Invited Congress Speakers

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES


Dolores Albarracin

Dolores Albarracin

Focus of Lecture: Designing Actionable Interventions to Change Behavior

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Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Alfred Allan

Alfred Allan

Focus of Lecture: The ethical responsibilities of researchers, reviewers and editors working in the psychology and law field

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Jocelyn J. Bélanger

Jocelyn J. Bélanger

Focus of Lecture: The Psychology of Self-Sacrifice

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Extremism & Terrorism; Sport & Exercise

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Affiliation: New York University, Abu Dhabi


James Bray

James Bray

Focus of Lecture: International Perspectives on Integrated Health Care

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Professional Psychology

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Bio: James H. Bray, PhD is Professor and Chair of Psychology at the University of Texas San Antonio. He was previously an Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine and Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He was the 2009 President of the American Psychological Association. His presidential themes were the Future of Psychology Practice and Science and Psychology’s Contribution to Ending Homelessness. He is also president of the Division of Professional Practice of the International Association of Applied Psychology. Dr. Bray’s NIH funded research focuses on adolescent substance use, divorce, remarriage and stepfamilies. He has published over 200 articles in major journal and books. He was the director of a federal HRSA faculty development program for physicians and was the director of the SAMSHA funded project on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) project. He is a pioneer in collaborative healthcare and primary care psychology. He has presented his work in 20 countries.

Affiliation: Professor and Chair of Psychology at the University of Texas San Antonio.


Charles P. Chen

Charles P. Chen

Focus of Lecture: Enriching Career Psychology with Positive Compromise

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Counselling

Abstract: Vocational wellness comprises an integral and critical part of the total wellbeing and mental health of human beings, given the fact that issues of worklife and other aspects of personal and social life experiences are intertwined. With a central focus on enhancing individuals’ vocational wellbeing, the essential role and function of career psychology aim to help people generate insights and find more effective ways to take control of their career destination, managing and improving their quality of life in a highly competitive and uncertain world of work. To this end, this keynote address introduces the emerging model of Positive Compromise (PC) in career psychology. The PC model provides both a theoretical framework and a practical guide for scholars, researchers, and practitioners in the realm of vocational and career psychology broadly defined, helping people to be creative and proactive in career management. The central premise is that in light of uncertainty a person often has to give up something less feasible and achievable in order to accomplish career goals and projects that are more practical and obtainable. As a result, compromise becomes an inevitable vital construct in achieving a healthier and more constructive state of vocational being. To expand on the theoretical notion of compromise in the career literature, this address elaborates on the rationale and key tenets of the positive compromise framework, leading to reconceptualizing the meaning of compromise in vocational and career psychology. Alongside evidence from empirical research, the positive compromise framework provides an optimal alternative for career management and construction. Implications for career counselling interventions are illustrated.

In doing so, this address attempts to achieve three learning objectives. First, understand the value of existing theories. Second, see the great potential and meaningfulness of theoretical development in the field. Third, build a pivotal link between theory, research, and practice.

Bio: Charles P. Chen, PhD, is Professor of Counselling Psychology and a Canada Research Chair at the University of Toronto (UofT). He is a Distinguished Honorary Professor and Guest Chair Professor at more than 10 major universities around the world. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, a noted social scientist in Canadian Who’s Who and Who’s Who in the World, and an award-winning professor for Excellence in Graduate Teaching at UofT.

Charles is a keynote/plenary speaker and regular presenter at conferences, and a distinguished guest speaker in various academic and professional contexts around the world for more than 170 times/sessions. He is also a featured expert in news media. His works include 6 scholarly/research books, 10 book chapters, and over 50 refereed journal articles. His book “Career Endeavour (Ashgate, 2006)” received the best counselling book award in Canada. According to Google Scholar, Charles is one of the Top 9 most cited authors in literature regarding postmodern constructivist and constructionist studies within the realm of vocational and career psychology.

Affiliation:Professor
Canada Research Chair
Counselling and Clinical Psychology Program
Department of Applied Psychology & Human Development
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
University of Toronto


Fanny M Cheung

Fanny M. Cheung

Focus of Lecture: Cultural perspectives in personality assessment

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

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Affiliation: The Chinese University of Hong Kong


German Antonio Gutierrez Dominguez

German Antonio Gutierrez Dominguez

Focus of Lecture: Comparative psychology of sexual behavior: From basic processes to applied settings

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical; Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

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Affiliation: National University of Colombia


Maria Eduarda Duarte

Maria Eduarda Duarte

Focus of Lecture: “Work and days”: the freedoms and the restraints to promote a decent life

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical; Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

Abstract: The nature of work nowadays presents a wealth of challenges for career counseling, including for this exercise the recognition of the plurality of knowledge-based cultures and contexts. The opening section is centered on the idea that cultural or contextual issues represent pieces which are integral to the puzzle of career counseling, rather than being something that can be isolated. Through this perspective, career counseling processes are understood as being dependent on specific cultural and contextual aspects that must be taken into consideration throughout the entire counseling process. A second purpose is to evaluate the gaps found between theory and practice effectiveness. To close these gaps, i.e., connecting science to solutions, a more determined approach to the strategic impact of counseling must be taken, expanding focus out from individual research into a broader base, therein incorporating solutions that highlight indigenous perspectives conceptualized reflexively and dialogically.

Bio: M. Eduarda Duarte is Full Professor at the University of Lisbon, Faculty of Psychology, where she directs the Master Course in Psychology of Human Resources, Work, and Organizations. Her professional interests include career psychology theory and research, with special emphasis on issues relevant to adults and the world of work. She is research director of Career Guidance and Development of Human Resources Services. Her publications and presentations have encompassed topics on adult’s career problems, testing and assessment, and counselling process. She is since 2005 Chair of the Portuguese Psychological Society; she also served on editorial boards for some Portuguese, European, and Iberia-American journals. She was the Director of the National Institute of Guidance (2009-2014). She is President of Counselling Division, IAAP. She is Fellow Award – IAAP (2014), and ESVDC award 2015. She is also National Defence Adviser, since 2006.

Affiliation: University of Lisbon, Portugal


Andrew Elliot

Andrew Elliot

Focus of Lecture: Competition and achievement outcomes: A hierarchical motivational analysis

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: In my talk, I will provide a conceptual overview of the hierarchical model of achievement motivation, and I will apply this model to competitive striving. The hierarchical model distinguishes between two aspects of motivation – energization (general competitive desire) and direction (pursuit of specific performance-based goals) – and integrates them together into an overarching model of competition. I will present a series of studies showing that competitive desires lead to both performance-approach and performance-avoidance goal pursuit, and that these two goals have an opposite impact on achievement-relevant outcomes. I will end my talk by discussing implications for real-world achievement contexts.

Bio: Andrew J. Elliot is Professor of Psychology at the University of Rochester. He has held Visiting Professor positions at Cambridge University, King Abdulaziz University, Oxford University, and the University of Munich, and has been a Visiting Fellow at Churchill College (Cambridge) and Jesus College (Oxford). He received his Ph. D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1994. His research focuses on achievement motivation and approach-avoidance motivation. He is currently editor of Advances in Motivation Science, and has over 200 scholarly publications. He has received multiple awards for his teaching and research contributions to both educational and social-personality psychology. He has given keynote or university addresses in more than 20 different countries, and his lab regularly hosts professors, post-docs, and graduate students from around the globe.

Affiliation: University of Rochester


Martin Euwema

Martin Euwema

Focus of Lecture: TBC

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Affiliation: KU Leuven, Belgian


Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros

Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros

Focus of Lecture: Longevity and behavior

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Affiliation: Autonoma University of Madrid


Tommy Garling

Tommy Gärling

Focus of Lecture: Urban Travel: Interfaces with Psychology

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Abstract: Why do people travel? How do people travel? How are people influenced by travel? After briefly addressing the first two questions, I present research investigating how psychological well-being is influenced by daily travel in urban areas. An overview is first given of different conceptualizations of psychological well-being as cognitive judgements of satisfaction and experienced emotions, and their possible relation to travel. This is followed by a presentation of the methods that have been developed to measure travel-related well-being including self-report measures of attitude towards travel obtained before travel, measures of mood and emotions obtained during travel, and measures of mood and satisfaction obtained after travel. Urban travel is a frequent activity taking up much of the time of the daily lives of many people, in particular those in the work force and students commuting to their work places. It may therefore be appropriate to consider satisfaction with travel as a domain satisfaction that to some degree like other domain satisfactions influences overall life satisfaction. The results are presented of several surveys using different methods to show how satisfaction with travel and indirectly overall life satisfaction are influenced in different segments of the population by travel time, travel mode, in-vehicle activities, and interruptions. Different interpretations of these findings are discussed to give a coherent picture of the role of psychological factors in urban travel.

Bio: Research Council of Humanities and Social Sciences and Director of the Transportation Research Unit at Umeå University, he was in 1992 appointed as Professor of Psychology at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg. He held this position until 2008 when he became Emeritus Professor.

Tommy Gärling has conducted research in five main areas, judgment and decision making (basic research on different topics related to evaluations and emotions), environmental psychology (spatial cognition; childhood accidents; residential choice; restorative effects of natural environments; pro-environmental values, attitudes and behavior), econonomic psychology and behavioral economics/finance (money perception and perceived inflation; sustainable investments and values; herding in stock markets; effects of bonus systems on investors´ short-sightedness; consumers’ trust in and satisfaction with financial institutions), travel behavior (computational process models of interrelated activity/travel choice; evaluation of transport policies to reduce car use; attractiveness of public transport; how travel influences satisfaction and emotions ), and consumer behavior, marketing and retailing (replacement purchases of cars; attractiveness and accessibility of stores for grocery shopping).

Tommy Gärling is the editor or co-editor of 11 books and has authored and co-authored more than 250 papers published in peer-reviewed international journals in psychology, applied psychology (environmental and economic psychology), transportation, geography and planning, economics, and consumer behavior, close to 100 book chapters including five invited chapters for handbooks of environmental psychology, economic psychology, consumer behavior, and transportation, and a large number of other publications in both English and Swedish.

Tommy Gärling was member of the scientific committee of the international congress of psychology in Stockholm 2000 being responsible for The Dag Hammarskjöld memorial symposia on diplomacy and psychology with participation of UN deputy director Jan Eliasson and a large number of top-level psychology researchers. In 2002 he co-organized one of the biannual conferences of the European Association of Decision Making. He has also co-organized another five international conferences on various topics and has convened more than 10 invited symposia. He has been invited keynote speaker at seven international conferences and presented his research more than 300 times at international conferences.

From 1998 to 2002 Tommy Gärling was president of the environmental psychology division of the International Association of Applied Psychology and in 2014 he became fellow of the association. He is a former member of the board of the International Association of Travel Behavior Research. He has been an associate editor of Journal of Economic Psychology and member of the editorial boards of Journal of Environmental Psychology, Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly Journal of Socio-Economics), Spatial Cognition & Computation, and Transportation.

Affiliation: Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden


Stevan E. Hobfoll

Stevan E. Hobfoll

Focus of Lecture: Terrorism Threat: Trauma, Resilience and Political Decay

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical, Community

Abstract: In the face of terrorism, rocket attacks and war, people react with a range of emotions from deeply experienced distress to an amazing level of resilience. At the same time, the politics of fear can be seen as producing a shift to a more right wing, militant stance, especially in those who begin with a more right wing approach to politics. The study of stress and trauma has focused on pathological responses, and seldom examined either resilience or political reactivity, despite politics being one way we cope with threat. We examine terrorist attacks and other mass casualty circumstances around the world in light of how to better define resilience, resistance, and recovery, as well as how threat and loss is impacting our political selves. In so doing the epidemiology of resilience, how it might be defined, and how it should be explored in future research is explored. This work is critical for broadening our theoretical understanding of people’s responding to trauma, key to public health intervention, and carries enormous potential for building a Psychology of Human Strength in the face of adversity that has been absent in trauma studies. Our work on the consequences of terrorism, mass conflict and war from the World Trade Center attacks, Israel and Palestine will be presented. This more complex understanding of impact, resilience, and resistance suggests important roles for individual differences in vulnerability and resiliency-related characteristics, as well as the influence of key situational differences in levels of exposure, the chronicity of exposure, and environmental contingencies.

Bio: Dr. Stevan Hobfoll has authored and edited 12 books, including TRAUMATIC STRESS, THE ECOLOGY OF STRESS, STRESS CULTURE AND COMMUNITY, and THE IMPERFECT GUARDIAN (an historical novel set in Eastern Europe at the time of WWI). In addition, he has authored over 250 journal articles, book chapters, and technical reports. He has been a frequent workshop leader on stress, war, and terrorism, stress and health, and organizational stress. He has received over $18 million in research grants on stress. Dr. Hobfoll is currently the Judd and Marjorie Weinberg Presidential Professor and Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences at Rush Medical College in Chicago, joining Rush in 2008. His current research focuses on trauma in zones of conflict and on the connection between stress and biological-health outcomes in women’s lives.

Dr. Hobfoll was a Senior Fellow of the Center for National Security Studies at the University of Haifa, Israel. Formerly at Tel Aviv and Ben Gurion Universities, and an officer in the Israeli Defense Forces, he remains involved with the problem of stress in Israel. Dr. Hobfoll was cited by the Encyclopædia Britannica for his contribution to knowledge and understanding for his Ecology of Stress. He was co-chair of the American Psychological Association Commission on Stress and War during Operation Desert Storm, helping plan for the prevention of prolonged distress among military personnel and their families, a member of the U.S. Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee of the National Biodefense Science Board (NBSB), and a member of APA’s Task Force on Resilience in Response to Terrorism. Dr. Hobfoll published the first randomized clinical trial on the prevention of HIV/AIDS in women. He has been a consultant to several nations, military organizations, and major corporations on problems of stress and health.

Professor Hobfoll has been honored with multiple lifetime achievement awards for work on traumatic stress, and work on stress and health. His work has made a difference in millions of people’s lives around the world, believing that academia must be a beacon of light for the world, not an ivory tower. He was honored by the State of Ohio for implementation of efforts to protect poor women of color from violence and disease in Ohio. His work was selected as a model program by both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control for translation of research to effective intervention in inner-city women’s lives, especially addressing violence and physical health. His work on mass casualty intervention was designated as one of the most influential recent contributions to psychiatry. His 5 principles of mass casualty intervention paper (Hobfoll, Watson, et al., 2007) was selected by the Psychiatry Journal Focus as one of the most influential recent papers in psychiatry. Indeed, this blueprint is the world standard for mass casualty intervention and treatment of refugees throughout the world, adopted by dozens of countries, the World Health Organization and hundreds of NGOs (h-index 74; 35000 citations, 10/17).

Affiliation: The Judd and Marjorie Weinberg Presidential Professor and Chair
Professor of Behavioral Sciences, Medicine, Preventive Medicine & Nursing Science
Department of Behavioral Sciences
Rush University Medical Center


Anita Hubley

Anita Hubley

Focus of Lecture: Missed opportunities in testing and assessment: Consequences, side effects, and response processes

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

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Affiliation: University of British Columbia


Dragos Iliescu

Dragos Iliescu

Focus of Lecture: On the Equivalence of Measurement Instruments across Languages and Cultures: Between Ignorance and Half-Hearted Acceptance

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: The presentation delves into the realm of test adaptation (or test localization, test indigenization), a scientific and professional activity which now spans the whole realm of the social and behavioural sciences. Adapting tests to various linguistic and cultural contexts is a critical process in today's globalized world and combines knowledge and skills from such domains as psychometrics, cross-cultural psychology and others. Cross-cultural equivalence (invariance) of the adapted form with the original form is the indicator of a valid test adaptation. Such evidence should be provided by any scientific work based on, or including adapted measures. This requirement is however largely ignored in publications, and in many cases is only half-heartedly and incompletely followed. The presentation will discuss various sub-optimal practices and biases resulted from the these practices, as well as recommendations for good practice in this important domain.

Bio: Dragos Iliescu is a Professor of Psychology with the University of Bucharest in Romania. His research interests group around two domains: psychological and educational assessment, tests and testing (with an important cross-cultural component), and applied (I/O) psychology. He has consulted on various international projects related to test adaptation and assessment on all the 5 continents. He is the current President (2016-2018) of the International Test Commission (ITC). Two of his latest publications are The ITC International Handbook of Testing and Assessment (2016, Oxford University Press, co-editor with Frederick Leong, Dave Bartram, Fanny Cheung, Kurt Geisinger) and Adapting Tests in Linguistic and Cultural Situations (2017, Cambridge University Press).

Affiliation: University of Bucharest


Sonia Lippke

Sonia Lippke

Focus of Lecture: Health psychology in times of globalization and migration: state of the science and future directions

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

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Bio:

Affiliation: Professor of Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine;
Department of Psychology & Methods/ Focus Area Diversity;
Jacobs Center on Lifelong Learning and Institutional Development (JCLL) & Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS);
Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany


Kobus Maree

Kobus Maree

Focus of Lecture: Contextualizing and Decontextualizing Different Approaches to Career Counselling for Use in Diverse Social Contexts: Some Research Findings

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Div 16: Counselling

Abstract: Much has been written about the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on theory and practice developed in Europe and North America in particular to guide developing country theorists’, researchers’, and practitioners’ individual and collective responses to fundamental changes in the occupational world (driven by what has become known as Work 4.0 or Industry 4.0 (the 4th Industrial Revolution). While some argue in favour of such “importation” of theory and practice, others stress the need to research, promote, develop, and implement indigenous theory and practice in local contexts. Increasing calls to “decolonize” education and psychology in Africa have lent support to this view. Constructivist approaches, especially, have lately come under fire for allegedly being out of step with collectivist mindsets and contexts. Most researchers, theorists, and practitioners, however, appear to support a “middle of the road” approach, that is, using what is available while simultaneously developing indigenous theory and practice.
In this paper, I advocate use of the constructivist notions of constructing, deconstructing, reconstructing, and co-constructing to guide career counsellors’ individual and collective global responses to changes in the occupational world. More particularly, I make a case for contextualizing, decontextualizing, recontextualizng, and co-contextualizing career counselling theory and practice to accommodate different cultures and social contexts in an attempt to devise career counselling theory and interventions that can help alleviate poverty and promote sustainable decent work in resource-scarce contexts in particular.
In the second part of the presentation, I report on the findings of a number of recent research projects conducted in a severely disadvantaged (third world) area of South Africa, a country comprising developed and underdeveloped, first world and third world contexts adjacent to each other and intricately interwoven, yet vastly different in terms of available resources. Interesting results were obtained using an integrated, qualitative+quantitative approach (contextualized and decontextualized to heighten its value in the first world and third world contexts referred to above) to collect the personal data. The results showed that people’s often desperate poverty should not be considered the sole or “major” problem. Of grave concern also is that they do not have the opportunity to find meaning and purpose in their work-lives.

Bio: Prof. Kobus Maree (DEd (Career Counselling); PhD (Learning Facilitation in Mathematics); DPhil (Psychology)) is a full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Pretoria. His main research interests are career construction (counselling), life design (counselling), emotional-social intelligence and social responsibility, and learning facilitation in mathematics. He links research results to appropriate career choices and to life designing.
Past editor of a number of scholarly journals, for instance, the South African Journal of Psychology, managing editor of Gifted Education International, regional editor for Southern Africa: Early Child Development and Care, and a member of several national and international bodies, including the Society for Vocational Psychology (SVP) (USA), the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) (USA), the Psychology Association of South Africa (SA), and the Association of Science of South Africa (ASSAf). In 2009, he was awarded the Stals Prize of the South African Academy of Science and Arts for exceptional research and contributions to Psychology. In June 2014, he was awarded the Stals prize for exceptional research and contributions to Education, and he received the Psychological Society of South Africa’s (PsySSA) Award for Excellence in Science during the 20th South African Psychology Congress in September 2014. Prof. Maree was awarded Honorary Membership of the Golden Key International Honour Society for exceptional academic achievements, leadership skills and community involvement in October 2014. He was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal for Teaching and Learning from the University of Pretoria in 2010 and has been nominated successfully as an Exceptional Academic Achiever on four consecutive occasions (2003-2016). He has a B1 rating from the National Research Foundation (the highest rating in the history of the faculty).
Prof. Maree has authored or co­authored 100+ peer­reviewed articles and 55 books/ book chapters on career counselling, research and related topics since 2009. In the same period, he supervised 33 doctoral theses and Master’s dissertations and read keynote papers at 20+ international and at 20+ national conferences. He has also presented numerous invited workshops at conferences across the world on a) integrating qualitative and quantitative approaches in career counselling, and b) the art and science of writing scholarly articles. Over the past seven years, he has spent a lot of time abroad. For instance, he accepted invitations to spend time as a visiting professor at various universities where he presented workshops on e.g. contemporary developments in career counselling, article writing, and research methodology. Prof. Maree was awarded a fellowship of the IAAP at the ICAP Conference in Paris in July, 2014. In September 2017, he was awarded PsySSA’s Fellow Award (Lifetime Award in recognition of a person who has made exceptional contributions to Psychology in her/his life) at the PAPU Congress in Durban, South Africa.

Affiliation: University of Pretoria, South Africa


Herb Marsh

Herb Marsh

Focus of Lecture: Academic Self-concept: Cornerstone of a Revolution in the Positive Educational Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: There is a positive psychology revolution sweeping educational psychology, one that emphasizes how healthy, normal and exceptional students can get the most from education. Positive self-beliefs are at the heart of this revolution. My self-concept research programme represents a substantive-quantitative synergy, applying and developing new quantitative approaches to better address substantive issues with important policy implications. Self-concept is a multidimensional hierarchical construct with highly differentiated components such as academic, social, physical and emotional self-concepts that cannot be understood from a unidimensional approach that considers only self-esteem. Particularly in educational psychology, self-concept enhancement is a major goal. Self-concept is also an important mediating factor that facilitates the attainment of other desirable outcomes. In education, for example, a positive academic self-concept is both a highly desirable goal and a means of facilitating subsequent academic accomplishments. However, the benefits of feeling positively about oneself in relation to choice, planning, persistence and subsequent accomplishments, transcend traditional disciplinary and cultural barriers. Perhaps more than any other areas within educational psychology, there is extensive international cross-cultural tests and support for the generalizability of the major theoretical models in the discipline. My purpose here is to provide an overview of my self-concept research in which I address diverse theoretical and methodological issues with practical implications for research, policy and practice such as:

  • Does a positive self-concept ‘cause’ better school performance or is it the other way around?
  • Why do self-concepts decline for:
    • gifted students who attend selective schools?
    • learning disabled students in regular classrooms?
  • Are multiple dimensions of self-concept more distinct than multiple intelligences?
  • Why do people think of themselves as ‘math’ persons or ‘verbal’ persons?
  • Does a positive physical self-concept lead to health-related physical activity?
  • Do self-concept models hold up cross-nationally and cross-culturally?
  • Positive Effects of Repeating a Year in School on Academic Self-concept and Achievment
  • How does country-average achievement influence academic self-concept
  • .

Bio: Professor Herb Marsh (BA Hons, Indiana Univ; MA, PhD, UCLA; DSc UWestSyd; HonDoc, Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munich) Professor of Psychology,Institute for Positive Psychology and Education at the Australian Catholic University, and Emeritus Professor at Oxford University. He is an “ISI highly cited researcher” (http://isihighlycited.com/) with 700+ publications, 88,000+citations and an H-index = 146 in Google Scholar (Google Citations), co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. European Commission study of citations based on the Google scholar H-Index, across all science, social science and humanity disciplines he was ranked first among all Australian researchers, and 228th in the world (http://www.webometrics.info/en/node/58/). He founded and has served as Director for 20 years of the SELF Research Centre that has 500+ members and satellite centres at leading Universities around the world. He coined the phrase substantive-methodological research synergy which underpins his research efforts. In addition to his methodological focus on structural equation models, factor analysis, and multilevel modelling, his major substantive interests include self-concept and motivational constructs; evaluations of teaching/educational effectiveness; developmental psychology; sports psychology; the peer review process; gender differences; peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Affiliation: Institute For Positive Psychology & Education, Australian Catholic University; University of Oxford


Fathali Moghaddam

Fathali Moghaddam

Focus of Lecture: Understanding and Solving Mutual Radicalization: When Groups and Nations Drive Each Other to Extremes

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical, Community

Abstract: The process of Mutual Radicalization (MR) comes about when the actions of one group triggers more extreme responses in a second group, and this triggers further radicalization in the first group, so the two groups take increasingly extreme positions opposing one another, reacting against real or imagined threats, moving further and further apart. Mutual radicalization eventually leads to pathological hatred, so that ‘your pain, my gain’ becomes the guide for the actions of both groups. Using case-studies of major nations (e.g., the U.S.A and Iran; North and South Korea; China and Japan) and groups (e.g., The National Rifle Association and gun regulation groups; Trump and Sanders; ‘gridlockracy’ on the Hill), I present a dynamic model of mutual radicalization. The three major parts of this model apply to all groups and nations, but the steps within each part do not apply to all cases. In the final section, I provide a number of guidelines for preventing mutual radicalization, as well as resolving mutual radicalization after it has developed and extremism is normative in one or both groups.

Bio: Fathali M. Moghaddam is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science at Georgetown University, Washington D.C., U.S.A. From 2008-2014 he was Director, Conflict Resolution Program, Department of Government, Georgetown University. In 2014 he became Editor-in-Chief, Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology (published by the American Psychological Association). Dr. Moghaddam was born in Iran, educated from an early age in England, and returned to Iran with the revolution in 1979. He was researching and teaching in Iran during the hostage taking crisis and the first three years of the Iran-Iraq War. After work for the United Nations, he researched and taught at McGill University, Canada, from 1984, before moving to Georgetown in 1990. He has conducted experimental and field research in numerous cultural contexts and published extensively on the psychology of conflict, terrorism, democracy, dictatorship, political plasticity, and mutual radicalization. His most recent books are ‘The Psychology of dictatorship’ (2013), ‘The Psychology of Democracy’ (2016), ‘Questioning Causality: Scientific Explorations of cause and Consequence Across Social Contexts’ (2016, with Rom Harre), and he served as Editor for ‘The Encyclopedia of Political Behavior’ (2017). His next books are ‘Mutual Radicalization’ (APA Press) and ‘The Psychology of Radical Social Change’ (with B. Wagoner and J. Valsiner, Cambridge University Press). More about his research and publications can be found on his website: fathalimoghaddam.com

Affiliation: Georgetown University, Washington D.C., U.S.A


Juan A. Nel

Juan A. Nel

Focus of Lecture: Hate victimisation of the sexually and gender diverse: Understanding the African experience within a global world

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Bio:

Affiliation: Research Professor working from home
Department of Psychology
College of Human Sciences
Member of Council: Psychological Society of SA (PsySSA)


Reinhard Pekrun

Reinhard Pekrun

Focus of Lecture: Achievement Emotions: Functions, Origins, and Implications for Practice

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: Emotions are ubiquitous in achievement settings. Various emotions are experienced in these settings, such as enjoyment, hope, pride, anger, anxiety, shame, or boredom. Despite the relevance of these emotions for learning, performance, and well-being, they have not received much attention by researchers; test anxiety studies and attributional research are notable exceptions. During the past fifteen years, however, there has been growing recognition that achievement emotions are central to individual and collective productivity. In this presentation, I will use Pekrun’s (2006) control-value theory of achievement emotions as a conceptual framework to address the following issues. (1) Which emotions are experienced in achievement settings and how can they be measured? (2) Are achievement emotions functionally important for learning and performance? Test anxiety research has shown that anxiety can exert profound effects on cognitive performance; is this true for other achievement emotions as well? (3) How can we explain the development of these emotions; what are their individual and social origins? To provide answers, the emotional implications of cognitive appraisals, achievement goals, and social environments will be discussed. (4) Are achievement emotions and their functions universal, or do they differ between task domains, genders, and socio-cultural contexts? (5) How can achievement emotions be regulated and treated, and what are the implications for psychological and educational practice? In closing, open research problems will be addressed, including the prospects of neuroscientific research, strategies to integrate idiographic and nomothetic methodologies, and the need for intervention studies targeting achievement emotions.

Bio: Reinhard Pekrun holds the Chair for Personality and Educational Psychology at the University of Munich and is Professorial Fellow at the Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University, Sydney. His research areas include achievement emotion and motivation, personality development, and educational assessment. He pioneered research on emotions in education and originated the Control-Value Theory of Achievement Emotions. Pekrun is a highly cited researcher (see Web of Science, Essential Science Indicators) who has authored 24 books and more than 250 articles and chapters, including numerous publications in leading journals such as Psychological Science, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Educational Psychology, Child Development, Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, and Emotion. Pekrun is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, of the American Educational Research Association, and of the International Academy of Education. He is a member of the editorial boards of top journals such as Educational Psychologist and Journal of Educational Psychology. He also served as President of the Stress and Anxiety Research Society, Dean of the Faculty for Psychology and Education at the University of Regensburg, and Vice-President for Research at the University of Munich. In an advisory capacity, Pekrun is active in policy development and implementation in education. In 2015, he received the John G. Diefenbaker Award from the Canada Council for the Arts, which acknowledges outstanding research accomplishments across fields in the humanities and social sciences. He is also the recipient of the Sylvia Scribner Award 2017 (American Educational Research Association) and the EARLI Oeuvre Award 2017 (European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction).

Affiliation: Ludwig Maximilians Universitat Munchen

Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany
Professorial Fellow, Institute for Positive Psychology and Education Australian Catholic University Strathfield, NSW 2135, Australia


Henry L. Roediger III

Henry L. Roediger III

Focus of Lecture: Making It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Brain and Cognitive Science

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Affiliation: Washington University in St. Louis


Jérôme Rossier

Jérôme Rossier

Focus of Lecture: Using contextual and personal resources to manager our environmental constraints and design our lives

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Counselling

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Affiliation: University of Lausanne


Urte Scholz

Urte Scholz

Focus of Lecture: Social Relationships and Health Behaviour

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

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Affiliation: University of Zurich


Ralf Schwarzer

Ralf Schwarzer

Focus of Lecture: Health behaviour change: Constructs, mechanisms, interventions

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: Health-compromising behaviors such as physical inactivity and poor dietary habits are difficult to change. Most social-cognitive theories assume that an individual’s intention to change is the best direct predictor of actual change. But people often do not behave in accordance with their intentions. This discrepancy between intention and behavior is due to several reasons. For example, unforeseen barriers could emerge, or people might give in to temptations. Therefore, intention needs to be supplemented by other, more proximal factors that might compromise or facilitate the translation of intentions into action. Some of these postintentional factors have been identified, such as perceived self-efficacy, action control, and strategic planning. They help to bridge the intention-behavior gap. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) suggests a distinction between (a) preintentional motivation processes that lead to a behavioral intention, and (b) postintentional volition processes that lead to the actual health behavior. In this presentation, the theory is explained, and a few example studies are reported that examine the role of volitional mediators in the initiation and adherence to health behaviors. Findings from intervention studies on dental hygiene, physical activity, dietary habits, sunscreen use, vaccination, dust mask wearing, and hand hygiene are presented. Studies were conducted in Iran, Germany, Thailand, Costa Rica, Poland, China, and India. The focus is on constructs and mechanisms of change such as sequential mediation and moderated mediation. Moreover, psychological issues in the context of digital interventions are addressed. The general aim is to examine the theoretical backdrop of health behavior change. More details about theory and projects http://my.psyc.de.

Bio: Ralf Schwarzer is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the Freie University of Berlin, Germany, and Professor of Psychology at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Wroclaw, Poland.He has received his Ph.D. in 1973 (Kiel), and was appointed Professor of Education in 1974, and Professor of Psychology in 1982 (FU Berlin). After sabbatical leaves at the University of California, Berkeley (1985), and Los Angeles (1990-1991), he was Visiting Professor at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (1994-1995), and at York University, Canada (1998) where he served as Adjunct Professor. He has published more than 500 papers, and has co-founded three journals: (a) Anxiety, Stress, and Coping: An International Journal, (b) Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie, and (c) Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being (currently Editor-in-Chief). He is Past-President of the Stress and Anxiety Research Society (STAR), Past-President of the European Health Psychology Society (EHPS), and Past-President of the Health Psychology Division of the International Association for Applied Psychology (IAAP). His research focus lies on health behaviours, stress, coping, social support, self-efficacy, psychological assessment, and digital interventions. In 2007, he received the German Psychology Award. He was one of the organizers of the International Congress of Psychology (ICP) in Berlin 2008. In 2010, he received the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP).
Website: http://my.psyc.de

Affiliation: Freie Universität Berlin, Germany


Stephen Sireci

Stephen Sireci

Focus of Lecture: Do Educational Tests Do More Good Than Harm? Criticisms, Benefits, and Evidence

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: Educational tests are often lauded by policy makers and are valued for providing objective information. Purported benefits of testing include improving instruction; improving educational systems; providing important feedback to teachers, parents, and students; improving decisions regarding admissions and course placement, and protecting the public (e.g., licensure testing). However, there are well-known criticisms of educational tests that refute these claims and argue that educational tests may cause more harm than good. In this presentation, I will discuss the purported benefits and criticisms of educational tests, and discuss how we can evaluate the validity of these claims. I will also summarize evidence for and against the utility of educational tests. Conclusions will be drawn from this evidence, and suggestions for future research and practice in educational assessment will be provided.

Bio: Stephen G. Sireci, Ph.D. is Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Educational Assessment in the College of Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He earned his Ph.D. in psychometrics from Fordham University and his master and bachelor degrees in psychology from Loyola College in Maryland. Before UMASS, he was Senior Psychometrician at the GED Testing Service, Psychometrician for the Uniform CPA Exam and Research Supervisor of Testing for the Newark NJ Board of Education. He is known for his research in evaluating test fairness, particularly issues related to content validity, test bias, cross-lingual assessment, standard setting, and computerized-adaptive testing. He is the author of over 130 publications and conference papers, and is the co-architect of the Massachusetts Adult Proficiency Tests. He is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association and a Fellow of Division 5 of the American Psychological Association. Formerly, he was President of the Northeastern Educational Research Association (NERA), Co-Editor of the International Journal of Testing, a Senior Scientist for the Gallup Organization and a member of the Board of Directors for the National Council on Measurement in Education. He has received several awards from UMass including the College of Education’s Outstanding Teacher Award, the Chancellor’s Medal, the Conti Faculty Fellowship, and a Public Engagement Fellowship. He also received the Thomas Donlon Award for Distinguished Mentoring and the Leo Doherty Award for Outstanding Service from NERA, and the Samuel J. Messick Memorial Lecture Award from Educational Testing Service and the International Language Testing Association in 2017. Professor Sireci reviews articles for over a dozen professional journals and he is on the editorial boards of Applied Measurement in Education, Educational Assessment, Educational and Psychological Measurement, and Psicothema.

Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst


Kazuhisa Takemura

Kazuhisa Takemura

Focus of Lecture: Good decision: A behavioral economic perspective

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

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Affiliation: Professor of Psychology, Waseda University,
Director, Institute of Decision Research, Waseda University


Robert J. Vallerand

Robert J. Vallerand

Focus of Lecture: The role of passion in people's life

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

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Affiliation: Université du Quebec at Montreal


Robert Wood

Robert Wood

Focus of Lecture: TBC

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Div 1: Organizational

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Affiliation: University of Melbourne