the respondent, the measure, and the context in which we administer, interpret, and use measures.

Bio: Dr. Anita Hubley is a Full Professor in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia (UBC), where she is Coordinator of the Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology program, member of the Counselling Psychology program, and Director of the Adult Development and Psychometrics Lab. She earned her Ph.D. in Psychology in 1995, specializing in human assessment. Dr. Hubley is recognized internationally for her expertise in test development, validity, and psychological and health assessment and measurement across the adult lifespan, including with vulnerable populations. She has published over 95 academic articles and book chapters on these topics, particularly as they relate to neuropsychology, quality of life, depression, age identity, and homelessness. She has also developed several clinical, health, and psychological tests, including the Memory Test for Older Adults, Modified Taylor Complex Figure, and Quality of Life in Homeless and Hard-to-House Individuals measure, to name just a few. She is a former member of the Executive Council of the International Test Commission (ITC) – which provides guidance in testing practices to individuals and organizations around the world, and former Editor of the ITC’s publication "Testing International". Her keynote address is informed by her recently published and co-edited book, "Understanding and Investigating Response Processes in Validation Research", and reflects her work on response processes and consequences of testing as sources of validity evidence.

Affiliation: University of British Columbia


Dragos Iliescu

Dragos Iliescu

Focus of Lecture: On the Equivalence of Measurement Instruments across Languages and Cultures: Between Ignorance and Half-Hearted Acceptance

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: The presentation delves into the realm of test adaptation (or test localization, test indigenization), a scientific and professional activity which now spans the whole realm of the social and behavioural sciences. Adapting tests to various linguistic and cultural contexts is a critical process in today's globalized world and combines knowledge and skills from such domains as psychometrics, cross-cultural psychology and others. Cross-cultural equivalence (invariance) of the adapted form with the original form is the indicator of a valid test adaptation. Such evidence should be provided by any scientific work based on, or including adapted measures. This requirement is however largely ignored in publications, and in many cases is only half-heartedly and incompletely followed. The presentation will discuss various sub-optimal practices and biases resulted from the these practices, as well as recommendations for good practice in this important domain.

Bio: Dragos Iliescu is a Professor of Psychology with the University of Bucharest in Romania. His research interests group around two domains: psychological and educational assessment, tests and testing (with an important cross-cultural component), and applied (I/O) psychology. He has consulted on various international projects related to test adaptation and assessment on all the 5 continents. He is the current President (2016-2018) of the International Test Commission (ITC). Two of his latest publications are The ITC International Handbook of Testing and Assessment (2016, Oxford University Press, co-editor with Frederick Leong, Dave Bartram, Fanny Cheung, Kurt Geisinger) and Adapting Tests in Linguistic and Cultural Situations (2017, Cambridge University Press).

Affiliation: University of Bucharest


Barbel Knauper

Barbel Knauper

Focus of Lecture: Innovations in behavioral weight loss programs

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 8: Health Psychology

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada


Kibeom Lee

Kibeom Lee

Focus of Lecture: The HEXACO Model of Personality Structure: Its Origin and Development

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Industrial/Organizational

Abstract: Since the 1990s, many psychological investigations have adopted the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of Personality, which posits that personality variation can be summarized by five independent dimensions. Recently, however, widespread evidence has emerged in favor of an alternative, six-dimensional model of personality. In this presentation, I will review this new evidence involving the results from lexical studies of personality structure. The striking feature of those results has been the consistent emergence of a common set of six—not just five—personality factors (see Ashton et al., 2004; Lee & Ashton, 2008). This new six-dimensional framework, named the HEXACO Model of Personality, contains factors known as Honesty-Humility (H), Emotionality (E), eXtraversion (X), Agreeableness (A), Conscientiousness (C), and Openness to Experience (O). One of the most distinguishing characteristics of the model is the addition of Honesty-Humility (also known as the H factor), a factor whose defining content is not fully represented within the FFM. I will discuss some of the empirical findings highlighting the importance of the H factor in predicting socially important criteria and in explaining some psychological phenomena.

Bio: Kibeom Lee is Professor of Psychology at the University of Calgary. Originally from Seoul, South Korea, he was previously Assistant Professor at the University of Western Australia. Kibeom obtained his Ph.D. degree from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario. He has published over 90 peer-reviewed articles in the major outlets of personality psychology as well as of industrial/organizational psychology. Kibeom and his colleague, Michael Ashton, are widely known in personality psychology for their development of the HEXACO model of personality structure. Based on their works, Kibeom and Mike Ashton wrote a book for general audiences titled “The H Factor of Personality: Why Some People Are Manipulative, Self-Entitled, Materialistic, and Exploitive—And Why It Matters for Everyone”.

Affiliation: University of Calgary


Frederick Leong

Frederick Leong

Focus of Lecture: Diversifying Psychotherapy: Challenges and Benefits

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation:


Sonia Lippke

Sonia Lippke

Focus of Lecture: Health psychology in times of globalization and migration: state of the science and future directions

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: We need innovative approaches for promoting health and wellbeing in times of high migration trends, increasing globalization and digitalization as well as challenges due to cultural diversity. Accordingly this lecture will give an overview. For instance, beside the "healthy migration effect", migrants typically show poorer health than the native population. While people respond differently to disstress, many people need strategies to cope with challenges. This is impacted by multiple health behavior change (MHBC), e.g., nutrition and physical activity and their interrelations. Only a few comprehensive theories exist, however, one such theory is the Compensatory Carry-Over Action Model (CCAM). The few studies testing the CCAM or selected aspects of it including the psychological mechanisms responsible for MHBC in individuals with a migration background, help to improve health promotion in times of globalization and migration. Digital research methods (e.g., online questionnaires, computer assisted telephone interviews as specialized web applications) are state-of-the-science approaches because they allow administering international, cross-cultural studies and health interventions in different languages, regions and contexts. At the same time, risks related to digital devices should be taken into account such as privacy, data security and social media dependency. This lecture will also review health behavior change techniques relevant for working with divers target groups to meet their specific needs and to apply tailored interventions. Examples from doctor patient communication, training students in self-regulation and also professional skills, as well as diversity management in globally-operating companies will be reviewed with the perspective from health psychology. The aim of this overview is an improved understanding of MHBC, theory refinement and evidence-based health promotion interventions to help better to cope with migration related challenges. Future directions will be highlighted and discussed with the audience in an interactive format.

Bio: Researcher unique identifiers: orcid.org/0000-0002-8272-0399
ResearcherID B-7564-2014 researchgate.net/profile/Sonia_Lippke
• EDUCATION:
2004 PhD; Department of Psychology; Health Psychology Unit, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany; Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Ralf Schwarzer
2000 Dipl.-Psych. (Master equivalent); Department of Psychology; Health Psychology Unit, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany
• CURRENT POSITIONS:
Since 2016 Full Professor of Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine; Jacobs University Bremen/Germany
Since 2011 Faculty Member; Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS), Bremen/Germany
• PREVIOUS POSITIONS:
2011-2016 Associate Professor of Health Psychology; Jacobs University Bremen/Germany
2010–2011 Associate Professor (UHD); Maastricht University/Netherlands
2004–2010 Assistant professor (C1); Freie Universität Berlin/Germany
2004–2005 Postdoctoral fellow and Postdoctoral research associate; Centre for Health Promotion Studies, University of Alberta/Canada
• CURRENT INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES (selected):
7/2014–today President elect of Div. 8: Health Psychology/Int. Association of Applied Psychology
10/2013–today Elected Faculty Speaker, Jacobs University/Germany
• COMMISSIONS OF TRUST (selected):
2015–today Associate Editor, Applied Psychology: Health and Wellbeing/Germany
2013–today Editorial Board, Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal/Germany
2012–today Review Board, American Journal of Health Behavior/USA

Affiliation: Professor of Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine;
Department of Psychology & Methods/ Focus Area Diversity;
Jacobs Center on Lifelong Learning and Institutional Development (JCLL) & Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS);
Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany


Kobus Maree

Kobus Maree

Focus of Lecture: Contextualizing and Decontextualizing Different Approaches to Career Counselling for Use in Diverse Social Contexts: Some Research Findings

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Div 16: Counselling

Abstract: Much has been written about the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on theory and practice developed in Europe and North America in particular to guide developing country theorists’, researchers’, and practitioners’ individual and collective responses to fundamental changes in the occupational world (driven by what has become known as Work 4.0 or Industry 4.0 (the 4th Industrial Revolution). While some argue in favour of such “importation” of theory and practice, others stress the need to research, promote, develop, and implement indigenous theory and practice in local contexts. Increasing calls to “decolonize” education and psychology in Africa have lent support to this view. Constructivist approaches, especially, have lately come under fire for allegedly being out of step with collectivist mindsets and contexts. Most researchers, theorists, and practitioners, however, appear to support a “middle of the road” approach, that is, using what is available while simultaneously developing indigenous theory and practice.
In this paper, I advocate use of the constructivist notions of constructing, deconstructing, reconstructing, and co-constructing to guide career counsellors’ individual and collective global responses to changes in the occupational world. More particularly, I make a case for contextualizing, decontextualizing, recontextualizng, and co-contextualizing career counselling theory and practice to accommodate different cultures and social contexts in an attempt to devise career counselling theory and interventions that can help alleviate poverty and promote sustainable decent work in resource-scarce contexts in particular.
In the second part of the presentation, I report on the findings of a number of recent research projects conducted in a severely disadvantaged (third world) area of South Africa, a country comprising developed and underdeveloped, first world and third world contexts adjacent to each other and intricately interwoven, yet vastly different in terms of available resources. Interesting results were obtained using an integrated, qualitative+quantitative approach (contextualized and decontextualized to heighten its value in the first world and third world contexts referred to above) to collect the personal data. The results showed that people’s often desperate poverty should not be considered the sole or “major” problem. Of grave concern also is that they do not have the opportunity to find meaning and purpose in their work-lives.

Bio: Prof. Kobus Maree (DEd (Career Counselling); PhD (Learning Facilitation in Mathematics); DPhil (Psychology)) is a full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Pretoria. His main research interests are career construction (counselling), life design (counselling), emotional-social intelligence and social responsibility, and learning facilitation in mathematics. He links research results to appropriate career choices and to life designing.
Past editor of a number of scholarly journals, for instance, the South African Journal of Psychology, managing editor of Gifted Education International, regional editor for Southern Africa: Early Child Development and Care, and a member of several national and international bodies, including the Society for Vocational Psychology (SVP) (USA), the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) (USA), the Psychology Association of South Africa (SA), and the Association of Science of South Africa (ASSAf). In 2009, he was awarded the Stals Prize of the South African Academy of Science and Arts for exceptional research and contributions to Psychology. In June 2014, he was awarded the Stals prize for exceptional research and contributions to Education, and he received the Psychological Society of South Africa’s (PsySSA) Award for Excellence in Science during the 20th South African Psychology Congress in September 2014. Prof. Maree was awarded Honorary Membership of the Golden Key International Honour Society for exceptional academic achievements, leadership skills and community involvement in October 2014. He was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal for Teaching and Learning from the University of Pretoria in 2010 and has been nominated successfully as an Exceptional Academic Achiever on four consecutive occasions (2003-2016). He has a B1 rating from the National Research Foundation (the highest rating in the history of the faculty).
Prof. Maree has authored or co­authored 100+ peer­reviewed articles and 55 books/ book chapters on career counselling, research and related topics since 2009. In the same period, he supervised 33 doctoral theses and Master’s dissertations and read keynote papers at 20+ international and at 20+ national conferences. He has also presented numerous invited workshops at conferences across the world on a) integrating qualitative and quantitative approaches in career counselling, and b) the art and science of writing scholarly articles. Over the past seven years, he has spent a lot of time abroad. For instance, he accepted invitations to spend time as a visiting professor at various universities where he presented workshops on e.g. contemporary developments in career counselling, article writing, and research methodology. Prof. Maree was awarded a fellowship of the IAAP at the ICAP Conference in Paris in July, 2014. In September 2017, he was awarded PsySSA’s Fellow Award (Lifetime Award in recognition of a person who has made exceptional contributions to Psychology in her/his life) at the PAPU Congress in Durban, South Africa.

Affiliation: University of Pretoria, South Africa


Herb Marsh

Herb Marsh

Focus of Lecture: Academic Self-concept: Cornerstone of a Revolution in the Positive Educational Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: There is a positive psychology revolution sweeping educational psychology, one that emphasizes how healthy, normal and exceptional students can get the most from education. Positive self-beliefs are at the heart of this revolution. My self-concept research programme represents a substantive-quantitative synergy, applying and developing new quantitative approaches to better address substantive issues with important policy implications. Self-concept is a multidimensional hierarchical construct with highly differentiated components such as academic, social, physical and emotional self-concepts that cannot be understood from a unidimensional approach that considers only self-esteem. Particularly in educational psychology, self-concept enhancement is a major goal. Self-concept is also an important mediating factor that facilitates the attainment of other desirable outcomes. In education, for example, a positive academic self-concept is both a highly desirable goal and a means of facilitating subsequent academic accomplishments. However, the benefits of feeling positively about oneself in relation to choice, planning, persistence and subsequent accomplishments, transcend traditional disciplinary and cultural barriers. Perhaps more than any other areas within educational psychology, there is extensive international cross-cultural tests and support for the generalizability of the major theoretical models in the discipline. My purpose here is to provide an overview of my self-concept research in which I address diverse theoretical and methodological issues with practical implications for research, policy and practice such as:

  • Does a positive self-concept ‘cause’ better school performance or is it the other way around?
  • Why do self-concepts decline for:
    • gifted students who attend selective schools?
    • learning disabled students in regular classrooms?
  • Are multiple dimensions of self-concept more distinct than multiple intelligences?
  • Why do people think of themselves as ‘math’ persons or ‘verbal’ persons?
  • Does a positive physical self-concept lead to health-related physical activity?
  • Do self-concept models hold up cross-nationally and cross-culturally?
  • Positive Effects of Repeating a Year in School on Academic Self-concept and Achievment
  • How does country-average achievement influence academic self-concept
  • .

Bio: Professor Herb Marsh (BA Hons, Indiana Univ; MA, PhD, UCLA; DSc UWestSyd; HonDoc, Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munich) Professor of Psychology,Institute for Positive Psychology and Education at the Australian Catholic University, and Emeritus Professor at Oxford University. He is an “ISI highly cited researcher” (http://isihighlycited.com/) with 700+ publications, 88,000+citations and an H-index = 146 in Google Scholar (Google Citations), co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. European Commission study of citations based on the Google scholar H-Index, across all science, social science and humanity disciplines he was ranked first among all Australian researchers, and 228th in the world (http://www.webometrics.info/en/node/58/). He founded and has served as Director for 20 years of the SELF Research Centre that has 500+ members and satellite centres at leading Universities around the world. He coined the phrase substantive-methodological research synergy which underpins his research efforts. In addition to his methodological focus on structural equation models, factor analysis, and multilevel modelling, his major substantive interests include self-concept and motivational constructs; evaluations of teaching/educational effectiveness; developmental psychology; sports psychology; the peer review process; gender differences; peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Affiliation: Institute For Positive Psychology & Education, Australian Catholic University; University of Oxford


Fathali Moghaddam

Fathali Moghaddam

Focus of Lecture: Understanding and Solving Mutual Radicalization: When Groups and Nations Drive Each Other to Extremes

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical, Community

Abstract: The process of Mutual Radicalization (MR) comes about when the actions of one group triggers more extreme responses in a second group, and this triggers further radicalization in the first group, so the two groups take increasingly extreme positions opposing one another, reacting against real or imagined threats, moving further and further apart. Mutual radicalization eventually leads to pathological hatred, so that ‘your pain, my gain’ becomes the guide for the actions of both groups. Using case-studies of major nations (e.g., the U.S.A and Iran; North and South Korea; China and Japan) and groups (e.g., The National Rifle Association and gun regulation groups; Trump and Sanders; ‘gridlockracy’ on the Hill), I present a dynamic model of mutual radicalization. The three major parts of this model apply to all groups and nations, but the steps within each part do not apply to all cases. In the final section, I provide a number of guidelines for preventing mutual radicalization, as well as resolving mutual radicalization after it has developed and extremism is normative in one or both groups.

Bio: Fathali M. Moghaddam is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science at Georgetown University, Washington D.C., U.S.A. From 2008-2014 he was Director, Conflict Resolution Program, Department of Government, Georgetown University. In 2014 he became Editor-in-Chief, Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology (published by the American Psychological Association). Dr. Moghaddam was born in Iran, educated from an early age in England, and returned to Iran with the revolution in 1979. He was researching and teaching in Iran during the hostage taking crisis and the first three years of the Iran-Iraq War. After work for the United Nations, he researched and taught at McGill University, Canada, from 1984, before moving to Georgetown in 1990. He has conducted experimental and field research in numerous cultural contexts and published extensively on the psychology of conflict, terrorism, democracy, dictatorship, political plasticity, and mutual radicalization. His most recent books are ‘The Psychology of dictatorship’ (2013), ‘The Psychology of Democracy’ (2016), ‘Questioning Causality: Scientific Explorations of cause and Consequence Across Social Contexts’ (2016, with Rom Harre), and he served as Editor for ‘The Encyclopedia of Political Behavior’ (2017). His next books are ‘Mutual Radicalization’ (APA Press) and ‘The Psychology of Radical Social Change’ (with B. Wagoner and J. Valsiner, Cambridge University Press). More about his research and publications can be found on his website: fathalimoghaddam.com

Affiliation: Georgetown University, Washington D.C., U.S.A


Juan A. Nel

Juan A. Nel

Focus of Lecture: Hate victimisation of the sexually and gender diverse: Understanding the African experience within a global world

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Section for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: Research Professor working from home,
Department of Psychology, College of Human Sciences, University of South Africa
Member of Council: Psychological Society of SA (PsySSA)


William Parham

William Parham

Focus of Lecture: A Way Forward: Mapping a Path on Which Sport Psychology Can Travel in the 21st Century

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Sport & Exercise Psychology Section

Abstract: The discipline of sport psychology has enjoyed important growth and maturation during the last several decades. Related, the progress across many domains has been welcomed and heralded. For example, since its inception in the United States, sport psychology has promoted advances in theoretical and conceptual underpinnings, research designs and scholarly rigor, applications across sport performance domains, suggested implications for domestic as well as international sport psychology professional audiences, and stabilizing disciplinary identities which serve as a hallmark foundation on which to build an even more promising future.

The introduction of cultural sport psychology in the late 1980’s through the 1990’s represented an important shift in sport psychology. The drive to form and solidify their professional identity fueled the early and formative years of the discipline. Cultural sport psychology, with its emphasis on acknowledging the complexities of larger environmental contexts (e.g., social, political, economic) and the impact said contexts have on how athletes think, feel and behave fueled an important developmental transition within sport psychology from infancy and childhood into adolescence. Expanding theory, research and practice of sport psychology, from this point forward, through lenses of cultural sport psychology will continue to be important. In addition, offered for consideration is the belief that implicit bias, stereotype threat, a broader critical pedagogy, and a focus on the millennial generation positions the already healthy juvenescence of sport psychology to emerge into the fuller maturity of adulthood ready to inherit the abundant promises and opportunities that come with this new stage of development.

The proposed presentation advances a position that the aforementioned areas represent critical catalytic stimuli that are needed for continued healthy disciplinary growth and maturation. Further, discovering a deepening consciousness and sensitivity about how socially constructed and systemically-supported political, economic and other environments inextricably influence the ways in which people, across cultures, ethnicities, identities and faiths navigate the inequities (e.g., economic, educational, occupational, etc.) to which they respond on a daily basis all but ensures long-term and sustaining healthy disciplinary growth and maturation.

In short, this presentation serves as an invitation for sport psychology professionals (e.g., psychologists, counselors, researchers and consultants) to enact two practices. First, to embrace self-reflection as a critically necessary component of their life-long development. Second, to develop and appreciate in concrete and measurable ways approaches to research, counseling practice and consultation that feel more inclusive and that more accurately captures the lived experiences and multi-dimensional identities (e.g., culture, race, ethnicity, gender, faith-based, sexual identity, etc.) of athletes they purport to serve.

Bio: WILLIAM D. PARHAM, PH.D., ABPP is a Professor in the Counseling Program in the School of Education, Chair of the Department of Educational Support Services and President of the LMU Faculty Senate. He has devoted his professional career to teaching, training, clinical, administrative, and organizational consultation venues. The interplay between sport psychology, multiculturalism/diversity and health psychology represents the three areas of professional emphases with which he has been most associated. He is a licensed psychologist, Board Certified in Counseling Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) and Past-President of the Society of Counseling Psychology of the American Psychological Association where he also is recognized as a Fellow in Divisions 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology), 45 (Society for the Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race) and 47 (Exercise and Sport Psychology).

In addition to his administrative duties Dr. Parham teaches five courses including: Trauma Counseling: Theories and Interventions; Multicultural Counseling; Foundations of Counseling; Lifespan Development and Social, Emotional and Behavioral Functioning and serves on department, School of Education and university committees.

For most of his professional career, Dr. Parham has focused on working with athletes across organizations (e.g., National Basketball Association; National Football League; Major League Baseball; United States Olympic Committee; United States Tennis Association; Major League Soccer, UCLA, UC Irvine) across levels (e.g., professional, elite, amateur, collegiate and youth) and across sports (e.g., basketball, football, gymnastics, softball, baseball, track and field, tennis, golf, swimming, volleyball, figure skating). He also has worked with performance artists in drama, theatre and music.

Dr. Parham’s emphasis on personal empowerment, discovering and cultivating innate talents and looking for hidden opportunities in every situation are trademark foci. The articles and book chapters he has authored during the course of his career and his participation on local, state and national boards, committees, task forces, and positions of governance adds to the visible ways in which he has tried to make a difference.

Affiliation: Chair | Department of Educational Support Services
Professor | Counseling Program
President | LMU Faculty Senate
School of Education | University Hall, Suite 1500
Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, California


Reinhard Pekrun

Reinhard Pekrun

Focus of Lecture: Achievement Emotions: Functions, Origins, and Implications for Practice

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: Emotions are ubiquitous in achievement settings. Various emotions are experienced in these settings, such as enjoyment, hope, pride, anger, anxiety, shame, or boredom. Despite the relevance of these emotions for learning, performance, and well-being, they have not received much attention by researchers; test anxiety studies and attributional research are notable exceptions. During the past fifteen years, however, there has been growing recognition that achievement emotions are central to individual and collective productivity. In this presentation, I will use Pekrun’s (2006) control-value theory of achievement emotions as a conceptual framework to address the following issues. (1) Which emotions are experienced in achievement settings and how can they be measured? (2) Are achievement emotions functionally important for learning and performance? Test anxiety research has shown that anxiety can exert profound effects on cognitive performance; is this true for other achievement emotions as well? (3) How can we explain the development of these emotions; what are their individual and social origins? To provide answers, the emotional implications of cognitive appraisals, achievement goals, and social environments will be discussed. (4) Are achievement emotions and their functions universal, or do they differ between task domains, genders, and socio-cultural contexts? (5) How can achievement emotions be regulated and treated, and what are the implications for psychological and educational practice? In closing, open research problems will be addressed, including the prospects of neuroscientific research, strategies to integrate idiographic and nomothetic methodologies, and the need for intervention studies targeting achievement emotions.

Bio: Reinhard Pekrun holds the Chair for Personality and Educational Psychology at the University of Munich and is Professorial Fellow at the Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University, Sydney. His research areas include achievement emotion and motivation, personality development, and educational assessment. He pioneered research on emotions in education and originated the Control-Value Theory of Achievement Emotions. Pekrun is a highly cited researcher (see Web of Science, Essential Science Indicators) who has authored 24 books and more than 250 articles and chapters, including numerous publications in leading journals such as Psychological Science, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Educational Psychology, Child Development, Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, and Emotion. Pekrun is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, of the American Educational Research Association, and of the International Academy of Education. He is a member of the editorial boards of top journals such as Educational Psychologist and Journal of Educational Psychology. He also served as President of the Stress and Anxiety Research Society, Dean of the Faculty for Psychology and Education at the University of Regensburg, and Vice-President for Research at the University of Munich. In an advisory capacity, Pekrun is active in policy development and implementation in education. In 2015, he received the John G. Diefenbaker Award from the Canada Council for the Arts, which acknowledges outstanding research accomplishments across fields in the humanities and social sciences. He is also the recipient of the Sylvia Scribner Award 2017 (American Educational Research Association) and the EARLI Oeuvre Award 2017 (European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction).

Affiliation: Ludwig Maximilians Universitat Munchen
Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany
Professorial Fellow, Institute for Positive Psychology and Education Australian Catholic University Strathfield, NSW 2135, Australia


Henry L. Roediger III

Henry L. Roediger III

Focus of Lecture: Making It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Brain and Cognitive Science

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: Washington University in St. Louis


Jérôme Rossier

Jérôme Rossier

Focus of Lecture: Using contextual and personal resources to manager our environmental constraints and design our lives

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Counselling

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: University of Lausanne


Urte Scholz

Urte Scholz

Focus of Lecture: With a Little Help (and Control) From My Social Network: The Role of Social Exchange Processes for Health-Related Outcomes

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: Health-related behaviors usually happen in a social context. Most of the standard theories of health-behavior change, however, strongly focus on individual self-regulation and neglect the social regulation of behavior. Together with findings from research on social integration and better survival, and recent theories highlighting the importance to go beyond the individual and instead focus on dyadic / social co-regulation of behavior, this talk will emphasize the need for theories and research of health behavior’s social side. Social co-regulation of health behaviours needs to be studied within the social context where it occurs with the focus on different means of how people interact to regulate each other’s health behaviour, and by taking multiple outcomes, the health-related behaviour and related proximal health-outcomes, into account.

Potential mechanisms of social co-regulation of health behavior that will be highlighted in this talk are social support, social control, and companionship. These social exchange processes seem to play a relevant role for health-behavior change and other health-related outcomes. This talk will present research from randomized controlled trials, and intensive-longitudinal studies in different contexts on the role of social support, social control, companionship for health-behaviour change, affect, and other relationship- and behavioural outcomes. With this, I will highlight the benefits, but also the challenges and the complexity of social co-regulation of health-behavior change.

Bio: Urte Scholz is professor of applied social and health psychology at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. In her research she investigates the role of self-regulation and social exchange processes (e.g., social support, social control) for health behavior change in ecological momentary assessment or -intervention studies and randomized controlled trials while using objective behavioral measures and drawing on new technologies for data assessment. Urte received her PhD in 2005 at the Freie Universität Berlin, and held positions at the University of Zurich, the University of Berne, and the University of Konstanz. She was Associate Editor of Anxiety, Stress, & Coping and of British Journal of Health Psychology, and is member of several editorial boards of leading journals of Health Psychology. She is the current president of the Division of Health Psychology of IAAP and president-elect of the Swiss Society of Health Psychology. Urte's research is funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. In 2005 she was awarded the early career award of the Stress and Anxiety Research Society, and in 2017 she was granted the honorary fellowhip of the European Health Psychology Society.

Affiliation: University of Zurich


Ralf Schwarzer

Ralf Schwarzer

Focus of Lecture: Health behaviour change: Constructs, mechanisms, interventions

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: Health-compromising behaviors such as physical inactivity and poor dietary habits are difficult to change. Most social-cognitive theories assume that an individual’s intention to change is the best direct predictor of actual change. But people often do not behave in accordance with their intentions. This discrepancy between intention and behavior is due to several reasons. For example, unforeseen barriers could emerge, or people might give in to temptations. Therefore, intention needs to be supplemented by other, more proximal factors that might compromise or facilitate the translation of intentions into action. Some of these postintentional factors have been identified, such as perceived self-efficacy, action control, and strategic planning. They help to bridge the intention-behavior gap. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) suggests a distinction between (a) preintentional motivation processes that lead to a behavioral intention, and (b) postintentional volition processes that lead to the actual health behavior. In this presentation, the theory is explained, and a few example studies are reported that examine the role of volitional mediators in the initiation and adherence to health behaviors. Findings from intervention studies on dental hygiene, physical activity, dietary habits, sunscreen use, vaccination, dust mask wearing, and hand hygiene are presented. Studies were conducted in Iran, Germany, Thailand, Costa Rica, Poland, China, and India. The focus is on constructs and mechanisms of change such as sequential mediation and moderated mediation. Moreover, psychological issues in the context of digital interventions are addressed. The general aim is to examine the theoretical backdrop of health behavior change. More details about theory and projects http://my.psyc.de.

Bio: Ralf Schwarzer is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the Freie University of Berlin, Germany, and Professor of Psychology at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Wroclaw, Poland.He has received his Ph.D. in 1973 (Kiel), and was appointed Professor of Education in 1974, and Professor of Psychology in 1982 (FU Berlin). After sabbatical leaves at the University of California, Berkeley (1985), and Los Angeles (1990-1991), he was Visiting Professor at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (1994-1995), and at York University, Canada (1998) where he served as Adjunct Professor. He has published more than 500 papers, and has co-founded three journals: (a) Anxiety, Stress, and Coping: An International Journal, (b) Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie, and (c) Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being (currently Editor-in-Chief). He is Past-President of the Stress and Anxiety Research Society (STAR), Past-President of the European Health Psychology Society (EHPS), and Past-President of the Health Psychology Division of the International Association for Applied Psychology (IAAP). His research focus lies on health behaviours, stress, coping, social support, self-efficacy, psychological assessment, and digital interventions. In 2007, he received the German Psychology Award. He was one of the organizers of the International Congress of Psychology (ICP) in Berlin 2008. In 2010, he received the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP).
Website: http://my.psyc.de

Affiliation: Freie Universität Berlin, Germany


Stephen Sireci

Stephen Sireci

Focus of Lecture: Do Educational Tests Do More Good Than Harm? Criticisms, Benefits, and Evidence

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: Educational tests are often lauded by policy makers and are valued for providing objective information. Purported benefits of testing include improving instruction; improving educational systems; providing important feedback to teachers, parents, and students; improving decisions regarding admissions and course placement, and protecting the public (e.g., licensure testing). However, there are well-known criticisms of educational tests that refute these claims and argue that educational tests may cause more harm than good. In this presentation, I will discuss the purported benefits and criticisms of educational tests, and discuss how we can evaluate the validity of these claims. I will also summarize evidence for and against the utility of educational tests. Conclusions will be drawn from this evidence, and suggestions for future research and practice in educational assessment will be provided.

Bio: Stephen G. Sireci, Ph.D. is Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Educational Assessment in the College of Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He earned his Ph.D. in psychometrics from Fordham University and his master and bachelor degrees in psychology from Loyola College in Maryland. Before UMASS, he was Senior Psychometrician at the GED Testing Service, Psychometrician for the Uniform CPA Exam and Research Supervisor of Testing for the Newark NJ Board of Education. He is known for his research in evaluating test fairness, particularly issues related to content validity, test bias, cross-lingual assessment, standard setting, and computerized-adaptive testing. He is the author of over 130 publications and conference papers, and is the co-architect of the Massachusetts Adult Proficiency Tests. He is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association and a Fellow of Division 5 of the American Psychological Association. Formerly, he was President of the Northeastern Educational Research Association (NERA), Co-Editor of the International Journal of Testing, a Senior Scientist for the Gallup Organization and a member of the Board of Directors for the National Council on Measurement in Education. He has received several awards from UMass including the College of Education’s Outstanding Teacher Award, the Chancellor’s Medal, the Conti Faculty Fellowship, and a Public Engagement Fellowship. He also received the Thomas Donlon Award for Distinguished Mentoring and the Leo Doherty Award for Outstanding Service from NERA, and the Samuel J. Messick Memorial Lecture Award from Educational Testing Service and the International Language Testing Association in 2017. Professor Sireci reviews articles for over a dozen professional journals and he is on the editorial boards of Applied Measurement in Education, Educational Assessment, Educational and Psychological Measurement, and Psicothema.

Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst


Kazuhisa Takemura

Kazuhisa Takemura

Focus of Lecture: Avoiding Bad Decisions: From the Perspective of Behavioral Economics

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 9: Economic Psychology

Abstract: Decision-making is often broadly defined as the conscious function of making a decision, but can also refer to the technical act of selecting an alternative from a group of alternatives, i.e., the action of choosing. Choosing a partner, deciding which social policy to adopt, and the consumer behavior of selecting a brand are all examples of decision-making. Bad decisions are defined as those that are not substantially better (i.e., that are not Pareto dominated) than the worst decision (selection of the worst option in all aspects). Bad decisions are made even in serious situations such as selecting a personal career or selecting an important policy in management and politics. In this talk, I will first introduce the conceptual and mathematical framework for multi-attribute decision-making and explain from a theoretical point of view why it is almost impossible to make the best decision. I will then give some examples of bad decisions that were determined as such by experimental studies in both individual and group settings. In experimental studies, people tended to make bad decisions even in fatal situations if they focused on the trivial aspects of a problem. Interestingly, bad decisions were not very related to educational background. In addition to providing a psychological model of bad decisions in multi-attribute situations, I offer some suggestions based on empirical research and computer simulation studies on how to avoid making bad decisions.

Bio: Kazuhisa Takemura is Professor of Social and Economic Psychology, and Director of the Institute for Decision Research, at Waseda University. He received a Ph.D. in System Science from the Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1994, and a Ph.D. in Medical Science from Kitasato University in 2013. He has been affiliated with Waseda University since 2002. He has extensive experience working abroad as a visiting researcher (James Cook University, La Trobe University, Australian National University, Tinbergen Institute, Gothenburg University, and Stockholm University). He was also a Fulbright Senior Researcher at the Department of Social and Decision Science, Carnegie Mellon University, from 1999 to 2000, and a Visiting Professor at the Department of Psychology, St. Petersburg State University in 2008 and Venice International University in 2015. His main research interest is human judgment and decision-making, in particular, mathematical modeling of preferential judgment and choice. He has authored and edited 13 books including Behavioral Decision Theory: Psychological and Mathematical Descriptions of Human Choice Behavior (Springer, 2014). He has also authored over 200 journal articles and book chapters. He received the Hayashi Award (Distinguished Scholar) from The Behaviormetric Society in 2002, the Excellent Paper Award from The Japan Society of Kansei Engineering in 2003, and Book Awards from The Japanese Society of Social Psychology in 2010 and from The Behaviormetric Society in 2016. He currently serves as a Board Member of the Association of Behavioral Economics and Finance, and

Affiliation: Professor of Psychology, Waseda University,
Director, Institute of Decision Research, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan


Robert J. Vallerand

Robert J. Vallerand

Focus of Lecture: The role of passion in people's life

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: Université du Quebec at Montreal


Fanny Verkampt

Fanny Verkampt

Focus of Lecture: Child-victims' Rights at the sharp end: Taking up the challenges raised by Human Trafficking investigations.

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 10: Psychology and Law

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: Université Toulouse - Jean Jaurès


Robert Wood

Robert Wood

Focus of Lecture: Stable, Dynamic and Situational Units of Personality: an Integrated Perspective

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 1: Work and Organizational Psychology

Abstract: In this talk, I will explore the meaning of structure and process in the study of behavior, emotions and cognitions and the implications for the study of personality. The accepted view of personality in organizational and other applied areas of psychology is that of traits, where structure means invariance in individual responses across situations and time. An alternative view is that of orderliness in the processes that underpin behavior, emotions and cognitions. Until recently, this view has been adopted in clinical case studies of individuals. More recently, quantitative approaches have been used to study the patterns of orderliness in individual variations in behavior, emotions and cognitions by linking them to the properties of situations. This new approach, which is being integrated with studies of between person differences, such as traits, raises some interesting questions, which will be addressed in this talk, Including: What do we mean by situations? How do we best model or represent the relationships between situations and responses? What value does this new approach add to the accepted view of personality? Can the new quantitative approaches be used in,clinical and historical studies?

Bio: Robert Wood is a research Professor in the Australian Graduate School of Management at UNSW. He studied at WAIT, University of Washington and Stanford. Bob has founded and been Director of the Centre for Ethical Leadership, the Accelerated Learning Laboratories, and the private company Cognicity, Bob conducts research into the dynamics of human adaptivity in leadership, ethics, diversity and inclusion. His research has won several awards including, most recently, the 2016 Jay Forester Award (with Shayne Gary) and the 2016 Georgia Babladelis Award (with Victor Sojo and Anna Genat). He is currently Research Director for the Recruit Smarter project of the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet and is a Fellow of APA, IAAP, ASSA and ANZAM.

Affiliation: University of Melbourne, Australia