Invited Congress Speakers


IAAP DIVISION / CPA SECTION INVITED SPEAKERS

IAAP Division 1: Work and Organizational Psychology

CPA Section: Industrial / Organizational Psychology

CPA Section: Psychology in the Military

     

IAAP Division 2: Psychological Assessment and Evaluation

    CPA Section: Educational and School Psychology

    IAAP Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development

    CPA Section: Social and Personality

      IAAP Division 4: Environmental Psychology

      CPA Section: Environmental Psychology

        IAAP Division 5: Educational, Instructional and School Psychology

        CPA Section: Educational and School Psychology

          CPA Section: Teaching of Psychology

            IAAP Division 6: Clinical and Community Psychology

            CPA Section: Clinical Psychology

            CPA Section: Community Psychology

              CPA Section: Clinical Neuropsychology

              IAAP Division 7: Applied Gerontology

                CPA Section: Adult Development and Aging

                  CPA Section: Psychologists and Retirement

                  IAAP Division 8: Health Psychology

                  CPA Section: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine

                  IAAP Division 9: Economic Psychology

                   

                  IAAP Division 10: Psychology and Law

                    CPA Section: Criminal Justice Psychology

                      IAAP Division 11: Political Psychology

                        CPA Section: Social and Personality

                          CPA Section: Extremism and Terrorism

                            IAAP Division 12: Sport Psychology

                            CPA Section: Sport and Exercise Psychology

                            IAAP Division 13: Traffic and Transportation Psychology

                            IAAP Division 14: Applied Cognitive Psychology

                              CPA Section: Brain & Cognitive Science

                              IAAP Division 15: Psychology Students

                                CPA Section: Students

                                IAAP Division 16: Counseling Psychology

                                CPA Section: Counselling Psychology

                                IAAP Division 17: Professional Psychology

                                CPA Section: Psychologists in Hospitals and Health Centers

                                  IAAP Division 18: History of Applied Psychology

                                    CPA Section: History and Philosophy Section

                                     

                                      CPA Section: Aboriginal Psychology

                                      • Jeff Ansloos Section Invited Keynote/Featured Speaker Address
                                      • Lynn Lavallee Section Invited Keynote/Featured Speaker Address

                                      CPA Section: Addiction Psychology

                                        CPA Section: Developmental Psychology

                                        CPA Section: Family Psychology

                                        CPA Section: International and Cross-Cultural Psychology

                                          CPA Section: Psychopharmacology

                                            CPA Section: Quantitative Electrophysiology

                                            CPA Section: Quantitative Methods

                                              CPA Section: Rural and Northern Psychology

                                              CPA Section: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

                                              CPA Section: Traumatic Stress

                                              • Alain Brunet Section Invited Keynote/Featured Speaker Address
                                              • Bruno Millet Section Invited Keynote/Featured Speaker Address

                                              CPA Section: Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP)


                                              IAAP Division 1: Work & Organizational Psychology


                                              Gary Latham

                                              Gary Latham

                                              Presidential Address: New Robust Findings on the Primed Goal-Organizational Behavior Relationship

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 1: Work & Organizational Psychology

                                              Abstract: Controversy continues to exist around goal priming interventions. I will discuss findings from 2011 to the present on the primed goal-job performance and customer satisfaction relationship and explain why in the field of organizational psychology these findings replicate.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Rotman University Toronto



                                              Stephane Cote

                                              Stephane Cote

                                              Title: Emotional Intelligence in Organizations: A Review of 25 Years of Theoretical Advances and Empirical Findings

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 1: Work & Organizational Psychology

                                              Abstract: Emotional intelligence (EI) is a set of abilities that pertain to emotions and emotional information. Applied psychology research has clarified the definition of EI and illuminated its role in organizations. In this presentation, I will define EI and describe the abilities that constitute it. I will review the findings about how EI is associated with work criteria, organizing the findings according to three overarching models: the validity generalization, situation-specific, and moderator models. I will identify controversies in this area, describe how findings address some controversies, and propose future research to address those that remain. I will conclude by listing best practices for future research on the role of EI in organizations.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Toronto Rotman School of Management


                                              Julie McCarthy

                                              Chair: Julie McCarthy

                                              Session Title: Meet the Editors

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 1: Work & Organizational Psychology

                                              Abstract: The purpose of this session is for conference participants to meet the editors of several top-tier journals in the field of Work and Organizational Psychology and learn more about the journal submission and review process. This is a session where everyone should feel comfortable and “safe” to ask what they’ve always wanted to know about the journal submission process. Editors will begin by presenting a 5-minute summary of their respective journals to maximize time for audience participation. Panelists will then be asked to comment on the following areas: journal fit; characteristics of an ideal paper, the review process, what reviewers can do, and ethical considerations. This session will include editors and associate editors from some of the top international journals in Work and Organizational Psychology.

                                              Panelists:
                                              Gilad Chen, University of Maryland - Editor: Journal of Applied Psychology
                                              Kevin Daniels, University of East Anglia - Editor: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
                                              Maria Kraimer, University of Oregon - Editor: Personnel Psychology
                                              Gary Latham, University of Toronto - Editor: Organizational Dynamics
                                              Scott Tonidandel, Davidson College - Associate Editor: Journal of Business and Psychology and Organizational Research Methods
                                              Ute Stephan, Aston University - Editor: Applied Psychology: An International Review

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Julie McCarthy - University of Toronto


                                              Lynda Zugec

                                              Chair: Lynda Zugec

                                              Session Title: Removing Barriers for Women: How to Advance Women in Organizations

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 1: Work & Organizational Psychology

                                              Abstract: Despite women’s advances in the paid labour force and increasing access to non-traditional careers, they are still underrepresented in roles of power and authority all over the world – particularly in top leadership roles. Although society, policy makers and businesses agree that there is a problem, the cure to fixing women’s underrepresentation has not been found, despite organizations investing in policies and practices to promote gender equality and women’s advancement. Research suggests that as women enter and navigate the labyrinth of leadership, they are faced with a number of complex and intertwined challenges and barriers - including structural barriers, cultural barriers, and organizational barriers, all contributing to womens underrepresentation in leadership.
                                              This panel brings together leading scholars and practitioners to discuss issues of gender and leadership. In doing so, this forum aims to facilitate a fruitful and knowledgeable exchange around the question of how barriers for women within organizations can be successfully removed. The five panelists will bring diverse perspectives and experiences. They have researched and carried out consulting on topics such as gender bias, women’s identity development and management, diversity and inclusion in organizational settings, and best practices of diversity interventions and talent management for women in organizational settings. They will discuss the initiatives, practices, and policies in organizations that have helped to reduce or even eliminate gender barriers. They will also address the key challenges to promoting gender equality and gender-balance in leadership. The panel will engage the audience in an interactive dialogue on the current trends, challenges, and future needs for both science and practice.

                                              Panelists:
                                              Kimberlea Baron - Organizational Psychologist and Partner, SPB Organizational Psychology
                                              Hazel McLaughlin - Partner, OE Cam LLP - Organisation Effectiveness Cambridge
                                              Virginia E. Schein - Professor, University of Pennsylvania
                                              Kristyn Scott - Associate Professor, Ryerson University
                                              Winny Shen - Assistant Professor, University of Waterloo

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Lynda Zugec - Managing Director, The Workforce Consultants


                                              SpeakerName

                                              Chairs: Alicia Grandey & Julie McCarthy

                                              Session Title: Work-Family Interface Around the World: Science and Practice

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 1: Work & Organizational Psychology

                                              Abstract: Around the world, the experience of work-family conflict and stress for men and women continues to be an issue, with personal, organizational, and societal consequences. At the same time, there are cultural differences in work-family policies and practices implemented at the organizational and societal level. This panel aims to bring together scholars who have taken a global and multilevel perspective in studying work-family polices and ways to reduce the strain of these multiple roles. It includes five panelists who are leaders in global work-family experiences and practices, and have written books and engaged in scholarship studying and comparing work-family interface in countries around the world. As a group, their research utilizes a multi-level, theoretically based approach, with several engaged in collaborative, multicultural teams gathering data that are both qualitative and quantitative and both micro and macro-level in nature. Discussion will address current trends, challenges, and future needs for both science and practice.

                                              Panelists:
                                              Tammy Allen - Professor, University of Southern Florida
                                              Laura den Dulk - Professor, Erasmus University Rotterdam
                                              Karen Korabik - Professor, University of Guelph
                                              Ariane Ollier-Malaterre - Professor, University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM)
                                              Mina Westman - Professor, Tel Aviv University

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Alicia Grandey - Pennsylvania State University
                                              Julie McCarthy - University of Toronto


                                              IAAP Division 2: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation


                                              IAAP Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development


                                              Janak Pandey

                                              Janak Pandey

                                              Presidential Address: Evolving Dimensions of Psychology and Societal Development

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development

                                              Abstract: The objectives of IAAP Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development are to study and apply psychological knowledge for resolving problems related to societal development and change. The division promotes and provides platform for exchange of research ideas and findings for understanding and range of issues related to socio-economic inequality, deprivation, poverty, discrimination and injustice particularly to vulnerable sections of society and suggest policy change and action plan for societal development. On completion of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2015, the United Nations adopted the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2016, to be achieved by 2030. These developmental goals are related to issues like gender quality, eradication of poverty, meaningful work, subjective well-being, a safe work environment to improve quality of life. The IAAP has pronounced its policy to follow the best available scientific evidence to foster societal dialogue about science practice and innovation to promote the psychological findings for sustainable development internationally. Psychology is unique in possessing theories, concepts and methods which may competently deal with individuals and their groups and their influences on social, environment, organizations and institutions. Unlike other social sciences, psychology, competently deal with micro –social issues and impact of macro processes on individuals in the society, enhancing our understanding of both social systems and individuals. The paper specifically examines evolving dimensions of psychology and societal development in the Indian context.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Allahabad


                                              Purnima Singh

                                              Purnima Singh

                                              Title of Symposium: Shared Social Spaces: Crossing Boundaries and Barriers

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development

                                              Abstract: Shared social spaces provide members from different communities with opportunities to meaningfully engage with each other. Such spaces offer occasions for people to come together, feel the closeness and engage in acts of reciprocity, cooperation and mutual celebration. Such spaces are needed in plural societies as they allow members from diverse groups to cross the boundaries created due to their group based identities. When boundaries become barriers the scope and range of shared spaces shrinks. Contrarily the boundaries that work as bridges increase the possibility and opportunity of shared spaces. Plural societies with their diversity have the potential for the possibility of shared spaces, however, such possibilities may be weakened due to emphasis on monolithic identities and denial of choices to people.This paper examines the shared spaces in contemporary Indian society. - A series of studies qualitative and quantitative, textual analysis and case studies were conducted to examine shared spaces in different contexts and for various social groups. Data from our studies showed various shades of acceptance and exclusion prevalent in the society. Traditional shared spaces were shrinking but new one’s were seen as emerging. When people criss crossed boundaries they develop expanded shared spaces. Different forms of behaviours, such as sharing, helping, supporting, bonding etc., were exhibited by people when shared spaces expanded and these facilitated social harmony.' Barriers’, were seen in the form of difficulties, anxieties, mistrust etc., impacting social living.These findings are suggestive for understanding inter group relations with implications for policy formulations for societies of diverse nature.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: IIT Delhi


                                              Janak Pandey

                                              Janak Pandey

                                              Title of Symposium: Sustainable Societal Development

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development

                                              Symposium Summary and Aims: The IAAP plays a significant role in promoting applications of psychology through liaison activities with UNO .The IAAP has been making efforts to convince the UN with positive roles psychology can play in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) identified by the UN for the period 2016 to 2030.One major concern of the SDGs is related to harmony in societies with diversities .Most of the societies in contemporary world are diverse and they face problems related to their peaceful co-existence with productivity. The proposed symposium is planned to present and discuss recent psychological science contributions related to social plurality and diversity leading to suggestions for policy measures to build sustainable harmonious societies with equal opportunities for economic prosperity, political participation and human development for all sections in national development.

                                              Participants:

                                              1. Prof. John Berry (Canada & Russia)
                                              2. Prof. Steve Reicher (UK)
                                              3. Prof. R.C .Tripathi (India)
                                              4. Prof. Rolando Diaz-Loving (Mexico)
                                              5. Prof. Janak Pandey, Discussant (India)

                                              Presenter: Prof. John Berry (Canada & Russia)

                                              Title: Mutual Intercultural Relations and Sustainable Development

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                                              Abstract: There is probably no more serious challenge to attaining social stability and cohesion in the contemporary world than the management of intercultural relations within culturally plural societies. These goals are important to achieve because they underpin sustainable human development. The successful attainment of these goals depends on many factors, including psychological features of the groups that are in contact. With a team of international colleagues, we have been carrying out a project that seeks to provide research into these issues by examining three core psychological hypotheses of intercultural relations in 17 culturally plural societies. The main goal of the project is to evaluate three hypotheses across societies in order to identify some basic psychological principles that may underlie successful intercultural relations. The eventual goal is to employ the findings to propose some policies and programmes that may improve the quality ofinter cultural relationships as a basis for sustainable human development globally.

                                              Affiliation: Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, and Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation


                                              Presenter: Steve Reicher (UK)

                                              Title: Not in our name’: contesting the claim that diversity undermines social cohesion

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                                              Abstract: One of the core claims of anti-immigration discourse in Europe is the social-psychological idea that diversity will undermine social cohesion. The claim is widely disseminated across the political spectrum and is associated with the notion of a ‘progressive dilemma’ whereby immigration is argued to weaken the willingness of the population to support redistributive social welfare policies. In this talk, I shall challenge these ideas. I shall provide a range of evidence – quantitative and qualitative, experimental and ethnographic, contemporary and historical - to show that diversity need not undermine group cohesion and can even enhance it. Indeed in some circumstances, diversity is definitional of group identity and hence provides the basis of cohesion. I shall show that diversity only becomes a problem when it takes forms that are specifically at odds with the definition of group identity. It follows that those who argue that particular forms of diversity (notably, ethnicity) are necessarily corrosive of group identity cohesion presuppose that such (ethnic) identity is necessarily the basis of group formation and social stratification. In this sense, they can be seen as ethnic entrepreneurs – producing ethnic polarization under the guise of describing ‘natural’ group processes.

                                              Affiliation: Wardlaw Professor of Psychology, University of St Andrews , UK


                                              Presenter: R. C. Tripathi (India)

                                              Title: Lessons from a sustainable freedom initiative in Indian Villages

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                                              Abstract: This presentation will focus on drawing lessons from a social intervention which was made to free a group of farmers, who were under debt bondage, in a town of Central India. After they became free, a planned effort was made to make this diverse group of farmers economically self- sufficient through their membership of SHGs. These farmers have recently come together to form a producers company which engages in organic farming. The question which we ask is what role is played by social capital which may have come to be created in this process and its implications for working towards sustainable livelihood and also towards development of sustainability orientation with their involvement in organic farming compared to those who are not. I shall draw attention to one major lesson that it is the bonding social capital that enhances sustainability orientation of farmers, while bridging social capital has the opposite effect. Altruism and greed, a driver of free market ideology, are found not associated with sustainability orientation.

                                              Affiliation: University of Allahabad, India


                                              Presenter: Rolando Diaz-Loving (Mexico)

                                              Title: Culture and health: examples from Mexican ethnopsychology

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                                              Abstract: Research on DNA sequences in humans has been labeled one of the most important scientific breakthroughs in science. We now know that human beings share 99.9% of their genetic makeup. Given such remarkable stability, one could ask where all the differences and variability in human behavior do and attributes come from. One possible inroad would be to recognize the effects of culture. In order to achieve the goal of including culture, exploratory methods, bottom up techniques, and culturally based constructs and manifestations of behavior are proposed in a series of phenomena. The basic tenant is that diagnosis, interventions and evaluations must not only be valid and reliable, but also culturally relevant an sensitive. Specifically dealing with health, we will present research on condom use, sustainable interpersonal relationships, teeth brushing in children and chest screening in females using ethno psychological based constructs and methodologies with Mexican populations.

                                              Affiliation: National Autonomous University of Mexico


                                              Discussant: Janak Pandey, (India)


                                              IAAP Division 4: Environmental Psychology


                                              Wesley Schulz

                                              Wesley Schulz

                                              Presidential Address: Scaling Psychological Science To Achieve Large-scale Change

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

                                              Abstract: Achieving a sustainable future will require changes in human behavior. In short, the planet cannot continue to support our current levels of consumption indefinitely, and achieving a sustainable future will require that individuals change their patterns of behavior. Psychological science stands at the forefront in efforts to create effective behavior-change programs, and nearly 50 years of research has explored topics like energy conservation, recycling, transportation choices, and water efficiency. But our focus on individual-level actions has led some to refer to psychological approaches as "piecemeal", "small scale", and "narrow." Some have even questioned whether psychological science has anything to contribute to sustainability efforts at all, since environmental issues are typically massive in scale, and each individual's contribution to solving these problems is small. This talk highlights the scalability of psychological science, and argues that individual-level analyses are critical to informing efforts for large-scale change. Examples are drawn from programs designed to reduce electricity consumption, improve transportation efficiency, and promote more efficient uses of water.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: California State University


                                              Elke Weber

                                              Elke Weber

                                              Keynote Address: Giving the Future a Chance

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

                                              Abstract: Bounded rationality and finite processing capacity result in homo sapiens focusing attention first on the here and now.  But many individual and social problems require attention to future costs and benefits, with climate change the most urgent challenge for decisions that fully and justly weigh immediate and certain costs and benefits of business-as-usual or greenhouse gas mitigation efforts against delayed, risky, and often disputed costs and benefits. Psychological theories from prospect theory to hyperbolic discounting and query theory predict that future costs of business-as-usual and future benefits of GHG mitigation efforts will typically get short thrift in such decisions. I present data for three interventions that focus greater attention on future consequences and thus provide entry points for choices that better balance short- and long-term goals and objectives.  (1) In tradeoffs between immediate and delayed consumption, discounting of future consequences is reduced when choice options with future benefits are made the default and when decision makers are prompted to consider arguments for such choices first (Weber et al., 2007).  (2) Individual and country-level data show that citizens may use perceptions of their country's age to predict its future continuation, with longer pasts predicting longer futures, and longer futures justifying greater investments into sustainability. Thus framing a country as a long-standing entity can promote pro-environmental behavior (Hershfield, Bang, and Weber, 2014). (3) Finally, individuals' motivation to leave a positive legacy can be leveraged to increase engagement with climate change and other environmental problems (Zaval, Markowitz and Weber, 2015).

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Princeton University


                                              Thomas Dietz & Linda Steg

                                              Thomas Dietz & Linda Steg

                                              Title of Symposium: The Psychology of Global Environmental Change: An Examination of the Contributions of Paul Stern

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

                                              Abstract: Paul Stern has initiated several major lines of research related to global environmental change. This symposium is dedicated to his important contribution at the intersection between psychological theory and efforts to address environmental and sustainability problems. We provide an overview of the key themes in his research, discussing particularly how psychology can address global environmental change. Four themes will be emphasized. Stern was one of the first social psychologists to develop models of household energy consumption. That work matured into the concept of the "behavioral wedge" which quantifies both the impact of a behavior on greenhouse gas emissions, and the ease with which that change can be promoted. This work has led to design principles for policies to encourage household energy efficiency. Besides, Stern was an initiator of the Values-Beliefs-Norms (VBN) theory of environmental decision-making. VBN theory draws attention to the importance of values in environmental psychology and initiated the distinction between altruistic values that are concerned with other humans and biospheric values that are concerned with other species and the biosphere. Furthermore, he has been a pioneer in linking scientific analysis with public deliberation in policy processes, an approach frequently invoked in policy advice offered by the US National Academies of Science. Finally, through work with Ostrom and others Stern developed a major synthesis of our understanding of common pool resource governance. In the symposium, five presenters (including a discussant) will review briefly these major themes, assess the current state of the science regarding them, and suggest future directions.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Thomas Dietz - Michigan State University


                                              Florian Kaiser

                                              Florian Kaiser

                                              Title of Symposium: Environmental Attitude: Troublemaker or Silver Bullet

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

                                              Abstract: After more than four decades of psychological research on environmental attitude dating back to two studies by Michael Maloney and colleagues in 1973 and 1975, many lessons have already been learned. Nevertheless, our discipline has not yet made up its mind about whether environmental attitude is an unnecessary troublemaker—more or less irrelevant for behavior—or the silver bullet—crucial for fundamental change in people’s behavior and lifestyles. In this symposium, leading proponents of attitude research present their evidence-based ideas that describe how environmental attitude translates into action and even into lasting changes in people’s lives.
                                              Jeff Joireman, Washington State University, Pullman (WA), U.S.A., explores the importance of people’s environmental attitude—approximated with people’s consideration of future consequences (CFC)—for their voting preferences in two U.S. presidential elections. Kim-Pong Tam, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, finds that culture and cultural factors are underappreciated in their ability to offer a better understanding of the role of attitude in behavior. Florian Kaiser and Laura Henn, Otto-von-Guericke University in Magdeburg, Germany, uncover the two roles that environmental attitude plays in behavioral choices and consumption restraint. Taciano Milfont, Victoria University of Wellington, and Chris Sibley, University of Auckland, both New Zealand, examine longitudinal change in environmental attitude and the degree to which the influence of environmental attitude on behavior varies over time.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany

                                              Presenter: Jeff Joireman

                                              Title: CFC-Future Subscale Outperforms CFC-Immediate Subscale in Environmental (and Political) Domains: Data from Two U.S. Presidential Elections

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                                              Abstract: In their 2012 meta-analysis, Milfont, Wilson, and Diniz reported a significant relationship between scores on Strathman et al.’s (1994) consideration of future consequences (CFC) scale and environmental attitudes and behaviors (r = .28). While informative, previous research has not systematically examined which CFC subscale (CFC-Future, CFC-Immediate) is the best predictor in environmental (or political) domains. Accordingly, we report surveys conducted prior to two U.S. presidential elections (2008, 2012). Both studies show (1) CFC-Future is the only significant predictor of environmental values and the importance placed on environmental issues in the election; and (2) CFC-Future is more strongly related to voting preferences. Indirect effects testing further revealed that CFC-Future predicts environmental values which predict the importance voters place on environmental issues in the election which predicts preference for the liberal candidate. In conclusion, research supports the value of distinguishing between the CFC-Future and CFC-Immediate subscales in environmental (and political) domains.

                                              Affiliation: Washington State University


                                              Presenter: Kim-Pong Tam

                                              Title: Uncovering The Role Of Culture In Phenomena Regarding Environmental Concern

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                                              Abstract: Mitigation of global environmental problems requires a concerted effort by people all over the world. For this to happen, it is imperative to understand to what extent people in different societies respond to environmental problems in a similar or different manner. However, this understanding is largely lacking because prior studies on related topics have mostly used participants from Western societies only. In this talk, with reference to an ongoing program of studies that makes use of data from international survey programs and cross-cultural psychology research, I will show that there are substantial cross-national variations in some phenomena regarding environmental concern (e.g., gender differences in environmental concern, the gap between environmental concern and pro-environmental behavior), and demonstrate the utility of cultural factors (e.g., individualism-collectivism, trust, time orientation), along with social institutional factors (e.g., economic development, gender inequality), in explaining such variations. This research program attests to the viability of a research focus that explicitly incorporates the role of culture into the understanding of human responses to environmental problems. Findings from studies subscribing to this focus will enable environmental practitioners to develop culturally informed strategies.

                                              Affiliation: The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong


                                              Presenter: Florian G. Kaiser & Laura Henn

                                              Title: The Role Of Attitude In Choosing Behavior And In Restraining Consumption

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                                              Abstract: Restrained, sustainable consumption depends on proper behavioral choices and on the rigor with which a person implements these choices. In our presentation, we present detailed evidence for a novel model that describes not only why people choose a particular behavior but also the psychological requirements for this behavior to effectively translate into restrained consumption.
                                              In contrast to several prominent models in environmental psychology, we believe in the compensatory interplay between a persons environmental attitude (i.e., attitude toward environmental protection) and the behavioral costs involved when people select a specific behavior. Drawing on lab and field experiments involving self-reported and observed behavior, we exclusively found that the two main effects—behavioral costs and individual environmental attitude—represent the origins behind a person’s more sustainable choice. In all our studies, the traditionally predicted interaction effect was never significantly different from zero.
                                              Behavior-change measures, such as smart-meter-based feedback, do not work equally well for everyone. Thus, we argue that a behavior’s significance for effectively saving energy—and for any other form of environmental impact—depends on the rigor with which the sustainable behavior is implemented. In a quasi-experiment, we expectedly found that a behavior’s significance for saving energy was moderated by the extent of the person’s environmental attitude. Obviously, people’s attitudes control not only _what_ they do, but also _how_ they do it—the rigor with which a person implements behavior. To effectively restrain consumption, environmental attitude is essential as we need people to make proper choices and to rigorously implement these behaviors.

                                              Affiliation: Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany


                                              Presenter: Taciano L. Milfont & Chris G. Sibley

                                              Title: Do Environmental Attitudes Change Over Time?

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                                              Abstract: Environmental attitudes are a central construct in our field, but most studies have relied on cross-sectional data. In this talk, we describe findings from a research program examining the extent to which environmental attitudes change over time. In particular, we examine how beliefs and attitudes about climate change and the environment have changed from 2009-2016 using data from the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (NZAVS)--a 20-year longitudinal national probability study of social attitudes, personality and health outcomes. The NZAVS has randomly sampled more than 20,000 New Zealanders and followed the same group of roughly 15,000 each year from 2009-2016. We constructed a series of Latent Growth Models to assess change over time. These models show that the belief that climate change is occurring, and the belief that such change is caused by humans, increased over the 2009-2016 period. In contrast to the rising belief in climate change, the belief that one's personal actions could do anything to help protect the environment have remained unchanged over time, and even dipped slightly in some years. Willingness to make personal sacrifices (such as driving less, accepting higher prices) to help protect the environment have increased only slightly, and reports of having actually made sacrifices to help protect the environment have declined at a greater rate. We will also model longitudinal relations between willingness to make personal sacrifices for environmental protection and having made sacrifices for environmental protection. We will discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings.

                                              Affiliation: Taciano L. Milfont, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
                                              Chris G. Sibley, University of Auckland, New Zealand


                                              Tobias Brosch

                                              Tobias Brosch

                                              Title of Symposium: Determinants of Sustainable Consumer Decision Making

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

                                              Abstract: Developing a more sustainable lifestyle is becoming one of the most urgent challenges of our times. Success will depend not only on the development of new technologies, but also on major changes in the patterns of individual consumption behavior. It is thus important to gain a better understanding of the interplay of psychological mechanisms driving the decision-making processes that determine our resource consumption. In this symposium, we bring together five state-of-the-art presentations illustrating recent developments in this area of research. Jiaying Zhao (University of British Columbia) will present empirical evidence illustrating how financial scarcity and environmental resource scarcity shape conservation choices and motivations. Tobias Brosch (University of Geneva) will present a series of studies addressing the role of affective responses in environmental decision-making. Amanda Carrico (University of Colorado) will present a meta-analysis as well as empirical data investigating the mechanisms underlying pro-environmental spillover. Stephanie Mertens (University of Geneva) will present a series of studies investigating the role of information presentation in guiding consumers towards sustainable purchase decisions. Nadia Contzen (University of Groningen) will present research investigating consumer preferences for sustainable innovations. Taken together, the presentations in this symposium illustrate the latest developments in research on the psychological determinants of sustainable consumer decision-making, and will open up new avenues for targeted intervention strategies promoting more sustainable decisions and behaviors.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Geneva, Switzerland


                                              Sabine Pahl & Linda Steg

                                              Sabine Pahl & Linda Steg

                                              Title of Symposium: Emerging Topics and Approaches

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

                                              Abstract: This symposium brings together researchers working on emerging topics and approaches in environmental risk. The focus is particularly on climate change, natural hazards and marine pollution. Climate change has been researched for a number of years and is at the point of requiring consolidating analyses and large scale data to answer emerging questions. Anne van Valkengoed and Linda Steg will present a series of meta-analyses identifying important variables associated with climate change adaptation. These analyses identify 11 variables ranging from risk perceptions to place attachment and social norms. Thijs Bouman and colleagues will report results from a recent survey covering 18 European countries that investigates the links between values, climate change concerns, personal responsibility and actions. Marino Bonaiuto will move the focus onto natural hazards, taking a multi-country perspective on the crucial role of place attachment for risk perception and coping behaviour. Sabine Pahl will introduce the emerging topic of marine litter and plastic pollution, reporting results from 16 European countries that focus on people's awareness of the issue and on predictors of intentions to act such as perceived responsibility, exposure to litter and social norms. Finally, Kayleigh Wyles will discuss the potential of citizen science approaches in engaging people with environmental risks, especially focusing on the example of marine litter. She will explore potential underlying processes such as nature connectedness. This symposium will stress both the importance and challenges of interdisciplinary and policy-focused work and discuss the developing role of Environmental Psychologists in dealing with rapid global environmental change.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Sabine Pahl - University of Plymouth, United Kingdom


                                              IAAP Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional


                                              Andrew Martin

                                              Andrew Martin

                                              Presidential Address: Interpersonal Relationships and Students' Academic and Personal Wellbeing

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional

                                              Abstract: This address draws on a number of large-scale research projects investigating the shared and unique influence of diverse interpersonal relationships on students academic and personal wellbeing. Data are presented exploring the distinct impact of same-sex and opposite-sex peers, parents and teachers on academic buoyancy, motivation, engagement, classroom climate, school attendance, achievement, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and mental health. The presentation concludes with a discussion of the role of diverse sources of interpersonal relatedness to optimally map onto the many important factors that traverse student development.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of New South Wales, Australia


                                              Fred Guay

                                              Fred Guay

                                              Keynote Address: Motivation at School: Between and Within School Subjects' Specificity Matter in the Prediction of Outcomes

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional

                                              Abstract: According to some motivational theories, such outcomes as achievement and performance are best predicted by motivational variables measured at the same level of generality. For example, a measure of motivation specific to math, and not a global measure of motivation at school, should be the best predictor of math achievement. Indeed, global measures do not consider the complexity and variation of self-perceptions, and this could impair the ability to understand and predict behavior. Therefore, scales measuring important areas of life would be more useful than global scales for understanding the consequences pertaining to area-specific self-related constructs. Such specificity principles (i.e., level of specificity-global vs. specific and area of specificity) imply that knowledge of the determinants of students’ achievement relies on an understanding of subject-bound dynamics. Various studies stemming from different motivational theories have applied these principles and have shown that a large portion of motivational variance is specific to school subjects. However, a survey of the field reveals a dearth in self-determination theory research testing the specificity principles and, consequently, limited knowledge of motivational dynamics. In this talk, I uncover fundamental processes in the way each type of motivation (intrinsic, identified, external, control) toward various school subjects predicts outcomes in these subjects and others. This analysis could lead to important discoveries regarding area (types of school subjects) and level specificity (global vs. specific) of motivation and broaden our understanding of student motivation and the associated outcomes.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Département des fondements et pratiques en éducation, Pavillon des sciences de l'éducation
                                              Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada


                                              Andrew Martin

                                              Lia Daniels

                                              Title of Symposium: Teacher Motivation: A Promising Path to Supporting Teacher Wellness

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional

                                              Symposium summary and aims: Research on teacher motivation is rapidly growing. A shared interest in the effects of teacher motivation on both teachers’ wellbeing and their professional practice/development unite the papers in this invited symposium. Participants include preservice and practicing teachers from Canada and Australia. Each paper quantitatively examines the effect of teacher motivation on important outcomes including burnout, commitment, professional development, and teaching strategies. In 15mins each presenter will describe his/her theoretical approach to teacher motivation and results. Dr. Lia Daniels will serve as the discussant and will highlight ways motivation theory can support teacher wellness (10mins). There will be 15mins for questions.

                                              List of authors (alphabetical, *denotes presenter)

                                                Keiko C.P. Bostwick, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia*
                                                Rebecca J. Collie, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
                                                Lia M. Daniels, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada
                                                Tracy L. Durksen, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia*
                                                Lauren D. Goegan, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada*
                                                Nathan Hall, PhD, Faculty of Education, McGill University, Quebec, Canada*
                                                Andrew J. Martin, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
                                                Amanda I. Radil, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada*
                                                Lynn Sheridan, School of Education, University of Wollongong, Australia
                                                Sharon Tindall-Ford, School of Education, University of Wollongong, Australia
                                                Chair/Discussant: Lia Daniels, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada

                                              Presenter: Keiko C. P. Bostwick, MAIS

                                              Title: The Role of Gender in Teachers’ Perceived Autonomy Support, Relatedness with Students, Buoyancy, and Organizational Commitment

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                                              Authors: Keiko C. P. Bostwick, MAIS, Rebecca J. Collie, PhD, & Andrew J. Martin, PhD

                                              Institution: University of New South Wales, School of Education

                                              Background: Although researchers have examined teachers’ experiences and outcomes at work, few have considered whether gender plays a role in these and how they are associated. Thus, we examined gender differences in associations among perceived autonomy support (PAS), relatedness with students, workplace buoyancy, and organizational commitment while controlling for covariates.

                                              Methods:. We examined 276 Australian secondary school teachers. Teachers reported on substantive variables and background information (e.g., teaching experience). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine measurement properties and multi-group structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine associations between variables by gender.

                                              Results: CFA results demonstrated measurement invariance across male and female teachers. SEM results showed predominate similarities across gender in associations between substantive variables. Specifically, PAS predicted greater relatedness with students and both predicted organizational commitment. However, for male teachers only, relatedness with students was also positively associated with workplace buoyancy.

                                              Conclusions: Overall, male and female teacher models were broadly invariant with a few notable differences surrounding associations in relatedness with students. We propose that although male and female teachers are likely more similar than they are different, some gender-specific nuances may be present in teachers’ workplace experiences and outcomes.

                                              Impact: For practice, there appears merit for non-gender specific approaches to promoting teachers’ workplace outcomes at a broad level. However, attention towards additional methods for promoting buoyancy among female teachers may also be warranted. For research, more consideration is needed to examine the role of gender in teachers’ experiences and outcomes.


                                              Presenter: Nathan Hall, PhD

                                              Title: Examining the role of motivational strategies in persistence and well-being in practicing teachers

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                                              Author: Nathan Hall, PhD

                                              Institution: McGill University, Montreal, Canada

                                              Background/rationale: Given high rates of teacher attrition in North American schools, the role of motivational variables in predicting teacher persistence and psychological well-being has received increasing research attention. The present study examined how teachers’ self-regulatory use of motivational strategies predicted burnout, job satisfaction, and quitting intentions in practicing Canadian teachers.

                                              Methods: Practicing teachers (N = 513) from Quebec and Ontario (Mage = 41.26 years; 85.2% female) completed an online questionnaire including measures of burnout (Maslach et al., 1996), job satisfaction (Moè et al., 2010), intentions to quit (Hackett et al., 2001), and motivational strategies following teaching-related setbacks (adapted from Heckhausen, 2002).

                                              Results: Hierarchical regressions showed benefits for goal engagement (persistence, help-seeking) and self-protection (positive reappraisal), with disengagement (avoidance, downgrading) negatively impacting well-being. Whereas upward social comparisons (role models) were consistently beneficial (especially for new teachers), downward comparisons (worse-off others) were less effective, with horizontal comparisons (similar peers) showing consistently negative effects.

                                              Conclusions: The present findings provide empirical evidence of the psychological benefits of motivational strategies as proposed in Heckhausen’s life-span theory of motivation for teachers, showing significant effects of varied goal engagement, disengagement, self-protection, and social comparisons strategies on critical persistence and well-being indicators including burnout, job satisfaction, and intentions to quit.

                                              Action/Impact: Given the predictive utility of specific motivational strategies concerning well-being and employment outcomes for practicing teachers, it is recommended that teacher orientation, professional development, and intervention initiatives incorporate a substantive component highlighting adaptive (and potentially maladaptive) motivational strategies in response to teaching-related setbacks, particularly for new teachers.


                                              Presenter: Amanda I. Radil, PhD

                                              Title: The Motivation Design Principles Questionnaire (MDPQ): Evidence of Reliability and Validity

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                                              Authors: Lia M. Daniels, PhD, , and Lauren, D. Goegan, M.Ed.

                                              Institution: University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

                                              Background: Typically teachers’ motivational practices have been measured within a specific theoretical framework (Midgley et al., 2000). Recently, Linnenbrink-Garcia et al. (2016) proposed five design principles supporting student motivation that cut across theories. This theoretical advancement cannot be fully realized until there is a measurement tool to support cross-theory research.

                                              Method: Our purpose was to create and collect evidence of reliability/validity for a quantitative self-report measure of motivation design principles. Items on the Motivation Design Principles Questionnaire (MDPQ) combine teachers’ verbatim open-ended statements and researchers’ perspectives in the areas of Competence, Autonomy, Task Design, Modeling Learning, and Relatedness.

                                              Results: We conducted two quantitative correlational validation studies. In Study 1 (n=157), we used CFA to reduce the number of items. In Study 2 (n=149), we tested competing factor structures and determined that the five-factor structure was the best fit for the data, χ2=179.10, df=94, CFI=.91, RMSEA=.08, SRMR=.08.

                                              Conclusion: Each design principle correlated positively with teaching efficacy, engagement, and enjoyment and negatively with anger. By extension, it seems that application of motivation design principles appears beneficial for teachers’ wellness.

                                              Impact: The field of achievement motivation is deficient in instruments that take a cross-theoretical approach to motivation or that include teachers’ perspectives. Remedying these shortfalls, the MDPQ is the first measurement instrument that represents the design principles and involves teachers’ perspectives. Implications for research and professional development will be discussed.


                                              Presenter: Tracy L. Durksen, PhD

                                              Title: Preservice teachers’ adaptability at two Australian universities: A developmental approach to understanding and promoting adaptive motivation and engagement

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                                              Authors: Tracy L. Durksen1, PhD, Lynn Sheridan2, PhD, and Sharon Tindall-Ford2, PhD.

                                              Institutions: 1School of Education, UNSW Sydney, 2Australia and School of Education, University of Wollongong, Australia

                                              Background/rationale: Despite a clear emphasis on pedagogical and academic growth in Australian initial teacher education (ITE) programs, gaps exist in how to best support non-academic development. Therefore, we sought a better understanding of how to identify and promote the development of non-academic capabilities such as adaptability at the preservice stage.

                                              Methods: Students (N=151) beginning 2-year ITE programs completed one online questionnaire. We used scales with evidence of validity and reliability to measure motivation and engagement, adaptability, efficacy beliefs, and professional engagement with career development aspirations (PEDCA). Participants also responded to scenario-based items about adapting to typical yet challenging teaching situations.

                                              Results: The criterion variable PECDA was regressed on six predictor variables: adaptive motivation, maladaptive motivation, adaptive engagement, maladaptive engagement, adaptability, and efficacy beliefs. Regression analysis revealed a significant relationship (F(6,143)=14.03, p<.000) with efficacy beliefs (β=.32), adaptive engagement (β=.18) and maladaptive engagement (β=-.20) as significant predictors.

                                              Conclusions: Current motivation and engagement of students beginning an elementary or secondary ITE program was positively related to the value they placed on PECDA. Results extend previous findings associating higher adaptability, adaptive engagement, and confidence in capabilities to influence student learning as important indicators of aspirational professional development.

                                              Action/Impact: Next steps include analyzing participants’ responses to scenario-based items for the purposes of developing a non-academic professional development tool for preservice teachers. Related scenario-based results will be highlighted and considered in relation to the current study findings when presenting practical applications for teacher educators seeking to foster prospective teachers’ adaptability.


                                              Catherine F. Ratelle

                                              Catherine F. Ratelle

                                              Title of Symposium: The support of students’ psychological needs and their motivational outcomes: From elementary school to university

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional

                                              Presenters:

                                              1. Frédéric Guay, Université Laval, Canada
                                              2. Anne-Sophie Denault, Université Laval, Canada
                                              3. Julien Chanal, Université de Genève, Switzerland
                                              4. Tanya Chichekian, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada
                                              5. David Litalien, Université Laval, Canada

                                              Convenor: Catherine F. Ratelle, Université Laval, Canada

                                              Symposium Summary and Aims: This session presents research on the satisfaction of students’ psychological needs and the factors promoting it, as well as the academic outcomes that follow psychological need satisfaction. Results from these studies demonstrate the importance of attending to students’ psychological needs within the school context, regardless of the level of schooling. Using different methodologies, researchers have shown the importance of need satisfaction for different, yet important, academic outcomes such as well-being, physical activity, and self-regulation. They also illustrate the importance for students’ academic functioning that significant individuals like teachers, peers, and parents support their psychological needs.

                                              Presenter: Frédéric Guay, Pierre Valois, Erick Falardeau
                                              Université Laval

                                              Title: Motivating elementary school students toward writing: The CASIS professional development program

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                                              Background/rationale: The goal of this presentation is to summarize results from three quasi-experimental longitudinal studies testing the effectiveness of CASIS, an inservice and preservice teachers’ professional development program intended to support students' motivation toward writing. This professional development program is based on self-determination theory.

                                              Methods: The three studies involve preservice and inservice elementary school teachers and their students. In each study, we have a control and an experimental group as well as pretest and post-test assessments. Teachers were videotaped in their classroom giving a writing lesson at the beginning and end of the school year.

                                              Results: Overall, results of these three studies supported the effectiveness of CASIS. Specifically, differences at the post-test were observed between control and experimental groups on most pedagogical practices. Moreover, the natural decline in children’s motivation toward writing was less important in the experimental group than in the control group.

                                              Conclusions: These studies found that the CASIS professional development workshop could be an effective way to improve teachers’ pedagogical practices as well as to prevent students’ natural motivational decline toward writing.

                                              Action/Impact: We encourage elementary school teachers to use the five pedagogical practices embedded in CASIS, namely collaboration, authentic activities, structure, involvement, and support for autonomy during a writing lesson in order to sustain students’ motivation toward writing.


                                              Presenter: Anne-Sophie Denault, Frédéric Guay, Catherine F. Ratelle
                                              Université Laval

                                              Title: Extracurricular activities and perceptions of relatedness to others: Examining the sensitization hypothesis

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                                              Background/rationale: The sensitization hypothesis (Moller et al., 2010) proposes that the more students experience relatedness to others, the more they will want to experience it in future interactions. In other words, basic need satisfaction leads individuals to value continued satisfaction. We examined this hypothesis in relation to extracurricular activities (EA).

                                              Methods: A short longitudinal design with two time points at a one-year interval among a sample of 453 adolescents from disadvantaged neighborhoods (59% girls, Mage = 14.33) was used. High school students completed questionnaires on activity participation and on relatedness to peers in their school and in their EA.

                                              Results: Perceived relatedness to other students at T1 predicted participation in EA at T2. Participation in EA at T2 did not predict an increase in relatedness at T2. To experience such an increase, students had to report higher scores on relatedness to other peers in the activity at T2. Conclusions: Experiencing relatedness in EA was necessary for students to report greater relatedness to other school students one year later. These results extend the literature on specialization and relatedness by showing that students who value relatedness to others will seek other school contexts that can satisfy this need, such as EA.

                                              Action/Impact: EA can provide students the opportunities to interact with new peers and form new friendships that foster greater perceptions of relatedness to other peers at their school. EA could thus be used as an additional strategy to help students connect with their school, especially among students at risk for dropout.


                                              Presenter: Julien Chanal
                                              Université de Genève

                                              Title: Effect of Autonomy-Supportive Climate in Physical Education Class on Youths’ Developmental Trajectories of Physical Activity

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                                              Background/rationale: Lack of physical activity is partly responsible for the obesity pandemic observed around the world. Physical education (PE) permits all children to meet and develop PA habits and motivation. Our study aimed to test the influence of PE teachers on trajectories of children’s motivational resources and physical activity level.

                                              Methods: A study involving thirteen teachers and more than 1000 students was conducted. A multi-wave-multi-cohort accelerated design was used. Measures of students’ motivational resources were assessed via questionnaires and PA via accelerometers. Teachers’ behaviors were assessed by children and teachers via questionnaires, but also objectively through videotapes of PE lessons.

                                              Results: Results demonstrated that PA and motivational resources decline over school years. Moreover, our results emphasize the role of teacher autonomy-supportive style. Differences between self-reported, perceived, and observed teachers style on trajectories were also found. Teachers’ behaviors were responsible for part of the trajectories of students’ PA and motivational resources.

                                              Conclusions: Youths’ habits are an important determinant of adult habits. Therefore, teachers could strengthen motivation for PA or reduce the decline over years by creating a more autonomy-supportive climate in their lessons.

                                              Action/Impact: Professional development programs intended to support students’ motivation toward PA, based on self-determination theory, could reduce the effect of physical inactivity on obesity.


                                              Presenter: Tanya Chichekian and Robert J. Vallerand
                                              Université du Québec à Montréal

                                              Title: On the Role of Passion in Science Education

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                                              Background/rationale: The Dualistic Model of Passion (DMP) (Vallerand, 2015) posits that, contrary to obsessive passion, harmonious passion leads to more adaptive outcomes. We explored the role of teacher and parental autonomy support within this framework to explain relations with passion and academic as well as nonacademic outcomes related to science education.

                                              Methods: Two cross-sectional studies were conducted at different time points (Study 1, N=761 and Study 2, N=257). College students completed questionnaires about passion, persistence, autonomy, motivation, and psychological wellbeing during class time. We used SEM to demonstrate predictive paths among autonomy support, both types of passion, and related outcomes.

                                              Results: In both studies, parental and teacher autonomy support were positively associated with harmonious passion, whereas obsessive passion was predicted by teacher autonomy support only. Both types of passion related positively to outcomes within science education (Study 1), but only harmonious passion also led to psychological wellbeing (Study 2).

                                              Conclusions: Our results supported the theoretical framework of DMP and extended this line of research by showing how HP also leads to psychological wellbeing, thereby allowing students to experience a fuller range of adaptive outcomes. The contribution of parental autonomy support played a significant role in fostering harmonious passion and wellbeing.

                                              Action/Impact: Teacher and parental autonomy support is fundamental for college students to adopt a more harmonious passion toward science education. This impacts the way students achieve and maintain a balance between performing well in school while also experiencing outcomes related to wellbeing such as happiness and life satisfaction.


                                              Presenter: David Litalien, Université Laval, Canada
                                              Nicolas Gillet, Université Francois Rabelais, France
                                              Marylène Gagné, University of Western Australia, Australia
                                              Catherine F. Ratelle, Université Laval, Canada
                                              Alexandre J. S. Morin, Concordia University, Canada

                                              Title: Self-determined academic motivation profiles among university students: Similarities across gender and age groups

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                                              Background/rationale: According to self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2017), students can simultaneously adopt various types of motivation. Although a person-centered approach is well-suited to explore their combination within individual, few studies using such approach and previous work have been criticized for relying on cluster analyses or on broad categories of motivation.

                                              Methods: We conducted Latent Profile and Multigroup Profile Similarity Analyses to investigate whether undergraduate male and female students (N = 1072) from three age groups share similar motivation configurations (7 types; Vallerand et al., 1992), and whether the predictors and outcomes of these configurations are similar across gender and age groups.

                                              Results: Results fully supported the similarity of the motivation profiles and their relations with the predictors and the outcome. Five distinct profiles were identified: Knowledge-Motivated, Control-Motivated, Fully Motivated, Unmotivated and Highly Amotivated-Sensation Seeking profiles. Students’ level of vitality varied across profiles, whereas both parents’ warmth and paternal involvement predicted profile membership.

                                              Conclusions: Our results extended motivation research and supported a multiple motives approach and its generalizability across gender and age groups. Profiles presenting high levels on at least one facet of intrinsic motivation were associated with higher levels of vitality. The contribution of parents remains significant for undergraduate students.

                                              Action/Impact: Teachers and parents should be particularly attentive to students displaying a profile mainly characterized by controlled motivation (Controlled) or by globally low levels of motivation (Unmotivated).


                                              IAAP Division 6: Clinical and Community Psychology


                                              Maria Paz Garcia-Vera

                                              Maria Paz Garcia-Vera

                                              Keynote Address: Psychological Treatments for Victims of Terrorism

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 6: Clinical and Community Psychology

                                              Abstract:

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation:


                                              SpeakerName

                                              Tim Hannan

                                              Keynote Address: Complex Trauma in Childhood and Adolescence

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 6: Clinical and Community Psychology

                                              Abstract:

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: School of Psychology Charles Sturt University


                                              IAAP Division 7: Applied Gerontology


                                              IAAP Division 8: Health Psychology


                                              Barbara Mullan

                                              Barbara Mullan

                                              Title of Symposium: The Role of Habit Strength and Automaticity in Adherence Behaviours

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 8, Health Psychology

                                              Symposium summary and aims:
                                              Health psychological research has until recently focussed on rational processes of decision making and ignored the more emotional and automatic processes that impact our health decision making. This is particularly important in adherence behaviours where behaviours such as taking medication and engaging in physical activity are vital for personal as well as societal benefits. However most people are non adherent at least some of the time. Using a variety of theoretical approaches and spanning many chronic illness including diabetes and stroke, a variety of adherence behaviours will be explored. We also present some exciting new interventions and suggest ways of integrating the research presented into a comprehensive framework to inform new research.

                                              We draw on research from five research groups, across three continents, and four countries to provide the most current, topical research in adherence. Using a variety of methodological approaches including cross-sectional and longitudinal predictive studies, single group and N-of-1 designs and a randomised controlled trial we provide a coherent narrative on new ways forward in both conceptualising and intervening in adherence research to better inform both research and clinical practice.

                                              Using a novel theoretical approach Dr Mullan investigated what the most important predictors of medication adherence are. Based on dual process approaches she examined whether rational or emotional factors were most important in medication adherence regimes across a range of different complexities. The results suggest that automatic processes like habit are more important than controlled processes like motivation in predicting behaviour.

                                              In a complementary study in a population with diabetes, Dr Burns presents results that explore the importance of considering the complex interactions between mental health, adherence behaviours and habit strength. This research has important implications for people with diabetes and their health professional multi-disciplinary teams. The results suggest that interventions should target strengthening habit to improve adherence which is the focus of the next two presentations.

                                              Dr Phillips presents the results of such a habit based RCT exploring the differences in complexity of behaviour in forming and maintaining habit and behaviour. Her results demonstrated that there are individual differences in when and how habit based interventions work and interventions need to consider the temporality complexity of the behaviour and individual differences in when interventions might be successful.

                                              Dr Fritz also presents on a habit based intervention developed to target physical activity and dietary adherence behaviours in low income African Americans. The results were positive with improvements in automaticity over time and greater gains in simple (eating) rather than complex (physical activity) behaviours over the intervention. This takes us closer to understanding how to facilitate habit development for adherence behaviours in high risk populations.

                                              Building on the importance of inter personal differences, using both novel technology and novel methods, Mr Bierbauer takes an n of 1 approach to adherence to home recommendation in patients after stroke, to improve outcomes. People living after stroke need to engage in certain home based activities and using individual and dyadic therapies he demonstrated treatment effectiveness across groups.

                                              Presenter: Barbara Mullan

                                              Title: Can an extended model of health behaviour improve prediction of medication adherence?

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                                              Authors: Caitlin Liddelow, Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University
                                              Barbara Mullan, 1Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University

                                              Background/Rationale: Only 50% of patients correctly adhere to their medication regime. Non-malleable factors contributing to non adherence have been previously identified and incorporated in interventions to improve medication adherence. However, non adherence rates are still high, indicating a need for research into other psychosocial variables that may influence medication adherence.

                                              Methods: Using the Integrated Behavioural Model 163 participants who regularly take prescription medication completed a questionnaire measuring attitudes, perceived norms, personal agency, knowledge and skills, salience, intention, environmental constraints and habit in relation to their medication adherence. One week later, they completed a short follow-up measuring behaviour.

                                              Results: Attitudes, subjective norms and personal agency accounted for 9.6% of variance in intentions, but personal agency was the only significant predictor. In predicting adherence, the factors accounted for 11.3% of the variance. Contrary to what was hypothesised, intention was not significant. Habit was the only significant predictor of behaviour.

                                              Conclusions: The findings show that the role of social norms is important when considering intentions to take medication correctly. Further the role of automatic processes appear to be more important that rational processes when predicting medication adherence.

                                              Action/Impact: Focussing on techniques that make behaviours more automatic, such as cues to action, is important in future interventions.


                                              Presenter: Rachel J. Burns

                                              Title: Does habit strength for taking medication moderate the association between symptoms of poor mental health and medication adherence among people with diabetes?

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                                              Authors: Rachel J. Burns, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

                                              Sonya S. Deschênes, McGill University & Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada

                                              Bärbel Knäuper, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

                                              Norbert Schmitz, McGill University & Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada

                                              Background/rationale: Elevated levels of symptoms of poor mental health are associated with poorer medication adherence. However, habit strength for taking medication is positively associated with adherence. This study sought to determine if the associations between symptoms of poor mental health and medication adherence were moderated by habit strength.

                                              Methods: Cross-sectional data from 790 participants with type 2 diabetes who were participating in an on-going cohort study was used. All participants reported using oral diabetes medication. Mental health was assessed with symptom inventories for depressive symptoms and diabetes distress. Medication adherence and habit strength were assessed via self-report.

                                              Results: Linear regression analysis that adjusted for covariates revealed a significant habit strength x depressive symptoms interaction, p=.02. If habit was weak or of average strength, depressive symptoms were inversely related to adherence. If habit was strong, there was no association. A similar interaction was observed for diabetes distress, p=.004.

                                              Conclusions: This study suggests that habit strength may operate as a buffer in the associations between symptoms of poor mental health and oral medication adherence in people with type 2 diabetes.

                                              Action/Impact: Elevated symptoms of poor mental health are relatively common in people with type 2 diabetes and good medication adherence is essential for diabetes management. Therefore, it is recommended that interventions promoting the development and maintenance of strong habits for taking medication are developed and evaluated.


                                              Presenter:L. Alison Phillips

                                              Title: Strategies for Helping Patients Form Treatment-Related Habits May Depend on the Behavior (e.g., Medication vs. Exercise) and the Individual (e.g., Diurnal Preference).

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                                              Author: L. Alison Phillips, Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA

                                              Background/Rationale: Patients’ treatment-related habit strength predicts adherence, particularly in the long-term. Interventions should help patients develop treatment-related habits. Little is known about behavior-specific and individual-difference factors that may influence optimal habit-development. We hypothesize that timing of new habits should match individuals’ diurnal preference (morningness-eveningness) for complex but not simple behaviors.

                                              Methods: We conducted a habit-development intervention (using implementation intentions) for two different health behaviors. 400 young women were randomized to 8 groups: behavior (calcium supplement; physical activity) X cue-timing group (no-cue control; cue-control; AM-cue; PM-cue). Diurnal preference is a continuous covariate. Multilevel modeling was used to test hypotheses.

                                              Results: Hypotheses were partially supported. “Morning types” were better at developing calcium-supplement habits (and adhering to recommended doses) than were “evening -types” regardless of cue-timing. “Evening types” were better at developing physical activity habit when they were told to pick an evening cue for exercise, compared to a morning cue.

                                              Conclusions: The influence of cue-timing for new health habit development may depend on the type of health behavior. Complex behaviors, such as exercise, might be best formed into habits if matched to patients’ diurnal preference. Medication/Supplement adherence might require extra intervention for “evening types”.

                                              Action/Impact: While replication of these findings is needed, this research demonstrates the importance of investigating individual-differences and behavior-specific differences in health-habit development and provides useful information for intervention developers.


                                              Presenter: Heather Fritz

                                              Title: A Brief Intervention Targeting Dietary and Physical Activity Habit Development in At-Risk Populations: A Proof-of-Concept Study

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                                              Authors: Heather Fritz, Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Wayne State University, United States
                                              Wassim Tarraf, Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Wayne State University, United States

                                              Background/Rationale: Adherence to recommended physically activity and dietary behaviors remain the most effective means of reducing cardiometabolic disease risk. Because habit strength predicts behavioral adherence, interventions should target habit development. Few such interventions exist and little is known about the feasibility and efficacy of such approaches.

                                              Methods: Using a single-group design, we delivered an 8-week habit-based intervention targeting eight participant-selected physical activity and dietary habits among 24 low-income African American adults with metabolic syndrome. Anthropometry and self-reported behavioral automaticity (habit) measures were administered at baseline and week 20. Inferential statistics were used to test hypotheses.

                                              Results: The intervention was feasible and resulted in gains in behavioral automaticity for 98.9% of habits. Adherence was positively associated with gains in behavioral automaticity for both behaviors, though adherence and gains in behavioral automaticity were higher for dietary than physical activity habits. Participants reported difficulties pursuing multiple habits simultaneously.

                                              Conclusions: The habit-based intervention pilot resulted in positive gains in behavioral automaticity across a range of dietary and physical activity behaviors. Habit-based interventions might be best affected by breaking complex behaviors down into component parts. Developing multiple habits simultaneously may increase the time it takes to develop a habit.

                                              Action/Impact: While more research is needed to determine how best to facilitate habit development among high-risk populations in real-world circumstances, this research is a first step in developing understanding of how this could be achieved.


                                              Presenter: Walter Bierbauer

                                              Title: Robot-assisted therapy in chronic stroke patients: Adherence to at-home treatment recommendation

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                                              Authors: Walter Bierbauer, URPP Dynamics of Healthy Aging & Applied Social and Health Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland
                                              Kilian Baur, Sensory-Motor Systems Lab, ETH Zurich and Spinal Cord Injury Center, University Hospital Balgrist, Switzerland
                                              Jaime E. Duarte, Sensory-Motor Systems Lab, ETH Zurich and Spinal Cord Injury Center, University Hospital Balgrist, Switzerland
                                              Urte Scholz, Applied Social and Health Psychology & URPP Dynamics of Healthy Aging, University of Zurich, Switzerland

                                              Background: Stroke patients often face reduced mobility and loss of upper extremity function. Robot-assisted therapy can help patients significantly improve functioning in their paretic arm. It remains unclear whether these improvements also translate into everyday life. This study investigates how stroke patients adhere to at-home treatment recommendations.

                                              Methods: In cumulative N-of-1 trials adopting an A-B-A-B design patients got both solo robot-assisted therapy (A) and dyadic robot-assisted therapy (B) together with their spouse. At-home arm activity was measured by wrist-worn accelerometry and related motivational, volitional and social variables were collected daily using self-report across five weeks.

                                              Results: In weeks with robot-assisted therapy, patients increased their participation in activities of daily living. Additionally, dyadic therapy was associated with increased paretic arm involvement in everyday life, thereby adhering to treatment recommendations.

                                              Conclusion: Fostering daily at-home exercises of a paretic arm is an important goal in stroke rehabilitation. By examining the effects of different robot-assisted therapies on exercising behaviour, this study contributes to the optimization of the stroke rehabilitation process.

                                              Impact: N-of-1 trials can be used to evaluate treatment effectiveness in a single individual, thereby helping to close the gap between evidence and practice. The aggregation of these trial findings will inform treatment decisions for other patients unaffiliated with the trial.


                                              IAAP Division 9: Economic Psychology


                                              David Leiser

                                              David Leiser

                                              Presidential Address: Policy Impact of Public Misunderstanding of Economics

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                                              Sponsoring Division:

                                              Abstract:

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                                              Affiliation: Ben Gurion University


                                              IAAP Division 10: Psychology and Law


                                              IAAP Division 11: Political Psychology


                                              IAAP Division 12: Sport Psychology


                                              Lawrence R. Brawley

                                              Lawrence R. Brawley

                                              Keynote Address: Encouraging Self-Management of Exercise Using a Group-mediated Cognitive Behavioural Intervention: Social-Cognitive, Functional and Adherence Effects .

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 12, Sport Psychology

                                              Abstract: There are multiple, well known physical and mental health benefits accrued by older adults who are regularly active ([WHO], 2010). On the other hand, it is also well recognized that the older adult segment of the population is perhaps the least active of all age groups. Both asymptomatic and symptomatic older adults benefit from exercise training and exercise therapy provided through interventions and physical activity through community programs. Many of these programs are economically delivered by group format in community leisure services and through regional disease prevention/health promotion programs. Ironically, the benefits attained are typically short lived when older adults attempt to self-manage activity after they leave such programs. From a translational perspective, could such groups be utilized as (a) one means of offering older adults social support,(b) a motivational influence for intervening and (c) a platform in which to learn self-regulation skills to increase and maintain changes in their exercise?

                                              To answer these questions, this presentation is divided into four discrete sections. First, we discuss background why groups can be powerful behavior change agents as well as the basic structure of our group-motivated intervention model. Second, we present a generic description of the intervention structure and how we conduct this group-mediated cognitive behavioural intervention (GMCB). Third, we present a meta-analytic summary of results of several older adult GMCB physical activity interventions across outcomes concerning physical activity adherence; functional and physiological factors; and social cognitive factors. Fourth, we close the presentation by commenting on the translational perspective for this type of intervention relative to feasibility, interventionist training, and potential sustainability toward the goal of promoting older adult health and preventing disease.

                                              Bio: Dr. Brawley is a Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the College of Kinesiology and affiliate member of the School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan. He is in the second of his 7 year, Canada Research Chair (CRC) awards. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and several sport and exercise psychology scientific organizations. As a CRC, Dr. Brawley’s research examines why some older adults successfully adopt physical activity for (a) healthy lifestyle change, (b) chronic disease self-management, while others struggle. Understanding the psychology of this change is essential to help people sustain the activity needed to promote health and prevent diseases. To this end, he and his colleagues have developed novel group-motivated, cognitive-behavior change interventions that successfully encourage individuals to maintain changes in their physical activity. These interventions have been conducted, for example, among sedentary older adults; cardiac rehabilitation initiates; overweight individuals and those with knee osteoarthritis; spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis. Dr. Brawley’s publications span the fields of psychology, kinesiology, behavioral medicine, public health, gerontology and rehabilitation. With colleagues, he has recently contributed a chapter entitled Self Management of Health Behavior in Geriatric Medicine in Hazzard’s 2016 text on Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. He is currently funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation.

                                              Affiliation: Canada Research Chair, Tier 1 in Physical Activity for Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, College of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan


                                              Larry Brawley

                                              Lawrence R. Brawley

                                              Title of Symposium: Perspectives on Physical Activity Promotion in Diverse Groups and in Different Settings

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 12, Sport Psychology

                                              Abstract:

                                              Bio: Dr. Brawley is a Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the College of Kinesiology and affiliate member of the School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan. He is in the second of his 7 year, Canada Research Chair (CRC) awards. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and several sport and exercise psychology scientific organizations. As a CRC, Dr. Brawley’s research examines why some older adults successfully adopt physical activity for (a) healthy lifestyle change, (b) chronic disease self-management, while others struggle. Understanding the psychology of this change is essential to help people sustain the activity needed to promote health and prevent diseases. To this end, he and his colleagues have developed novel group-motivated, cognitive-behavior change interventions that successfully encourage individuals to maintain changes in their physical activity. These interventions have been conducted, for example, among sedentary older adults; cardiac rehabilitation initiates; overweight individuals and those with knee osteoarthritis; spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis. Dr. Brawley’s publications span the fields of psychology, kinesiology, behavioral medicine, public health, gerontology and rehabilitation. With colleagues, he has recently contributed a chapter entitled Self Management of Health Behavior in Geriatric Medicine in Hazzard’s 2016 text on Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. He is currently funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation.

                                              Affiliation: Canada Research Chair, Tier 1 in Physical Activity for Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, College of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan

                                              Presenter: Amy Latimer-Cheung, Queen’s University, Canada

                                              Title: Increasing physical activity participation among adults with a mobility impairment

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                                              Abstract: Mobility impairments are those that affect a person’s ability to move including amputation, cerebral palsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury. Research to date suggests that there are physical and psychological benefits associated with the adoption and maintenance of an active lifestyle for adults living with a mobility impairment. Pulling from theories of physical activity promotion, this presentation will summarise: 1) recent investigations developing and testing persuasive messages and theory-based interventions encouraging participation, 2) the optimisation of delivery of community-based programming, and 3) the leveraging of physical activity status to mitigate stereotypes of disability. Reasons for successes and lessons learned in translating research findings to the key stakeholders in the disability community will also be discussed.


                                              Presenter: Kevin S. Spink, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

                                              Title: All for one, one for all: Social norms as levers of influence in getting people active

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                                              Abstract: Staying healthy is goal that few would dispute. While there are many ways to say healthy, one that has been gaining traction through a burgeoning compilation of research is being physically active. Achieving a certain level of physical activity has been associated with a host of health benefits that range from reducing one’s risk of cardiovascular disease to improving one’s mental functioning. Despite these evidence-based claims for the improvement in health through physical activity, most adults do not achieve the required levels of activity to accrue the benefits. Although there are many factors that we could consider as we ponder how to get people more active, one that comes to mind is the social environment. After all, we are social beings, and as such, we rely on others for information about how to navigate the environment we find ourselves in any given time. We also know that we often decide what to do by observing/perceiving what other people do and think. A perusal of the extant literature reveals that there is a large body of evidence documenting the relationships between what others do (social norms) and human behaviour in many settings. However, examination of social norms in the physical activity setting is just emerging. Using an established conceptual framework, this presentation will provide recent findings emanating from our lab that illustrate how perceptions of others’ activity behaviour are related to, as well as influence, individual physical activity in the school, work, and sport setting. Applied implications emanating from this research will be provided.


                                              Presenter: Larry Brawley, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

                                              Title: The dilemma of relying too much on exercise providers

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                                              Abstract: This presentation will raise the possibility that helpful exercise providers and health care professionals may inadvertently be contributing to the decline in exercise adherence after exercise programs finish. For individuals relying heavily on providers for support, guidance and instruction, a dilemma arises. Dependence on the exercise provider means participants are less likely to have had opportunity to develop the skills or have mastery experiences required for their sole management of exercise and for continuing adherence. Consequently, adherence to independent exercise post program tends to decline. To illustrate, research examples from asymptomatic exercisers as well as those with cardiovascular disease are presented. Those individuals relying more on the provider tend to see themselves (a) being less persistent with future exercise, (b) choose fewer possibilities to execute self-managed exercise (c) engage in self-managed exercise less than those who relied less on providers. To conclude, evidence-based interventions are highlighted where providers collaborate with participants before structured exercise ends to provide mastery experience with self-management.


                                              Presenter: Glyn C. Roberts, Marit Sorensen, Nicolas Lemyre, on behalf of the EuroFIT Consortium. Norwegian University of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway.

                                              Title: Motivation strategies for sustained behaviour change in active lifestyle interventions: The EuroFIT project

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                                              Abstract: We can never have equality of achievement, but we can have equality of motivation: That quote by Nicholls (1979) enshrines the conceptual basis of enhancing motivation for lifestyle change in the EuroFIT project. EuroFIT uses contemporary motivation theory in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to adopt and sustain health related behaviors such as increased physical activity, reduced sedentary behavior, and healthy diets in middle-aged men. Men participated in a 12-week behavior change program delivered at their local professional football club. We utilized technology advances to provide real-time, self-relevant feedback on sedentary time and physical activity (SitFit), as well as connection to other participants (MatchFit), to sustain engagement and self-regulation. Club coaches in 15 top professional soccer clubs in four EuroFIT countries (Norway, Portugal, Netherlands, and England) delivered the EuroFIT intervention. We describe the components of EuroFIT that are informed by contemporary motivation theory. We will present the findings of the intervention model as partially mediated by constructs such as need satisfaction, autonomous motivation, and self-referenced mastery competence resulting in sustained healthy lifestyles and improved health and well-being.


                                              Discussant: Joan L. Duda, University of Birmingham, UK


                                              Joan L. Duda

                                              Joan L. Duda

                                              Title of Symposium: Contemporary Topics in Sport Psychology: Connecting Science to Solutions

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 12, Sport Psychology

                                              Abstract:

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Birmingham, UK

                                              Presenter: Montse C. Ruiz

                                              Title: Assessment of psychobiosocial states related to sports performance and implications for applied practice

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                                              Authors: Montse C. Ruiz1, Claudio Robazza2, Asko Tolvanen3 & Juri Hanin4
                                              1 University of Jyväskylä, Finland; 2 University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy; 3 University of Jyväskylä, Finland; 4 KIHU-Research Institute for Olympic Sports, Finland

                                              Abstract: Most previous emotion research has focused on the study of the impact of selected discrete emotions on sports performance. Athletes, however, experience a wide range of emotions and other feeling states, which can aid or disrupt performance. The individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Hanin, 2007) has guided the study of athletes’ performance-related states. Grounded in the IZOF model, a psychobiosocial state is defined as a situational and multimodal manifestation of total human functioning with emotion at its core. Substantial empirical evidence has provided support for the utility of a comprehensive assessment of athletes’ emotional experiences (Ruiz, Raglin, & Hanin, 2017). This presentation will outline an idiographic approach, which can be used for an accurate assessment for intra-individual and inter-individual analysis of athletes’ functional and dysfunctional states. Implications for applied practice will be discussed; in particular regarding the development of effective interventions aimed at helping athletes regulate their emotional states to better cope with competitive pressures and achieve a consistently high level of performance in training and competition.


                                              Presenter: Claudio Robazza

                                              Title: Emotions and self-regulation in sport

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                                              Authors: Claudio Robazza1, Montse C. Ruiz2,
                                              1 University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy; 2 University of Jyväskylä, Finland

                                              Abstract: Emotions are recognized to exert short- and long-term, functional or dysfunctional effects on performance due to their impact on individual effort, attention, decision making, memory, behavior, and interpersonal interactions. These effects depend on emotion content, intensity, frequency, time of occurrence, and cognitive appraisal, as well as self-regulation skills. Athletes strive to self-regulate in practice and competition to reach and maintain an optimal pattern of emotions also in face of unfavorable circumstances. Among the several theoretical perspectives on emotional self-regulation, the multi-action plan (MAP) is a sport-specific approach rooted in Hanin’s individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) model and the identification-control-correction (ICC) program. The MAP advocates the combined use of both emotion-centered and action-centered strategies toward the optimization of emotional states and athletic performance. Central to the MAP is a 2 × 2 × 2 interplay among performance level (high-low), attention control level (high-low), and hedonic valence level (pleasure-displeasure), which gives rise to multiple dimensional states. Within this framework, performers are guided to identify, regulate, and optimize their functional and dysfunctional emotions and their most relevant components of functional performance patterns. Proficient athletes should be able to consistently adjust their degree of hedonic valence and conscious attention control according to their current state and situational demands. Drawing on the MAP and related research, applied strategies for effective self-regulation in athletes will be discussed.


                                              Presenter: Natalia B. Stambulova

                                              Title: Athletes' dual careers: European research, actions, and policy making

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                                              Author: Natalia B. Stambulova, Halmstad University, Sweden

                                              Abstract: This presentation aims to overview contemporary perspectives on athletes’ dual (sport and education) career emphasizing links between research, actions, and policy making particularly as characterizing work done in Europe. The Dual Career (DC) approach in European Union (EU) countries is characterized by separate settings responsible for the provision of sport (sport clubs) and education (schools, universities), and therefore special arrangements are needed between these settings to facilitate athletes’ DCs. During the last decade, several steps have been undertaken to support athletes’ DCs. First, the European Commission financed pilot DC projects, and their findings contributed to the policy document “The EU Guidelines on Dual Careers of Athletes” (2012). These Guidelines suggested a minimal standard for DC programs within the EU and encouraged development of national DC guidelines. Second, the EU Guidelines fueled DC research in Europe that resulted, for example, in the Special Issue of Psychology of Sport and Exercise “Dual career development and transition” (Stambulova & Wylleman, 2015). Third, several new DC projects were financed by the European Commission in 2012-17. One of them “Gold in Education and Elite Sport” (Wylleman, De Brandt, & Defruyt, 2017) took a holistic developmental perspective (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013) to investigate competencies of 15-25 year old DC athletes and the competencies of DC support providers (DCSP) who aim to help athletes deal with DC challenges. Forth, based on this latter project, actions have been taken in each of nine participated countries; e.g., in Sweden, the project findings contributed to the development of a national model of DCSP education and Swedish DC Guidelines (Swedish Sports Confederation, 2017).


                                              Presenter: Nicolas Lemyre

                                              Title: Motivations processes and their implications for burnout propensity in sport

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                                              Author: Nicolas Lemyre, Norwegian University of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway

                                              Abstract: Not all athletes thrive and experience meaningful, enjoyable and satisfying engagement. Indeed, some athletes report feelings and cognitions associated with burnout; i.e., emotional and physical exhaustion, a devaluation of their sport participation, and a reduced sense of accomplishment (Raedeke & Smith, 2001). Grounded in Self Determination Theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000, 2017) as well as achievement goal frameworks, research has examined the implications of the coaches’ interpersonal style (or variations in the motivational climate, motivation regulations, basic need satisfaction in regard to the likelihood of athletes’ reporting burnout symptoms. In general, existent studies suggest particular coach-created environments (e.g., those marked by controlling and ego-involving behaviours), motivational perspectives (e.g., more controlled motivation regulations), and athletes’ reporting of low satisfaction or even thwarting of their needs to feel competent, personal autonomy and relatedness make it more likely that heightened burnout will occur. Intervention strategies will be presented that should help reduce the incidence of athletes’ burning out and facilitate a more optimal and health conducive sport engagement.

                                              Discussant: Robert J. Vallerand, Universite due Quebec a Montreal


                                              IAAP Division 13: Traffic and Transportation Psychology


                                              David Crundall

                                              David Crundall

                                              Keynote Address: A framework for understanding hazard perception as a driver skill

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 13: Traffic and Transportation Psychology

                                              Abstract:

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom


                                              Bryan Porter

                                              Bryan Porter

                                              Keynote Address: Ignoring half the story: Why do we maintain a person-focused bias in driver-behavior research while often overlooking cultural impacts?

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 13: Traffic and Transportation Psychology

                                              Abstract: Traffic psychologists, as a diverse group of scholars, to our credit have given at least some attention in recent years to cultural variables. We contributed to one of the earliest comprehensive volumes on the topic, published by AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety (2007). We published one of the first book chapters on the topic in Handbook of Traffic Psychology (Özkan & Lajunen, 2011). We published a special issue in Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour (September 2014; Ward & Özkan, editors). However, the phrases “traffic safety culture,” “traffic culture,” “driving culture,” or “safety culture,” in conjunction with “psychology,” were written in titles, abstracts, or keywords for only 157 documents published between 1998 to the present (the terms were not present before 1998 per Scopus). This frequency represents only 0.034% of all publications mentioning “psychology” within those search fields in the same time period. The good news is the frequency year-on-year has increased in recent years, indicating the growing - but still very small - interest in culture as a factor in our discipline. This presentation explores the slow growth of culture as a factor in our models, and argues that the rate is unacceptable for the larger relevance of our findings for driver, passenger, pedestrian, and ecosystem safety. We seem to have forgotten lessons learned in social psychology about the limits of individual-only approaches to behavior, which unfortunately still dominate psychological theories, models, and research designs. Traffic psychology as a discipline has been no different from psychology at-large in limiting its impact by self-inflicted oversight when ignoring cultural variables, and it is time to reconsider some of our priorities.

                                              Bio: Dr. Porter is Professor of Psychology and the Associate Dean of the Graduate School at Old Dominion University. His has investigated red light running, safety-belt use, tailgating, and pedestrian safety. Fatigued and distracted driving are more recent interests. Traffic safety culture has become an over-arching concern for his work and for his views about traffic psychology at-large.
                                              His has published in many outlets, from peer-reviewed scientific literature to technical reports. As lead or co-investigator, he has been awarded more than $4 million in grant funds for mostly traffic-safety projects. The media regularly call upon him to discuss traffic safety – to date this includes more than 100 different pieces in which he was directly quoted.
                                              Dr. Porter was editor of the Handbook of Traffic Psychology published in 2011. He was also Co-Editor-in-Chief of the peer-reviewed journal, Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour from 2012 to 2017. Currently, he is working on a book of human factors and autonomous driving with an expected publication date of 2019.

                                              Affiliation: Old Dominion University, U.S.A.


                                              Ann Williamson

                                              Ann Williamson

                                              Keynote Address: Development of automated vehicles needs Applied Psychology

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 13: Traffic and Transportation Psychology

                                              Abstract: Autonomous vehicles are claimed to be on the immediate horizon and driver assist technologies are already in many vehicles. The impetus for this is the claim that removing the driver will have unprecedented benefits for road safety in the order of reducing crashes by 90-95 percent. Unfortunately, these forecasts are almost certainly misleading as they are based on the false premises that driver error is the cause of most crashes and that technology is infallible. Many of the problems following the introduction of new technologies are due to a focus on the perceived benefits of the technology itself and a failure to acknowledge the role of the human. This single-minded focus produces technology in vehicles that cannot be called assistive. Warnings that nag the driver about things they already know, technology that takes over the driving task, but makes it even more monotonous and then requires the driver to respond too quickly to be affective, do not benefit the driver or decrease crash risk. The issue needs a more human-centred approach; after all, vehicles are tools for humans to use. Psychology has an enormous contribution to make here but it has been mostly absent. This presentation will discuss the issues with the introduction of autonomous vehicles and assistive technologies, mostly relating to poor human-machine interfaces and failure to apply what we know about human cognitive processing and human capacities. The presentation will explain the need to act now to improve human-technology relationships and maximize safety benefits from automated vehicles.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Transport and Road Safety (TARS) Research Centre
                                              School of Aviation
                                              University of New South Wales, Australia


                                              IAAP Division 14: Applied Cognitive Psychology


                                              IAAP Division 15: Psychology Students


                                              IAAP Division 16: Counseling Psychology


                                              Paul J. Hartung

                                              Paul J. Hartung

                                              Keynote Address: Ten years of life designing: advances and future directions

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16:Counseling

                                              Abstract: The year 2019 will mark ten years since the original statement of life designing as a new, internationally-constructed paradigm for careers science and practice (Savickas, et al., 2009). This paper will examine life designing in retrospect and prospect as a paradigm for career studies and career intervention around the globe. Life designing-based theories, research, and practices will be reviewed to identify advances, gaps, and possible future directions for careers science and practice. Life designing offers positive direction for the careers field to advance human health and well-being and move the field from the margins to the mainstream of psychology and counseling. Continuing to adopt and advance life designing counseling principles and practices helps transform career counseling from a straightforward, logical pursuit to a complex, therapeutic endeavor to assist people to inscribe their lives with purpose and direction. With continuing efforts led by approaches such as career construction theory and practice, long-held distinctions between career and personal counseling will give way to evolving a perspective on work as central to counseling for mental health and well-being. Doing so may yield the most desirable effect of attracting more students and professionals to the careers field. Original goals of the life design paradigm will continue to propel it as a model for meaningfully construing and constructing work and career in human life.

                                              Bio: Paul J. Hartung, Ph.D. is Professor of Family and Community Medicine at Northeast Ohio Medical University. He has authored over 80 journal articles and book chapters and co-edited three books dealing with career development theory and practice. Currently, he is editor for The Career Development Quarterly and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Vocational Behavior and Journal of Career Assessment. Prof. Hartung is a fellow of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP; Division 16), the American Psychological Association (Division 17), and the National Career Development Association. He is a past recipient of the APA Division 17 John L. Holland award for achievement in career and personality research. Since 2014, Prof. Hartung has served as President-Elect, Division 16 (Counseling Psychology) of the IAAP.

                                              Affiliation: Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, Ohio, USA


                                              Gudbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir

                                              Gudbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir

                                              Keynote Address: Narrative semiotics and the career construction interview

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: Narrative counseling is increasingly used in career counselling. One can speak of a ‘narrative turn’. Many techniques have been developed in recent years, of which Mark Savickas’s Career Construction Interview (CCI) is one of the most theoretically elaborate. Though narrative counseling and narrative psychology have used theories and techniques from literary studies, there is still much to learn from them. Based on my experience as a counselor and on my recent research I will discuss how the use of a certain number of concepts and techniques associated with the narrative semiotics of A.J. Greimas can refine and enrich narrative counseling, with special regard to Savickas's Career Construction Interview (CCI). In particular I will demonstrate that training in the systematic search for so-called isotopies and the use of the analytic tools of the actantial model and the semiotic square can improve counselors’ ability to help their clients construct a meaningful story out of their lives and set out a pathway to attain future goals.

                                              Bio: Gudbjörg or Gugga Vilhjálmsdóttir, Ph. D. is a full Professor in career guidance and counselling and Head of Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Iceland. Her research projects are within career development theory and currently with an emphasis on Savickas‘ career constructivism. The development of a career adaptability measure and literary analysis of narratives in career construction counseling have figured among recent research projects, as well as the history of school and career counselling in Iceland. Furthermore, she has conducted two quantitative research projects where Bourdieu‘s habitus theory is used to throw light on the links between social variables and career choice. An ongoing research interest has been the evaluation of career education and counselling, both in Iceland and in the Nordic countries. Dr. Vilhjálmsdóttir received the NCDA international award in 2006 (National Career Development Association) for her work in developing the counselling profession in Iceland. She is an honorary member of the Icelandic Association of School and Career Counsellors. Dr. Vilhjálmsdóttir is a board member of the European Society of Vocational Design and Career Counselling. She was recently elected as the representative of the Nordic countries on the board of the International Association of Educational and Vocational Guidance.

                                              Affiliation: Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, School of Social Sciences, Gimli. University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland


                                              Maria Eduarda Duarte & Paul J. Hartung

                                              Maria Eduarda Duarte & Paul J. Hartung

                                              Title of Symposium: Counseling Psychology: Reflecting on the Past, Envisioning the Future

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: The symposiasts will highlight the importance of counseling psychology around the globe by considering two main aspects: a reflection on the past and an envisioning of the future. The presentations and discussion will include career counseling in (South) Africa and how to use retrospection to build prospects for the future and transform perceived challenges into opportunities, presented by Kobus Maree. Career counseling, diversity, connectedness, narrative, and story within a systems theory framework will be presented by Mary McMahon (Australia). Zhi-Jin Hou (China) will discuss the challenges and opportunities of counseling psychology in China. Fred Leong (USA) will talk about the diversified Portfolio Model of adaptability, positing that diversified investment in multiple life experiences, life roles, and relationships promotes positive adaptation to life’s challenges. Marucia Bardagi (Brazil) will discuss diversity in South America’s counseling theories and interventions.

                                              Bio: M. Eduarda Duarte is Full Professor at the University of Lisbon, Faculty of Psychology, where she directs the Master Course in Psychology of Human Resources, Work, and Organizations. Her professional interests include career psychology theory and research, with special emphasis on issues relevant to adults and the world of work. She is research director of Career Guidance and Development of Human Resources Services. Her publications and presentations have encompassed topics on adult’s career problems, testing and assessment, and counselling process. She is since 2005 Chair of the Portuguese Psychological Society; she also served on editorial boards for some Portuguese, European, and Iberia-American journals. She was the Director of the National Institute of Guidance (2009-2014). She is President of Counselling Division, IAAP. She is Fellow Award – IAAP (2014), and ESVDC award 2015. She is also National Defence Adviser, since 2006.

                                              Affiliation: Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

                                              Presenter: Jacobus Gideon (Kobus) Maree (South Africa)

                                              Title: Theoretical reflections and practical suggestions on reshaping and adapting career theory and practice

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                                              Abstract: The world of work is changing rapidly. Under- and unemployment rates across the world are rising steadily, and inequality is spiralling. A high premium is placed on dealing effectively with work-related transitions. Career theorists and practitioners have to rethink their theory and practice continually and devise appropriate strategies for the workplace. A qualitative→/+quantitative paradigm is used. Theoretical reflections on career counselling’s response to what is happening in society and, more particularly, the workplace are provided first. Examples from two research projects are then given of contextualizing, decontextualizing, recontextualizing, and co-contextualizing in qualitative and quantitative research (in disadvantaged contexts in particular). The findings demonstrate the importance of relating contextual challenges to career counselling issues and concepts and of embracing newer ideas such as career and self-construction and life design (in addition to more traditional approaches). Dealing with policy matters is essential before the focus can be shifted to policy implementation. Career counselling theory and practice in developing countries in particular differ from context to context. Traditional career counselling still predominates even though what works well in one part of the world may not work elsewhere because of socioeconomic and cultural disparities. Relating contextual challenges to career counselling concepts is essential. Ongoing contextualization, decontextualization, recontextualization, and co-contextualization of career counselling theory and practice is the way forward theoretically and practically to help clients flourish instead of merely ‘survive’ in the 4th industrial revolution (Work 4.0). It will also enhance the short-, medium-, and longer-term effect of career counselling globally.

                                              Background/Rationale: The world of work is changing rapidly. Under- and unemployment rates across the world are rising steadily, and inequality is spiralling. A high premium is placed on dealing effectively with work-related transitions. Career theorists and practitioners have to rethink their theory and practice continually and devise appropriate strategies for the workplace.Methods: A qualitative→/+quantitative paradigm is used. Theoretical reflections on career counselling’s response to what is happening in society and, more particularly, the workplace are provided first. Examples from two research projects are then given of contextualizing, decontextualizing, recontextualizing, and co-contextualizing in qualitative and quantitative research (in disadvantaged contexts in particular). Results: The findings demonstrate the importance of relating contextual challenges to career counselling issues and concepts and of embracing newer ideas such as career and self-construction and life design (in addition to more traditional approaches). Dealing with policy matters is essential before the focus can be shifted to policy implementation.Conclusions: Career counselling theory and practice in developing countries in particular differ from context to context. Traditional career counselling still predominates even though what works well in one part of the world may not work elsewhere because of socioeconomic and cultural disparities. Relating contextual challenges to career counselling concepts is essential. Action/Impact: Ongoing contextualization, decontextualization, recontextualization, and co-contextualization of career counselling theory and practice is the way forward theoretically and practically to help clients flourish instead of merely ‘survive’ in the 4th industrial revolution (Work 4.0). It will also enhance the short-, medium-, and longer-term effect of career counselling globally.

                                              Affiliation: Department of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education, University of Pretoria, Groenkloof Campus, Groenkloof, South Africa


                                              Presenter: Mary McMahon (Australia)

                                              Title: Systems mapping: A foundation for telling career stories

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                                              Abstract: Career development is a complex and dynamic process that may be accommodated by systems thinking. Emanating from general systems theory, systems thinking recognises the inseparability of parts and wholes. Systems thinking permeates most contemporary career theories which in general have afforded greater attention to the context in which career development occurs. The Systems Theory Framework (STF) of career development is specifically derived from systems theory. Corresponding with greater recognition of context has been greater emphasis on narrative approaches to career counselling which encourage clients to tell their career stories. Practical applications of the STF employ systems mapping to assist adults and adolescents to construct and tell rich systemic stories. My System of Career influences (MSCI) is a systems mapping process based on the STF. The aim of this research was to investigate how systems thinking and systems mapping facilitates the telling of career stories by adolescents. The case studies of two secondary school students who completed the MSCI systems mapping exercise as a basis for telling their career stories will be presented. The findings revealed rich contextual career stories that considered relationships with significant others such as parents and also influential experiences from a range of settings including home, school, part-time work, and sport. The findings suggest that systems thinking can be taught and that systems mapping provides a foundation and stimulus for the telling of rich integrative systemic career stories. Systems thinking and systems mapping offer a future agenda for career research and practice.

                                              Bio: University of Queensland, Australia


                                              Presenter: Zhi-Jin Hou (The People’s Republic of China)

                                              Title: The Challenges and Opportunities of Counseling Psychology in China

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                                              Background: Although the emerging need for mental health in China is rapidly increasing, there are not enough well-trained professionals to offer high quality services. The trainings in universities is still not enough. Therefore, how to meet the thriving needs is a big challenge and also opportunity for counseling psychology.
                                              Methods: Personal interview and focus group will be used to investigate university counseling centers’ directors, counseling professors, students in counseling programs. CQR analysis will be used to analysis the data.
                                              Action/Impact: The coping strategies from macro level and micro level will be discussed and the reform suggestions for training will be proposed. More cooperation among counseling, clinical psychology, social work and collaboration among universities, communities, and professional organizations will be advocated.
                                              Abstract Summary: With the speedy change of the society in China, the emerging need for mental health is rapidly increasing in recent years. However, lack of well-trained professional counseling psychologist is a big challenge for this situation. Little studies have been done to examine what are the specific challenges and risks for professional trainings from different perspectives. The purpose of current study is to investigate how counseling centers’ directors and professors (representing the employers) and students (representing the potential employees) think about the situation in counseling field. Relevant government documents on mental health issues, counseling program requirements for students and mental health news on social media in recent month will be collected in order to generate interview questions. Then we will do interviews with university centers’ directors, community mental health centers’ directors, counseling professors and students in counseling programs about how they perceived the mental health situation in China, and the challenges of professional trainings they have met in their organizations. Finally, we will use the consensual qualitative research (CQR) method to analysis the transcripts of interviews and try to establish an ecosystem model. The coping strategies and reform suggestions will be proposed, especially the cooperation among government, university, community and professional organizations.

                                              Authors::
                                              Zhi-Jin Hou, Faculty of Nursing, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang City, The People’s Republic of China
                                              Jing Ni, School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, The People’s Republic of China
                                              Zhihong Qiao, School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, The People’s Republic of China
                                              Sili Zhou, China women's university, Beijing, The People’s Republic of China


                                              Presenter: Frederick T. L. Leong (USA)

                                              Title: TBC

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                                              Background: A new model of adaptability, the Diversified Portfolio Model (DPM) of Adaptability, is introduced. In the 1950s, Markowitz developed the financial portfolio model by demonstrating that investors could optimize the ratio of risk and return on their portfolios through risk diversification. The Model: The DPM integrates attractive features of a variety of models of adaptability, including Linville’s Self-complexity Model, the Risk and Resilience Model, and Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory. The DPM draws on the concept of portfolio diversification, positing that diversified investment in multiple life experiences, life roles, and relationships promotes positive adaptation to life’s challenges. Impact: The DPM provides an integrative model of adaptability across the biopsychosocial levels of functioning. More importantly, the DPM addresses a gap in the literature by illuminating the antecedents of adaptive processes studied in a broad array of psychological models. The DPM is described in relation to the biopsychosocial model and propositions are offered regarding its utility in increasing adaptiveness. This new model of adaptability will be useful to counselors and psychotherapists by integrating the dimensions of positive psychology and diversity which are central tenets in the field of Counseling Psychology. Conclusions: We believe that the integration of the diversified portfolio model into psychology can contribute to the advancement of the discipline. In this paper, we outline the foundations of the model, present testable research propositions and offer recommendations for future research.

                                              Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA


                                              Presenter: Marucia Patta Bardagi (Brazil)

                                              Title: Career guidance in South America: Same concerns, different solutions

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                                              Abstract: Diversity in South America’s counseling theories and interventions is a well-known characteristic, based on main influences each country have in terms of psychological and sociopolitical affiliations. Through a literature review of publications from the last 15 years and by consulting career guidance/counseling associations, we aimed to describe main research topics, number of counselors working in different workplaces, and some future directions to research and practice. Among results, it is visible that psychodynamic, Marxist and developmental approaches are emphasized both in research and interventions. Very little is done in terms of public policies in career counseling and development, and that is the main concern of researchers and practitioners. A large number of publications are related to intervention descriptions, but empirical and longitudinal studies are increasing in the continent. Only few of the analyzed publications are written in English and published in north American or European journals, which indicates little internationalization. Although different countries in the continent need to address their specific challenges for counseling in different and extreme opposite social, economic and educational conditions, there is a necessity of improving counseling training and evaluation methods all over the continent, and moreover, there is an urgency to bring visibility to South Americas’ research and counseling results, and spread the good practices and results south American counsellors are obtaining in group interventions and in helping people in high vulnerability contexts.

                                              Authors:
                                              Marucia Patta Bardagi, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil
                                              Marco Teixeira, Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
                                              Rodolfo Ambiel, Universidade de S. Francisco, Campinas, Brazil


                                              Susan C. Whiston & David L. Blustein

                                              Susan C. Whiston & David L. Blustein

                                              Title of Symposium: The Impact of Work in an Age of Uncertainty

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: In this presentation, the major findings from a comprehensive qualitative study of working in the U.S., known as the Boston College Working Project, are presented. This study explored the experiences of 61 adults using a purposive sample from a diverse array of settings and backgrounds. Guiding the project are a number of assumptions derived from the psychology of working framework and theory. First, working, at its best, can link us to a sense of being fully alive in the world. Second, working exposes people to the full range of social and economic problems that are endemic in our society. Third, working can fulfill a number of fundamental needs, including the need for survival, social connection, and self-determination. In this study, this need framework has been expanded to encompass the need to contribute to the social good, need to care for others, and the need to work without oppression and marginalization.

                                              The results highlight the cohering theme that two profoundly disparate experiences of working exist within the U.S.; some work for survival and struggle to eke out an existence while others work for self-determination and experience feelings of satisfaction and accomplishment in their work lives. In addition, this study identified a growing sense of social and psychological erosion in the workplace, which was manifested in increased self- and other blame, as well as a fragmented sense of security. The presentation will conclude with future research directions and implications for public policy based on the very rich findings from this study.
                                              Background/Rationale: Much knowledge about the future of work is based on quantitative research, neglecting the insights from individuals who are living in the midst of a radically transforming work context. The project described in this presentation is designed to fill a growing gap in the literature on the future of work.Methods: The participants were obtained via an intentional process of seeking out a broad range of people who are engaged in either seeking work or working. The overall qualitative method that we used in this project is based on an adaptation of narrative inquiry with an infusion of content analysis.
                                              Results: The results yielded a comprehensive perspective on the nature of working in contemporary America, culminating in a broadened taxonomy of needs that working can fulfill and numerous insights into the ways in which working evokes both a sense of aliveness and despair.
                                              Conclusions: For the participants working primarily for survival, the growth of precarious work and neo-liberal policies has profoundly eroded decent and dignified work. Those with more resources, education, and volition are also struggling, although in a very different way than those who are struggling to sustain their livelihoods.
                                              Action/Impact: The presentation will examine the impact of these findings, highlighting a number of implications for individuals who are seeking ways to manage the workplace. Also, implications for public policy will be summarized, underscoring the role of applied psychologists as informed advocates for more humane and decent work options for all.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Susan C. Whiston, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
                                              David L. Blustein, Boston College, Department of Counseling, Development, and Educational Psychology, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA

                                              Presenter: Susan Whiston

                                              Title: Meta-analyses of career choice interventions: Providing effective interventions

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                                              Abstract: This presentation will summarize the findings from a set of meta-analyses on career choice interventions. A random-effects meta-analysis of all outcomes included 57 published and unpublished studies and produced an average weighted effect size of .35. Seven separate meta-analysis were conducted on the outcome measures of vocational identify, career maturity, career decidedness, career decision-making self-efficacy, perceived environmental support, perceived career barriers, and outcome expectation. Studies that utilized the outcome of career decision-making self-efficacy had the largest effect size (.45). Although this effect size was homogenous, tentative moderator analyses were conducted and counselor support was found to be most important. Implication for practice and future research will be discussed.

                                              Background /rationale: It has been almost 20 years since the last meta-analysis of career counseling (i.e., Brown & Ryan Krane, 2000) was conducted. This meta-analysis is a replication and extension of Brown and Krane.
                                              Method: Seven random-effects meta-analyses were conducted using 57 studies.
                                              Results: Of the seven meta-analyses that were conducted, career decision making self-efficacy had the largest effect size (.45). Moderator analyses indicated that counselor support (ES = .83) and values clarification (ES = .52) are critical ingredients in career choice counseling.
                                              Conclusion: The weighted average effect size of .35 is consistent with previous research. The critical ingredients of counselor support and values clarification are different from the critical ingredients found by Brown and Ryan Krane.
                                              Action/Impact: It is important to provide effective services to help individuals make career choices and this meta-analysis has critical findings related to providing efficacious services.

                                              Bio:


                                              Presenter: Whitney Erby; AJ Diamonti; Lily Konowitz; Erin Kilbury; Ellen Gutowski; Alekzander Davila; Chad Oll; David L. Blustein

                                              Title: Historical marginalization and modern employment precarity: African-American experiences in the Boston College Working Project

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                                              Abstract: Precarious work is increasingly endemic in the modern economy. We have to know more about the particularity of how groups perceive precarious work. African-Americans have historically faced marginalization at work; as such, it is important to examine how the history and current experience of racism relates to the growth of precarious work. To begin to explore this question, we conducted a qualitative study based in narrative inquiry, which revealed that African-Americans in this study cope with precarious work situations in different ways. For some, tensions between work and family were the most salient; some viewed precarious work as a stepping stone to further opportunities, while others viewed it as the result of marginalization. Implications for career counselors and public policy decisions will be discussed.
                                              Background /Rationale: Precarious work is increasingly endemic in the modern economy. Given the historic and current challenges that marginalized communities face in their work lives in the U.S., we believe that an in-depth examination of the growth of precarious work is particularly critical for African-Americans.
                                              Methods: As part of a larger study of work experiences, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine individuals self-identifying as Black or of African descent. The interviews were analyzed and coded using narrative inquiry methodology, which goes beyond merely reporting what participants shared by embedding participant impressions into a meaning-making framework. Results: The results reveal African-Americans in this study cope with precarious work situations in different ways. For some, tensions between work and family were the most salient, some viewed precarious work as a stepping stone to further opportunities, while others viewed it as the result of marginalization. Conclusions: The relationship between work and social connections, barriers to advancement, and work as a source of motivation were prominent for the African-Americans in this study. Additionally, underemployment and unemployment were dominant themes.
                                              Action /Impact: Understanding how precarious work affects African-American workers has significant implications for career counselors and policy makers. Effective policies and evidence based interventions are necessary to better serve African-American workers.

                                              Authors:
                                              Whitney Erby
                                              AJ Diamonti
                                              Lily Konowitz
                                              Erin Kilbury
                                              Ellen Gutowski
                                              Alekzander Davila
                                              Chad Oll
                                              David L. Blustein

                                              Discussant: Valérie Cohen-Scali;


                                              Teresa Maria Sgaramella

                                              Teresa Maria Sgaramella

                                              Title of Symposium: Resources and needs of migrant and refugee youth: giving voice to different actors in different contexts for a positive and future oriented counseling

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: Active participation and future life construction of asylum seekers, migrant and refugee youth are a challenge for professionals whether they deal with health/school counseling or career guidance. Here the most adequate approaches to assessment and intervention are still under debate, as well as the way cultural background of the country of origin, and personal history can be taken into account in counseling actions.
                                              A positive contextual approach underlines the symposium. Findings from both qualitative and quantitative studies conducted in countries with a different long lasting experience in migration phenomena will be described. Suggestions to professionals interested in an active participation and life design construction of young migrants will be then provided.
                                              The peculiarity of the symposium deals with the approach undertaken, that is giving voice to both migrant youth and professionals, and conducting an analysis of both needs and psychological resources available to migrant youth, and addressing both school and career guidance issues to find out an fil rouge in counselors’ actions.
                                              The emphasis on exchange among psychologists from around the world in their common effort of finding science-based solutions to “real world” problems, namely in counseling practice, further link the analysis carried out to the congress goals.
                                              The first presentation gives voice to migrant youth in Italian context and highlights individual resources they ascribe to themselves, besides barriers they experience in school and family, for their successful inclusion and life designing.
                                              The second presentation by describing works on resettling stressors, underlines the relevance of a positive reading of personal history in school counselling together with suggestions for counselling practice in school and community-based supports for refugee youth and families in Canada.
                                              The third presentation opens the view to their future life construction by focusing on what career guidance counsellors and practitioners need to know about the guidance needs and experiences of asylum-seeking, refugee and migrant youth in order to support their work life designing.
                                              Findings from recent reports in several European countries with different experience on migration issues and challenges will be provided, together with results from actions and programs currently under implementation.
                                              The discussant will summarize findings reported and highlight the impact on counseling practice.
                                              Among others issues she will also discuss what is there specific in the vulnerable condition experienced by migrant youth with respect to other vulnerabilities of different origin, and the actions foreseen or under implementation.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy

                                              Presenter: Teresa Sgaramella

                                              Title: TBC

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                                              Abstract:

                                              Bio:


                                              Presenter: Lea Ferrari

                                              Title: Positive resources and future: a comparison between Italian and migrant youth in vocational high schools

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                                              Background/rationale: This study found its rationale in the literature on acculturation that shows migrants prefer integration strategies and these are related to high level of adaptation. It aims to explore differences between Italian and migrant students as concern positive involved in successful life designing.
                                              Methods: Ninety-three vocational high school students were involved: 43 of them arrived from South America, East of Europe, North Africa. They answered a quali-quantitative survey that assessed a set of positive resources, acculturation attitudes, strategies for coping with career indecision, barriers and supports.
                                              Results: A series of analysis of variance showed migrant students perceived higher level of courage, resilience, decisional productive coping and propensity to integration than Italian students who recorded higher propensity to assimilation and less negative view of the future. Migrant students who preferred integration strategies showed also higher level of hope, optimism and decisional productive coping. Thematic analyses showed more frequent barriers in migrant adolescents concerning family problems and relationships with peers. Studying difficulties similarly occurred in both groups. Optimism and waiting something positive happen were strategies migrant youth considered more useful; focus on the problem and work hard were more useful for Italian students.
                                              Conclusions: Results suggest working with migrant students requires to value integration strategies, to devote attention to contextual factors and promoting strategies focused on the problem.
                                              Action/Impact: Implication for equity and inclusion will be discussed.

                                              Affiliation: Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy


                                              Presenter: Rosalynn Record-Lemon and Marla Buchanan

                                              Title: School-Based Support for Canadian Refugee Children and Youth: Experiences of Implementing a Trauma-Informed Counselling Program

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                                              Background/Rationale: Canada has experienced a recent influx of refugee claimants who have sought resettlement due to violence, war, crime, and/or fear of persecution (UNHCR Canada, 2016). School-based supports and resources can potentially play a key role in facilitating the adjustment, coping and well-being of refugee children and youth.
                                              Methods: The present study uses narrative inquiry to examine the experiences of school counsellors implementing a standardized school-based trauma-informed program with refugee children and youth. Participants are provided training in the program and are followed throughout their implementation experiences. Thematic content analysis is used to capture themes that emerge in the counsellors’ narratives of their experiences.
                                              Results: Key themes regarding the experiences of school counsellors implementing the program and concerning the support needs of refugee children and youth are described. The findings of this study are discussed with regards to implications for counselling practices and for future research concerning school and community-based supports for refugee children, youth and their families.

                                              Conclusion: School-based trauma-informed counselling programs potentially offer a low-barrier means of providing support to refugee children and youth. Understanding the benefits, challenges and crucial factors required for implementing these programs is an important component of providing support for refugee children and youth.

                                              Action/Impact: The intended impact of the present research is providing detailed insight regarding the experiences of implementing trauma-informed counselling programs with refugee children in Canadian schools and regarding what is needed for future advancement and implementation of trauma-informed programs.

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Rosalynn Record-Lemon, Counselling Psychology, University of British Columbia. Co-Owner and Counsellor - Emergence Counselling and Wellness Group
                                              Marla Buchanan, Royal Canadian Legion Professorship in Group Counselling and Trauma, Counselling Psychology, University of British Columbia


                                              Presenter: Hazel Reid

                                              Title: Researching the career guidance needs of asylum-seeking, refugee and migrant populations: a case study from the UK.

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                                              Background/rationale: The presentation draws on a UK literature review and needs analysis for a three year EU project, to develop curriculum material for the training and professional development of career guidance counsellors working with migrant and refugee populations. The project includes Germany, Sweden, Italy, Turkey, Lithuania and the UK.
                                              Methods: The literature was organised around potential themes for a curriculum. Semi structured interviews were used for the needs analysis and the summary shared with participants.
                                              Results: The findings across the five countries surveyed were very similar, indicating that whilst there is considerable literature on services for migrant and refugee populations within education and employment practice, there is very little specifically related to career guidance and counselling. The needs analysis was undertaken with expert career guidance practitioners, student career guidance counsellors, lecturers working in HE on relevant programmes, counsellors working with migrant and refugee clients within charitable organisations, and a former refugee. The results of the needs analyses across the five countries, again, was very similar.
                                              Conclusions: The presentation will focus on the UK findings from the first two stages of the project, the literature review and the needs analysis. It will highlight what was found in the literature review, but focus on the needs analysis - what career guidance counsellors and practitioners need to know about the guidance needs and experiences of asylum-seeking, refugee and migrant populations. To illuminate the presentation quotes from the former refugee will be included.
                                              Action/Impact: A significant ‘stand-alone’, or integrated course will be designed, tested and disseminated.

                                              Affiliation : Professor of Education & Career Management, Faculty of Education, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UK


                                              Presenter: Peyman Abkhezr, Mary McMahon, Kevin Glasheen, and Marilyn Campbell

                                              Title: A narrative inquiry into life-career stories of young African people with refugee backgrounds: Re-contextualising agency

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                                              Background: Challenging circumstances before and after resettlement impact young people with refugee backgrounds’ (YRB) sense of voice and agency that limit their career development options. Little research has been conducted on the career development of YRB after resettlement, particularly qualitative research that can generate culturally and contextually pertinent experience-near data that could identify potential relevant ways of assisting them with their career development needs after resettlement.
                                              Methods: Narrative inquiry facilitated the exploration of five participants’ life-career stories through interviews. Data was analysed using voice centred relational analysis.
                                              Findings: The unique plot of each participant’s story reflected the operation of various voices, relationships and social structures, influential in constantly reshaping future career plans throughout the migration journey. Participants’ reflections on the experience of participating in narrative inquiry interviews and storying their life-career stories suggested an enhancement of their sense of agency.
                                              Conclusions: A re-contextualisation of previous life-career stories of YRB that reflected their strength, skills and achievements in their post-resettlement context through storytelling and narrative inquiry was a useful process that enhanced their sense of agency.
                                              Implications: The possibility of working with YRB as career storytellers and the usefulness of narrative approaches to career counselling for finding voice and enhancing their sense of agency was clarified.

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Peyman Abkhezr, Queensland University of Technology, Faculty of Education, School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia
                                              Mary McMahon, The University of Queensland, School of Education, School of Education, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, Brisbane, Australia
                                              Kevin Glasheen, Queensland University of Technology, Faculty of Education, School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia
                                              Marilyn Campbell, Queensland University of Technology, Faculty of Education, School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia

                                              Discussant: Mary McMahon


                                              Frederick T. Leong

                                              Frederick T. Leong

                                              Title of Symposium: Cross-Cultural Career Interventions

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Background: It is has long been acknowledged that the field of vocational psychology has been dominated by Eurocentric models. Recent work on our overemphasis on Western Educated Industrialized Rich Democratic (WEIRD) samples in Psychology provides additional confirmation of this problem. Furthermore, most of the models of career interventions have been formulated and focused on the United States. The purpose of this symposium is to counter that trend by examining career interventions in different countries and cultures.
                                              Focus of Symposium: This symposium, to be presented by career psychology experts from multiple countries, will highlight how the cultural context and cultural differences may influence the models, methods, and measures used in these career interventions. Instead of the usual single discussant at the end of the symposium, the discussion portion will consist of a dialogue among presenters in comparing and contrasting their models with questions from the audience.
                                              Presenters: Each presenter will provide an overview of their model of career intervention and discuss the practical challenges for career interventions in their cultural context and also the future research directions needed to advance the field. The presenters have been selected to represent multiple countries and cultures: Maria Paul Paixao from Portugal, Rodolfo Ambiel from Brazil, Jean Hou from China, and Frederick Leong from the United States.
                                              Action/Impact: This symposium will stimulate more theory building and research regarding career interventions embedded within various countries and highlight the importance adaptation to cultural contexts that illustrate the value indigenous approaches.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Michigan State University, Department of Psychology, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

                                              Presenter: Rodolfo Ambiel (Brazil)

                                              Title: Career assessment and interventions in Brazil: past problems, current challenges, future opportunities

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                                              Abstract:
                                              Background: At the origin of the vocational guidance in Brazil, the development and use of assessment instruments marked the work of the professionals widely, following worldwide trends. This initial characteristic led to a broad development of research with instruments, especially in relation to the adaptation of foreign measures and the construction of national instruments. However, the same fact provided that the performance of psychologists in this area obtained a social recognition marked by expectations regarding the quick and objective results from the so-called "vocational tests". Model: recently, there has been an increase in interest in Brazilian literature focusing on career narratives approaches such as Career Construction Theory and Life Design Paradigm.
                                              Action / impact: In this presentation, two independent but interconnected actions will be reported. Initially, the development of an online intervention on career adaptability will be detailed, highlighting its positive impacts and unexpected results. Then, the author will present an effort, still in an early stage of development, to use results from inventories of interest in a narrative approach.
                                              Conclusions: it is concluded that in the Brazilian context there are advances in the sense of having studies in the area of evaluation and intervention if they are career-aligned with what has been produced in other countries historically more advanced in these issues, although the challenge of making such advances widely available and applied in practice are still a challenge. For the future, it is understood that Brazil can collaborate with the methodological and scientific advance of the area of career counseling.

                                              Affiliation: São Francisco University. Campinas, Brazil.


                                              Presenter: Maria Paul Paixao (Portugal)

                                              Title: Career counseling in Portugal: are we converging to a career resources model?

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                                              Abstract: According to recent approaches, the role of life design and career counseling in promoting the reform of the education and training systems should include a systematic and articulated set of preventive, intervention and compensation measures, with the main following goals : a) allow the involvement of young people in the school context; b) prevent the drop out of school; c) allow the integration/ reintegration of at-risk youth and of adults looking for an improvement in their qualification ; d) promote the effective transition to the world of work; e) promote the acquisition of career management and employability skills (in young people and adults). Although, in Portugal, a psychological model of career counseling practice has been mainly implemented (with specific entry requirements and both specific competence and job profiles), a promotional and preventive lifelong conceptual approach was adopted, and it has been tentatively translated to the existing competence frameworks used in the design, implementation and evaluation of career interventions. Within this approach, different strategies (individual and group counselling, consultation, vocational facilitators’ training, among others), have been taken into account. Nevertheless, although there is widespread positive evaluation about the usefulness of career counseling, some questions need a special attention, namely those related to the formal training of career providers in ICT and in dealing with especially vulnerable groups. Future research should focus on the effectiveness and process of interventions, the organizational providers of career services and also on environmental aspects relevant to the quality of career services.

                                              Affiliation: University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal


                                              Presenter: Zhou Xiaolu & Weiqiao FAN (China)

                                              Title: The Role of Significant Others in Chinese Youths’ Career Development: Communication, Consulting, and Involvement under the Globalization and Glocalization Background

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                                              Abstract:
                                              Background: The Influence of globalization and glocalization in culture, politics, and economics on Chinese youths’ career development and career intervention. Collective cultural background; Chinese youths’ career is not only their own career, but also largely associated with significant others’ (e.g., family/parents’) career.
                                              Method: Use of empirical survey and meta-analysis
                                              Results: Interpersonal Relatedness significantly predicted career exploration of Hong Kong students; Collective efficacy from parents, teachers, and peers significantly contribute to adolescents' career-related matters; Family orientation significantly contributed to Hong Kong college students;
                                              Conclusions: Based on several empirical studies, significant others’ influences on the career development of Chinese youth (such as college students, secondary students) are well supported. What’s more, career development and intervention among Chinese people, especially youth, shows particular characteristics associated with Chinese cultural features such as collectivistic values.
                                              Impact: Developing indigenous theoretical models and assessment instruments for Chinese youths; enhancing professional training and education for Chinese youths; and improving career-related knowledge and developing positive attitudes toward career counseling, intervention and education for Chinese youths.

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Zhou Xiaolu, Ph. D. (Co-author and presenter) - Associate Professor, Department of Management, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, China
                                              Weiqiao FAN, PhD (HKU). (Lead author) - Professor, Department of Psychology, Shanghai Normal University; & Deputy Director, Shanghai Institute of Career Education


                                              Presenter: Frederick Leong (the United States)

                                              Title: A Cultural Formulation Approach to Career Counseling

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                                              Abstract:
                                              Background: Just as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) has gradually moved towards a multidimensional model that accommodates for additional factors, Leong and Lee’s (2006) Cultural Accommodation Model (CAM) also involves incorporating multi-faceted considerations for psychotherapy. An essential element in the CAM is the recognition of the need to accommodate for culture-specific variables or cultural differences in our clients in relation to our conceptualization of psychopathology (or presenting problems) as well as the process and outcome of psychotherapy.
                                              Action: In this paper, we extend the CAM by proposing that the DSM IV Outline for Cultural Formulation may serve as a useful conceptual framework for guiding the practice of career assessment and career counseling. Following psychiatry’s recognition of the impact of cultural variations in the self on psychopathology, clinical diagnosis and psychotherapy, we propose that it is time for vocational psychologists to also systematically include the conceptualization of cultural identity in their career assessment and career counseling practice.
                                              Impact: Consistent with the DSM IV Outline, our paper will consist of a discussion of the extant literature on culture and self as it pertains to the five dimensions of the Outline. This will inclusion a discussion of (a) Self and Cultural Identity, (b) Self and Cultural Conception of Career Problems (c) Self in Cultural Context, and (d) Cultural Dynamics in Therapeutic Relationship. The final dimension of the Outline focused on “Overall cultural assessment for diagnosis and care” will be illustrated with a case study.

                                              Affiliation: Michigan State University, Department of Psychology, East Lansing, Michigan, USA


                                              Valérie Cohen-Scali & Jacques Poyaud

                                              Valérie Cohen-Scali & Jacques Poyaud

                                              Title of Symposium: Perception of work and the future among low qualified youths in northern and southern countries: first results of an international qualitative research project

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: The globalization of the economy has led, in many countries, to an increase in precarious work and the informal economy. Young people are among the most affected by these changes in the world of work and few of them are employed in decent work. A qualitative research project has been implemented on both objective and subjective aspects of work among a population of young workers with low levels of education in different parts of the world. The symposium aims are to present the first results of our research findings and to draw new lines of career counseling interventions for young people in precarious work situations. Guðbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir will present research based on narratives of Icelandic young workers showing that their work is generally conceived as temporary and that they hope to have better work in the future. Valérie Cohen-Scali et al. will present a comparison of young low-educated workers’ representations regarding work from three countries and will underline the role of social and cultural contexts on career counseling interventions. Donna San Antonio will focus her presentation on rural American young workers and on the factors that may contribute to stifling or supporting resilience and hope for the future. Marcelo Ribeiro et al. have compared representations of work of young workers from Portugal and from Brazil and observed different forms of decent work according to the working contexts conditions and dynamics. David Blustein will discuss the results of these different research studies and provide some insights about the lines to draw for the future in career counseling policy and practice.

                                              Sponsor: ESVDC AND UNESCO UNITWIN NETWORK
                                              “Life designing interventions (counseling, guidance, education) for decent work and sustainable development” (2017-2022)

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Valérie Cohen-Scali, Inetop-Cnam & University of Bordeaux, Paris, France
                                              Jacques Poyaud, University of Bordeaux - Laboratory of Psychology, University of Bordeaux, Paris, France

                                              Presenter: Guðbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir, University of Iceland

                                              Title: “This is ‘in-between work’…you might work here for a year and then you find something else”: Representations of decent work among young people with low employment skills

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                                              Abstract: Although work has become more precarious in today’s societies it is still greatly valued. Work needs to be meaningful in order to form a basis of self-respect and access to decent work is a fundamental aspect of well-being. Finding decent work is a challenge for young people who have no formal training after compulsory education. The results from ten interviews with people from age 20 to 24 are reported. The participants have had no formal training after leaving compulsory education at the age of 16. The data will be analyzed with a thematic content analysis grid designed collectively by the international study group. Preliminary findings suggest that the participants are preoccupied with their failures at school and with the hindrances they are experiencing in their working life. They are also experiencing the downside of the social class system. Participants stay in their jobs because of the money, but not because they like the job in particular. Young people without formal training after compulsory education find themselves in a position of pursuing jobs for the money and not finding jobs that are meaningful to them. Young people in this situation should be assisted in finding meaningful work, similar to their peers that have remained in the educational system. Actions that reach out to young adults without any formal training can be to develop psychometric measures and counselling methods. Development of psychometric measures of decent work and work situation could be undertaken in order to examine whether they are experiencing decent work, both objectively and subjectively.


                                              Presenter: Valérie Cohen-Scali (Cnam, Paris, France),
                                              Laurence Cocandeau-Bellanger (Catholic University of Angers, France),
                                              Soazig Disquay-Perot (Catholic University of Angers, France),
                                              Jonas Masdonati (University of Lausanne, Switzerland),
                                              Issa Abdou Moumoula (University of Koudougou, Burkina-Faso)

                                              Title: Representations of work among young adults in Europe and Africa and perspectives for career counseling

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                                              Abstract: The precariousness in the labor market has deleterious effects on health and identity of individuals. Young people are particularly exposed to bad quality of work. The aim of the research is to identify and to compare the representations of work among young low educated workers in different parts of the world. Qualitative research has been conducted using open questionnaires. Thirty young adults have been interviewed in three countries: ten in Switzerland, ten in France, and ten in Burkina-Faso. Data have been processed using thematic content analysis and textual data processing software. The results underline the importance of informal work in Burkina Faso as compared to the other countries. It also shows differences between those groups regarding the working conditions. However, similarities are also observed regarding the expectations about work and the place of work in the lives of young people. The research shows the diverse facets of the representations of work among low-educated young workers and the importance of work to them. To build more effective career counseling interventions for low-qualified young workers in developing and developed countries, this research underlines the importance to take into account social, economic, and cultural contexts. Studying the situations of young workers in different parts of the world will allow us to reconsider current career counseling interventions and develop more suitable and efficient career counseling strategies, taking into account the specificities of labor market contexts.


                                              Presenter: Donna San Antonio

                                              Title: The Identity Construction--Cultural Context–Aspirational Desire Triangle in the Working Lives of Disadvantaged Rural Emerging Adults

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                                              Abstract: Abstract: After the global recession, employment in the US has rebounded to a ten-year low of 4.1%. However, in rural areas, improvements in rates of employment have lagged behind. For rural emerging adults seeking to be employed in a satisfying job, a high school diploma and acceptance to college is the way out of economically disadvantaged rural areas. But what about the emerging adults without a high school diploma? This presentation will present preliminary findings using narrative analysis of in-depth qualitative interviews with ten, rural, emerging adults who are working and do not have a high school diploma. The focus of this inquiry is on work qualities, such as, personal satisfaction, social connection, working conditions, growth possibilities, agency, and how current work fits into life course planning and future aspiration. The study considers the dynamic relationship among three key theoretical paradigms: Identity construction and meaning-making; socio-cultural context; and aspirational desire unbounded by cultural context. Findings from an earlier study suggest that, while there was regret for decisions made and a feeling of “being left behind” for some research participants, there was also a hopeful sense about the future. For some, however, hopefulness was not articulated. This presentation will explore the factors that may lead to a sense of hope and future orientation for some and not for others. The presentation will call for increased attention to rural areas and specific recommendations will be made for policies and practices for school-based counselors working with adolescents.

                                              Affiliation: Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, USA


                                              Presenter: Marcelo Afonso Ribeiro - University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)
                                              Paulo Cardoso- University of Évora (Portugal)
                                              Maria Eduarda Duarte - University of Lisbon (Portugal)

                                              Title: Perception of decent work and the future among low qualified youths in Brazil and Portugal: Preliminary results

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                                              Abstract: Brazil and Portugal have different working contexts. While Brazil has mixed formal and informal working environments, formal working contexts prevail in Portugal. These varied contexts have produced different forms and modes of representations of work, understood as personal meanings co-constructed through relationships and practices that guide actions and everyday experiences. By means of in-depth interviews, this study sought to understand and compare the perception of decent work and the future among 20 low qualified youths in Brazil and Portugal through a thematic content analysis of their narratives grounded in life course design paradigm. The main findings of the Brazilian sample have indicated the predominance of a moralistic and mercantile view of working, mainly produced by informal relationship networks and informal learning. And the main findings of the Portuguese sample have shown the predominance of work as mean of survival, autonomy construction, and personal development. A preliminary conclusion suggests that Northern and Southern countries have produced distinct forms of decent work according to working contexts, conditions, and dynamics. Moreover, there may also be a continuum of situations in which the premises of decent work are more or less present. The implications for career guidance and counseling practices to promote decent working trajectories are discussed, as well as the impacts on the international research agenda on this theme.

                                              Discussant: David Blustein


                                              Rachel Gali Cinamon

                                              Rachel Gali Cinamon

                                              Title of Symposium: Career Development of Marginalized‪ Groups: Theoretical and Social Justice Implications‬ ‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: Work experiences of disadvantaged groups receive relatively low empirical attention in generic models of vocational psychology, which, usually focuses upon white western middle-class populations. As a result, our understanding of the complexity of the intersection between the individual and society in the challenging process of career development is limited.
                                              The current symposium will shed light upon the career experiences and challenges of vulnerable groups along with relevant and sensitive conceptual frameworks. Blustein and Kenny will present emerging critical perspectives such as humanitarian work psychology and the psychology of working, along with relevant literature on human rights and decent work as a conceptual basis for research and practice. Richard Young’s presentation will describe the unique career challenges of young people who have intellectual or development disabilities, and will provide empirical evidence as to how goal-directed joint action can lead to the construction of life-enhancing careers. Gerstein and Hutchison will summarize three studies on future perceptions of emerging adults from three different locations: Hong Kong, the U.S. and Israel, and suggest culturally social justice initiatives including how psychologists can assist young adults to enhance their quality of life. Cohen-Scali et. al. will present a study on the authentic work experiences of ten young, low-educated workers in Africa and the complexity of work and marginalized youth, and the role of work in the construction of their identity.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation:

                                              Presenter: David L. Blustein and Maureen E. Kenny

                                              Title: Work as a Human Right: Engaging Psychology in the Struggle for Decent Work

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                                              Abstract: This presentation articulates a call for applied psychologists to respond to transformative work challenges by fostering research that will advance the Decent Work Agenda of the United Nations and International Labor Organization. Recent and ongoing changes in the world are contributing to a significant loss of decent work, including a rise of unemployment and precarious work. By failing to satisfy human needs for economic survival, social connection, and self-determination, the loss of decent work undermines individual and societal well-being, particularly for marginalized groups and those without highly marketable skills. We present emerging critical perspectives (e.g., Humanitarian Work Psychology; Psychology of Working) and relevant literatures related to human rights and decent work, which serve as guideposts to the relevant specialties within applied psychology to enrich the knowledge base that will inform efforts to expand access to dignified and decent work. We conclude by offering exemplary research agendas that focus on examining the psychological meaning and impact of economic and social protections, balancing caregiving work and market work, making work more just, and enhancing individual capacities for coping and adapting to changes in the world of work. These examples are intended to stimulate new ideas and initiatives for psychological research pertaining to work as a human right. Background/Rationale: this presentation is based on a critique of existing discourses in applied psychology, which we argue have neglected vast cohorts of people who work and who wish to work. Our rationale for this presentation is embedded in a careful analysis of contemporary applied psychology practices and scholarship. Methods: The material presented in this presentation is not a formal empirical study or a literature review; rather, the methodology is based on critical psychology, which has informed our approach of analyzing the current set of discourses and proposing alternative perspectives to guide our field. Results:the results of this critical analysis are to 1) recommend that applied psychology link more intentionally to the objectives of the International Labor Organization; and 2) to adopt critical theories and perspectives to support efforts to expand the impact for all citizens who work and who wish to work. Conclusions: we have identified two particular perspectives—Humanitarian Work Psychology and the Psychology of Working as meta-perspectives that will foster more inclusive and impactful scholarship and practices by applied psychologists. Action/Impact: We identify several new lines of inquiry that we believe will help applied psychologists to embrace the mission of the Decent Work Agenda and related perspectives both in public policy and psychology (e.g., research on universal basic income; caregiving and marketplace work).

                                              Affiliation: Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts, USA


                                              Presenter: Richard A. Young, Sheila K. Marshall, and Tim Stainton

                                              Title: Constructing career for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities: The perspective of goal-directed action

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                                              Abstract: Career development, specifically obtaining decent work, is challenging for many young people because of a variety of economic and political conditions. It is particularly challenging for young people who have intellectual or development disabilities (IDD), who often encounter significant barriers in engaging in economic and social activities.
                                              Based on a re-conceptualization of career from the perspective of goal-directed action, the action-project method was used to examine the joint projects between the parents of young people with IDD and between parents and the young people themselves.
                                              Several joint actions between these two sets of participants contributing to the young persons’ construction of career were identified, including supportive or re-negotiating relationships, planning, equipping the young person for future endeavors, balancing other family needs, and coping with challenges. The resources needed for these projects successfully were identified. The proposed conceptualization and findings emphasize self-determination and empowerment not by isolating the person from social support but by identifying explicitly and facilitating how these joint actions lead to the construction of life-enhancing career. The publication of these findings has impact on developing research agenda using the perspective of goal-directed action, which is particularly important given the population of young people with IDD, whose agency as actors in their own lives can easily be discounted.

                                              Affiliation: University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


                                              Presenter: Lawrence H. Gerstein, and Ashley N. Hutchison

                                              Title: Emerging Adults’ Future Perceptions: Implications for Social Justice Initiatives

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                                              Abstract: Emerging adulthood (Arnett, 2000) is a time when individuals, in part, think about their identity and life story (McAdams & McLean, 2013), and contemplate and decide on their vocational choices and life domains (Dolli, 2012; Erikson, 1968; Nurmi, 1991; Super, 1990). Emerging adulthood starts in the late teens and continues into the mid-twenties. During this period, persons also reflect more seriously on their future. Such reflection is often called one’s future perceptions. These perceptions encompass an individuals’ view of their future events, ambition, and life roles (Seginer, 1988). Not surprisingly, future perceptions are important in identity construction and career development (Bandura, 2001; Nurmi, 1991). This presentation will highlight three qualitative studies targeting the future perceptions of emerging adult Hong Kong women, and U.S. and Israeli women and men. Each study was guided by Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) and Career Construction Theory (CCT; Savickas, 1997). Along with a summary of the results discovered in these studies that were derived from thematic analysis, the presentation will offer implications of the findings for social justice initiatives including how psychologists can assist emerging adults to 1) balance their work-family roles and responsibilities, 2) enhance their quality of life, 3) secure and maintain their leisure time and activities, 4) address their financial aspirations, challenges, and obligations, and 5) engage in their communities. Prevention, psychoeducation, and systemic strategies grounded in SCCT, CCT, developmental theory, and strategic and social justice paradigms will be introduced to address items 1-5 just mentioned.

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Lawrence H. Gerstein - Department of Counseling and Department of Counseling Psychology, Social Psychology, and Counseling, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, USA
                                              Ashley N. Hutchison - Department of Counseling Psychology and Community Services, The University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA


                                              Presenter: Valérie Cohen-Scali, Issa Abdou Moumoula and David Blustein

                                              Title: Representations of work among youth in developing countries: the case of young workers in Burkina-Faso

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                                              Abstract: Decent work is characterized by a set of minimum objective standards, such as fair incomes, good working conditions, security, social protection (ILO). These elements are central for workers’ health and their overall well-being. Numerous researchers in psychology have also emphasized the role of the subjective aspects of work, such as social connections and self-determination (as reflected in the Psychology of Working Theory). The aim of this presentation is to reflect on the subjective aspects of work for marginalized youth in developing countries. Ten semi-directive interviews have been conducted with young low educated workers in Burkina Faso (Africa) about their representations of work. A thematic content analysis was carried out. The results show that these young workers do not perceive their job as decent and are mainly motivated to fulfill their survival needs by having a salary. They also conveyed some attachment to their work and are satisfied with being able to do their job well. Their work, albeit unsatisfactory in terms of their interests, plays a key role in the development of their social life, their family relations and the development of future perspectives. This study underlines the complexity of the representations of the work of marginalized youth as well as the importance of work for their identity and socialization.

                                              Affiliation: Valérie Cohen-Scali, Inetop-Cnam & University of Bordeaux, Paris, France
                                              Issa Abdou Moumoula, University of Koudougou, Burkina-Faso
                                              David L. Blustein, Boston College, Department of Counseling, Development, and Educational Psychology, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA


                                              Michael Di Mattia

                                              Michael Di Mattia

                                              Presentation: A global snapshot of Counselling Psychology: history; challenges and opportunities.

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: This presentation will briefly explore the history and status of Counselling Psychology across the world, including strengths and common challenges facing the profession. It will discuss ways Counselling Psychology can continue to thrive, maintain its unique identity and play an important role as an applied branch of psychology.

                                              Affiliation: Lecturer & Counselling Psychologist, Monash University, Faculty of Education, Clayton, Australia


                                              Marcelo Alfonso Ribeiro

                                              Marcelo Alfonso Ribeiro

                                              Presentation: Hybrid understanding and intercultural dialogue: A way to construct career counseling contextualized approaches

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: Latin American practices of career counseling draw heavily on Northern epistemologies without considering local specificities. This has engendered de-contextualized practices and has led to difficulties in helping people, as well as the need of changes into these practices, mainly by incorporating contextualized approaches. Methods
                                              This paper aimed to present, exemplify, and evaluate a career counseling framework that blends the global North epistemology of social constructionism with contextualized theories from the South. For achieving that, an intervention research was conducted, and effectiveness of the strategy proposed was qualitatively evaluated. A case study exemplified the proposal. Results: The proposed framework has been constructed from two movements of production of knowledge through hybrid understandings and intercultural dialogues. First, hybrid understandings between epistemologies from North and South; and, secondly, hybrid understandings between the counselor’s scientific knowledge and counselee’s everyday life knowledge. Seven basic principles for career counselling were posited. Conclusions: Every practice in career counseling should be contextualized to make sense to counselees. Hybrid understandings and intercultural dialogues can be potential actions to achieve this; nevertheless, any proposed practice should always be tested through a diatopical hermeneutics, in which the knowledge of all involved is considered in this construction process. Action/impact: Although it was designed for the Latin American contexts, the proposed hybrid and intercultural framework for career counseling suggests a way to build knowledge, does not posit the very concepts, what may allow it to be possibly applied to any contexts in which de-contextualized practices have been taking place.

                                              Affiliation: Professor, Social and Work Psychology Department, University of Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil


                                              Gabriela Aisenson

                                              Gabriela Aisenson

                                              Presentation: Interrogating Life Project concept: Attempting Sustainable Life-Paths and Decent Social Insertions In Vulnerable Young People

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: Based on our action-research with socially vulnerable young people (with discontinuous educational paths, homeless, offenders of criminal law, teen mothers and fathers), the goal is to raise a critical debate on the notion of life designing, future and project. In terms of research, we are interested in understanding the weight of social determinants in the biographical narrative of the trajectories, the ability to project to future and dialectically to these processes, the construction of identity, aiming to the social justice and the improvement of opportunities for the most vulnerable sectors. In order to avoid acting as a prescriptive and standardization factor, we stand out the need to set up a reflexive and extended notion of project that prevent personal aspirations being delegitimated or end to perpetuate social exclusion. Outlining specific initiatives for this population, may contribute to promoting sustainable decent life-paths with decent social insertions, adjusted to the values and needs of each group.

                                              Affiliation: Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina


                                              Lea Ferrari

                                              Lea Ferrari

                                              Presentation: Career and life designing in children with and without disability: the involvement of parents and teachers

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: Life design is a postmodern approach based on the paradigm of social constructivism which aims to address the many career related challenges people has to cope with across life. It conceptualizes career development as a dynamic interaction between personal characteristics and contextual factors: people actively contribute to their own personal and career development in interdependence with the multiple systems (i.e. organizations, societal policies, and practices) in which they are embedded that, in turn, influence the human functioning. Focusing on children and youth, parents and teachers are attributed a preventive role in working for changing already ending story of people who for many reasons are at risk of failure and marginalization. In this presentation the state of the art as concern the role of these contextual resources in promoting successful adaptive career life designing of children and adolescents with and without disability will be discussed.

                                              Affiliation: Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology – University of Padova, Padova, Italy


                                              Marcel Monette

                                              Marcel Monette

                                              Presentation: Le conseiller en counseling de carrière comme agent de changement : promouvoir le travail décent

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: L’organisation internationale du travail souligne que la moitié des travailleurs dans le monde sont extrêmement pauvres (2005) et que la crise touchant l’emploi des jeunes s’amplifie (2013). La situation en Amérique du Nord semble bien différente de ce portrait. Pourtant l’entrée sur le marché du travail pour les jeunes et les immigrants est difficile et la qualité de vie au travail n’est pas toujours au rendez-vous. C’est dans ce contexte que la Chaire de l’UNESCO sur l’orientation tout au long de la vie s’est donnée comme un de ses objectifs de promouvoir le travail décent. Cette orientation invite les conseillers en counseling de carrière à jouer un rôle différent dans leurs interventions, à savoir : celui d’un agent de changement. En s’appuyant sur la littérature en counseling pour la justice sociale et sur les travaux de LeBossé pour développer le pouvoir d’agir, nous allons décrire des pistes d’intervention pour amener le conseiller en counseling de carrière à faire la promotion du travail décent.
                                              Dans un premier temps, il importe de définir ce qu’est le travail décent. A cet égard, deux équipes internationales y travaillent. Une première équipe, dirigée par Geneviève Fournier, de l’Université Laval, s’attache au développement et à la validation d’un questionnaire transculturel sur la relation au travail. Quant à l’équipe, dirigée par Duffy et Blustein du Boston College elle développe et valide une échelle des représentations du travail décent. Les résultats de ces enquêtes et le document « Advocacy Competencies » développé par la section des conseillers pour la justice sociale de l’ACA, serviront de matériel de base pour travailler auprès des formateurs de conseillers et des conseillers eux-mêmes. L’idée est d’échanger avec eux sur les notions de travail qui a du sens et de travail décent, puis de les amener à évaluer dans quelle mesure leur milieu de travail leur permet de vivre cela. La deuxième étape vise à identifier les barrières que le milieu peut ériger pour nuire à l’atteinte de ces objectifs. Une troisième étape permettra de cibler des actions concrètes à mettre en place dans leur milieu et à identifier les compétences requises pour le faire.
                                              Le fait de faire vivre une démarche qui favorise la mise en place de conditions favorisant, pour eux, un travail qui a du sens et un travail décent, outillera les conseillers pour intervenir auprès de l’ensemble des membres de leur organisation pour qu’à leur tour ils aient la perception de vivre un travail qui a du sens et un travail décent. De plus, cette démarche vise à amener les formateurs de conseillers à donner plus de place dans la formation des conseillers au rôle d’agent de changement pour qu’ils puissent mieux, entre autres, faire la promotion d’un travail qui a du sens et d’un travail décent.

                                              Affiliation: Professor, Laval University, Laval, Québec, Canada


                                              Hsiu-Lan Shelley Tien

                                              Hsiu-Lan Shelley Tien

                                              Presentation: Career Themes perceived by Young Adults: the Viewpoint of Chaos Theory in a Chinese culture

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: Chaos Theory applied in Career Counseling has been influenced the young adults in Chinese society. However, they do not understand the true meaning of Chaos and just agreed that the career future might be unpredictable. The purpose of the current study was to help the young adults perceive the constant, complexity, and chances in career chaos. We first interviewed 30 adults in narrative approach to realize the young adults’ perception of career uncertainty, complexity, and unpredictable change. The narrative interview were taped and transcribed. The research team then analyzed those transcripts and did cross-participant grounded analysis. The results indicated three stages of chaos process: awareness of uncertainty, insight the chaos status, and looking for the calling. Sub-categories within the selective coding and axial coding were described in this report. We will continue the analysis and report the meaning of chaos, awareness, and calling perceived by the young adult participants. Finally, all findings will be discussed regarding theoretical implication and practice application.

                                              Affiliation: Professor, Educational Psychology and Counseling, Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan


                                              Nadya Fouad

                                              Nadya Fouad and Romila Singh

                                              Presentation: Engage: Factors that facilitate men and women persisting in engineering

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: This presentation will report the results of ENGAGE, a study that investigated factors that contribute to men’s and women’s decisions to persist in engineering careers. Women are underrepresented in the field of engineering at every level. Most of the research on effective interventions has focused on increasing women’s choice of engineering major. However, though women are now 20% of engineering graduates only 11% of professional engineers are women (National Science Foundation, 2016). In fact, the proportion of women engineers has declined slightly in the past decade, suggesting that, while the pool of qualified women engineering graduates has increased, they are not staying in the field of engineering. Over 2000 men and women currently working in engineering responded to our survey. We will report on the findings related to environmental supports and barriers, differences between men and women and predictors of staying engaged in an engineering profession.

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Nadya Fouad - Mary and Ted Kellner Endowed Chair of Educational Psychology and University Distinguished Professor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
                                              Romila Singh - Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


                                              Susana Almeida Lopes

                                              Susana Almeida Lopes

                                              Presentation: Career Unbundling: A Case Study in a Law Firm

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: The ascending career track leading to partnership, where lawyers in the some cohort (same experience years) are comparatively evaluated in order to advance towards partnership is being threatened by the new normal juncture (Davis, 2009), where fewer career opportunities may be expected (Muir et al., 2004; Pinnington, 2011; Stumpf, 2007). The new business like environment, where drop in demand/fees are the norm, requires more productivity and additional skills beyond legal expertise from lawyers (Mottershead, 2010). The most talented lawyers are technically inclined but lack managerial strengths (Lopes, 2016). A career management paradox is suggested: how to retain the most talented and simultaneously develop the talents needed for firms’ sustainability?
                                              An innovative career track was implemented in a Portuguese law firm in order to overcome the new challenges. Climbing the career ladder demands accumulating the minimum number of points necessary to progress to the following career level. The time it takes to climb the ladder is directly linked with performance/talent. High performers are entitled to a fast career track by cumulating more points in performance appraisals. Their peers are also invited to develop their career at the firm, however at a slower pace. Lateral hires are also considered by taking in seniority on the basis of experience/talent, and the minimum number of points required for progression to the next career level is determined. Lawyers can also benefit from their extraordinary contributions to the firm, e.g., media recognition, academic acknowledgement, among others, which can be translated into extra points that count for their career track record.
                                              Progressing for more senior levels demands lawyers to take a potential assessment and to present an application. This allows an in-depth analysis of lawyers’ talents and promotes career self-management (Duarte, 2009). Responsibility is required from lawyers, as the decision to apply for the next career level is left up to them. Results of this case study are presented and implications for career management are discussed.

                                              Affiliation: Faculdade de Psicologia da Universidade de Lisboa | VdA Academy


                                              Keeyeon Bang

                                              Keeyeon Bang

                                              Presentation: History, Current Status and Future Direction of Counseling Psychology in Korea

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to provide readers an account of the development, current status, and future direction of counseling psychology in Korea. The formation and professionalization process of clinical supervision in Korea was mainly held by the Korean Counseling Psychological Association (KCPA). Since the 1970s, the KCPA has a credential system that regulates requirements for being a counseling psychologist and publishes the Korean Journal of Counseling Psychology. Future opportunities, potential barriers and strategies for counseling psychologists is presented as well.

                                              Affiliation: The Cyber Univ., Seoul, Korea


                                              SpeakerName

                                              Donna Schultheiss, Brittan Davis, and Sneha Pitre

                                              Presentation: Career Development of Migrants and International Students: Current status and Future Directions for Theory, Research and Practice

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: The global economy and political landscape have fueled the voluntary and involuntary movement of people across national and cultural boundaries. Although many migrants expect to find meaningful work in their host country, most face many challenges and experience a dramatic downturn in their career opportunities post migration. Similarly, international students face numerous barriers such as language and cultural barriers, discrimination, social isolation and loneliness, acculturative stress, academic difficulties and unmet career needs. This presentation will report on the current status and future directions for theory, research and practice.

                                              Affiliation:Donna E. Schultheiss - Interim Dean, College of Graduate Studies, Cleveland State University


                                              Anusha Kassan

                                              Anusha Kassan

                                              Presentation: Ensuring Cultural and Social Justice Responsiveness in Assessment with Children and Adolescents

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: The importance of attending to client diversity is hard to refute across mental health fields (American Psychiatric Association, 2013; American Psychological Association, 2002; Canadian Psychological Association, 2017; Mental Health Commission of Canada, 2016; Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, 2015). Yet, clients frequently report instances of cultural and social insensitivity on the part of mental health professionals (Arthur & Collins, in press; Ratts, Singh, Nassar-McMillan, Butler, and Rafferty McCullough, 2016; Zane, Nagayama-Hall, Sue, Young, & Nunez, 2004). Attending to client diversity is critical in order to ensure a collaborative helping relationship, which leads to a more comprehensive and holistic assessment (Ibrahim, & Heuer, 2016). Whether one is conducting an assessment in the form of a psychiatric evaluation, a structured psycho-social battery, or a clinical interview, the role and impact of culture and social justice need to be considered. This presentation will highlight how an inclusive conceptualization of culture as well as a consideration of social justice can be beneficial in informing clients’ multiple and intersecting cultural identities and social locations as they relate to the assessment process. Recommendations for cultural and social justice responsiveness in assessment will be presented.

                                              Affiliation: Assistant Professor, University of Calgary


                                              Maria Paula Paixão

                                              Maria Paula Paixão

                                              Presentation: Self-determination, identity building and resilience: implications for the design of career interventions

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 16: Counseling

                                              Abstract: The distinction made by self-determination theory (SDT) between the “bright” and the “dark” pathways of development results from an ever-growing body of research already carried out in several developmental contexts, which highlights the main pathways or trajectories that promote growth, integration and well-being or that, inversely, facilitate vulnerability to risk conditions, ill-being and even psychopathology. In the career/life realm, a seemingly consistent group of studies has been focusing on the antecedents of identity development and well/ill being in normative adolescents (attending formal education branches), and also in young offenders. This recent research points out to the fact that contextual need support, the experience of need satisfaction and a subjective sense of competence facilitate autonomous decision-making and well-being, while contextual need thwarting, the experience of need frustration and disruptive cognitive processes seem to promote controlled exploration and decision-making, and a concurrent sense of ill-being. In contemporary liquid and globalized societies, individuals are called upon to take responsibility and effectively manage their careers and life paths, although they present differentiated potentials for an integrated and healthy psychosocial functioning, due to their non-linear career construction processes in critical life contexts. Thus, taking into account substantive evidence, we argue for the need to validate an integrated conceptual model of the contextual, and cognitive-motivational antecedents of career identity and adjustment that clearly differentiates promotional, preventive and psychotherapeutic counseling and consulting career interventions, within an integrated model focused on building more self-determined identity construction processes associated with adaptive and healthy development.

                                              Affiliation: Associate Professor, University of Coimbra, Portugal


                                              IAAP Division 17: Professional Psychology


                                              James H. Bray

                                              James H. Bray

                                              Presidential Address: International Perspectives on Integrated and Primary Health Care

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 17: Professional Psychology

                                              Abstract:

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation:


                                              Lyn Littlefield

                                              Lyn Littlefield

                                              Keynote Address: Building the capacity of professional psychology and the services they deliver

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                                              Sponsoring Division: Division 17: Professional Psychology

                                              Abstract:

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Australian Psychological Society


                                              Robyn Vines

                                              Robyn Vines

                                              Title of Symposium: The role of psychology in integrated mental health care: an international perspective

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Division 17: Professional Psychology

                                              Abstract: This symposium will provide an overview of current progress in integrated psychological service delivery in the primary care setting in a number of western countries: USA, Australia, Canada, Norway and the United Kingdom. These integrated services attempt to redress the ongoing “medicalisation of unhappiness” across the western world for which medication is frequently seen as the first and only treatment of choice, leaving the crucial psychosocial dimensions of mental and general health undertreated. Primary Care Psychology is a growing area of practice and service delivery, at the core of which lies a collaborative model of mental and general health care involving appropriately trained psychologists working with family physicians in the general practice setting. Research evidence indicates that this integrated mental health care approach for complex, often comorbid physiological and psychological conditions, results in best outcomes for patients. The key objective of the model of care is to provide evidence-based interventions for common mental health disorders previously under- and inappropriately-treated (eg. depression, anxiety and stress disorders), chronic disease and its behavioural and mental health sequellae, and frequent comorbid conditions (such as alcohol and other drug disorders) presenting in the primary care setting. It enables the “right treatment, at the right time, in the right place” and prevents the stigma and fragmentation of care still frequently associated with referral to secondary and tertiary treatment facilities. Current research, service delivery and funding models, and optimal training frameworks to facilitate an integrated model of care (eg. those recently introduced at the APA) will be explored, as well as barriers to the optimal roll-out of these psychological services. The symposium will focus on evidence-based primary care interventions and training models, and will provide an up-date on current progress in facilitating this multidisciplinary model of care and workforce development internationally.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Clinical and Health Psychologist, Bathurst Rural Clinical School, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Bathurst, Australia

                                              Presenter: James H. Bray

                                              Title: Primary Care Psychology in the United States: Addressing Behavioural Health and Substance Use Problems in Primary Care

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                                              Abstract: Primary care psychology is an exciting new area for the profession. In the U.S., primary care medical providers treat over 70% of mental health and substance use problems, without assistance from psychologists or any other mental health providers. The opportunities in primary care psychology necessitate additional knowledge of primary care and different skills in caring for primary care patients. This presentation will discuss (1) the present status of psychologists working in primary care in the United States and its relationship to the health care reforms that are occurring; (2) practice opportunities in primary care in private and public settings; (3) the use of technology and electronic health records in primary care practice; (4) the most common mental health and substance use problems seen in primary care; and (5) future challenges in developing integrated health care systems and training models for the future of psychology practice.

                                              Affiliation: President, American Psychological Association
                                              Past President, Texas Psychological Association
                                              Chairman and Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Texas San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA


                                              Presenter: Tor Levin Hoffgard

                                              Title: Making change happen. Getting from general ignorance, to a future with integrated teams in primary care

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                                              Abstract: High priority on health promotion, prevention and early intervention has been agreed upon by the World Health Organization as the only sustainable way to meet the challenge of the growing number of people struggling with mental health problems in the world. Still, most countries put their resources almost exclusively into hospitals, and treatment of severe health problems. In this talk I will present how it can be different. I will present examples from Norway - and what we have seen as major developments in the policy on mental health in the last 10 years. From general ignorance of the whole idea of primary care, through policy change, piloting of services, evaluation, to the near future with integrated primary care teams with psychologists as key collaborators with all other services in the municipalities.

                                              Affiliation:


                                              Presenter: Susan H. McDaniel & Laurie Sands

                                              Title: Collaborative Care for a Complex, Life-Threatening Problem: An Example Of Systemic Integrated Care

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                                              Abstract: Rather than constructing a narrative about the work of this family and their healthcare team, this presentation will use actual quotes from videos and emails to allow the participants tell the story of integrated care with an 82-year-old woman who immigrated to the US with multiple serious medical and mental health problems and her 54-year-old son. The collaborative team caring for this family included the referring family physician, a family therapy postdoctoral fellow, and the presenter--a family health psychologist.

                                              Affiliation:


                                              Presenter: Jean Grenier & Marie Helene Chomienne

                                              Title: Challenges in Collaboration in Primary Care, the importance of being earnest

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                                              Background: With the arrival in office of a new administration, the Canadian federal government is focusing on transferring health funds to the provinces for mental health. This transfer of funds to provinces with insistence on improving mental health services may (or may not...) open up new avenues to increasing Canadians’ access to evidence-based psychological treatments.
                                              Objectives: To discuss some of these new political developments and their potential impacts on primary care psychology will be discussed. Method: Overview of the differents models across Canada: We will presnt and discuss concrete forms of collaborative practices for psychologists that already exist at the primary care level and how this may vary from province to province. Results ; Synthesis of the barriers and success stories in collaborative practice of Psychology in Primary Care Conclusion On going challenges, including the various degrees of collaboration that can truly exist at the primary care level on a day-to-day basis, opportunities for training future primary care psychologists, as well as opportunities for improvements in all of these areas, will also be presented and discussed.

                                              Affiliation:
                                              Jean Grenier, Professeur clinique associé à l'École de Psychologie, Université d'Ottawa

                                              Professeur adjoint au département de Médecine familiale, Université d'Ottawa
                                              Co-Directeur - Unité de recherche en soins primaires de l'Institut de recherche de l'Hôpital Montfort
                                              Institut de recherche de l'Hôpital Montfort, Ottawa, Canada
                                              Marie-Hélène Chomienne, Professeur-adjoint au département de médecine familiale et au département d'épidémiologie, Université d'Ottawa

                                              Co directrice Unité de recherche en soins primaires , Institut de Recherche Hôpital Montfort(IRHM), Ottawa, Canada


                                              Presenter: Professor Peter Kinderman

                                              Title: Psychological wellbeing in primary care : the UK perspective

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                                              Abstract: Since 1946, the UK’s National Health Service has aspired to an integrated healthcare system, including both psychological and physical heath, with an emphasis on health promotion, prevention and early intervention, and led or coordinated through our General Practitioner (Family Doctor) primary care service. Clinical psychology has, over the past 20 years, played a key role in this, with a rapid growth in the number of clinical psychologists employed in the UK. Investment has targeted CBT, for mild-to-moderate depression and anxiety, in adults of working age, and in primary care, although the programme is now broadening to children and young people, older adults, psychotic problems and problems associated with medical conditions. In addition, political developments, including putting commissioning power in the hands of primary care physicians and an emphasis on wellbeing at central government level, are significant for primary care psychology. This presentation will focus on likely future developments, and the consequences for clinical psychology, including our relationship with other professions, especially CBT and other psychological therapists, and will argue that, especially in primary care, we must retain a focus on helping people maintain their functioning and wellbeing rather than focus too much on treating mental illnesses.

                                              Affiliation: Past President, British Psychological Society
                                              Professor of Clinical Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, University of Liverpool, UK


                                              Presenter: Diana L. Prescott

                                              Title: Access to Behavioral Healthcare for Rural Populations

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                                              Abstract: Access to behavioral healthcare for rural populations is a major concern shared by psychologists in Europe and the United States. Integrated care provides an exciting new way for the profession to provide access to behavioral healthcare for the underserved, including those in rural, less populated areas. In the U.S., primary care medical providers treat over 70 percent of mental health and substance use problems, without assistance from psychologists or any other mental health providers. Integrated care provides a vehicle to provide timely psychological intervention for major health problems, such as depression/suicide substance abuse, and obesity. This presentation will highlight (1) rural psychology practice; (2) integrated care practice; (3) the use of technology and electronic health records in integrated care; (4) depression, suicide, and other mental health problems in rural areas; (5) the crisis of substance abuse and addiction; and (6) how rates of pediatric obesity can be effectively reduced through integrated care psychology practice.

                                              Affiliation: Clinical Psychologist
                                              Hampden Psychological Consultation, PLLC, Hampden, Maine, USA

                                              Convenor/Discussant: Robyn Vines


                                              IAAP Division 18: History of Applied Psychology



                                              CPA Section: Aboriginal Psychology


                                              Jeff Ansloos

                                              Jeff Ansloos

                                              Keynote Address: Critical Indigenous Suicidality

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Aboriginal Psychology Section and Rural and Northern Psychology Section

                                              Abstract: Significant inequities exist in mental health outcomes for Indigenous people, especially among Indigenous youth and the issue of suicide. Suicide rates among Indigenous youth in Canada are six-times higher than among non-indigenous youth, and among the highest in the world. While commitments to psychological research have been made in the area of suicide prevention in the last three decades, suicide rates have remained stable and in some regions, increasing. While most of this research has been driven by a public health framework, the vast majority of studies do not engage with the structural aspects of suicide and suicidality (i.e., colonialism, economic apartheid, racism). Recent national Indigenous initiatives emphasize a number of key shifts necessary within research strategies and programming approaches. These frameworks advocate for comprehensive, contextually-informed, values-based and culturally responsive frameworks that are informed by critical, participatory and decolonial methodologies (Ansloos, 2017a; White et al., 2016; White and Mushquash, 2016). Similarly, critical movements in suicide scholarship are promoting shifts towards dynamic ecological reflexivity and sociopolitical action within the structural aspects of suicide prevention. These perspectives present a number of key challenges for psychological research and practice. This presentation will focus on Indigenous approaches to suicide prevention, as well as national actions needed for to align the field of psychology with Indigenous self-determinism. Further, this presentation present opportunities for considering the field of psychology and the role of psychologists in rural and northern contexts of practice to be oriented by a critical-community praxis perspective, and to embolden psychological action on the...

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Toronto/OISE


                                              Lynn Lavallee

                                              Lynn Lavallee

                                              Keynote Address: Indigenous Healing, Sports, and Reconciliation of Psychology

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Aboriginal Psychology

                                              Abstract: Dr. Lavallee discuss how Indigenous sports, wellness, and ceremony are a basis for reconciliation and healing from colonial psychological trauma within Indigenous communities. Implications for how psychologists and other mental health workers can support this process of healing and reconciliation will be made.

                                              Bio: Dr. Lavallee is the Vice Provost of Indigenous Engagement at the University of Manitoba. Dr. Lavallée also holds an appointment as Associate Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management at U of M. She is a national and international leader in Indigenous health research. Her research and teaching expertise include Indigenous mental health, cultural, sport and recreation programs, Indigenous epistemology and Indigenous research methods.

                                              Affiliation: University of Manitoba


                                              CPA Section: Addiction Psychology


                                              CPA Section: Adult Development and Aging


                                              CPA Section: Brain & Cognitive Science


                                              Adam Sandford

                                              Adam Sandford

                                              Title of Symposium: Mechanisms of Face Processing and Person Recognition

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Brain and Cognitive Science

                                              Abstract: The face processing and person recognition literature has developed at rapid pace in recent years and has been collated in a series of books on a diverse range of topics (e.g., Bindemann and Megreya, 2017; Bruce and Young, 2012; Calder, Rhodes, Johnson, and Haxby, 2011; Hole and Bourne, 2010). This timely symposium will compliment these developments in the literature by inviting experts in the field to discuss underlying mechanisms and issues in the perception of faces for the purpose of identification. These issues have been exposed in the literature over the last 40 years, and researchers have strived for a better understanding of how we can collaborate with community partners (e.g., law enforcement, border security, automated recognition system technologies) to implement evidence-based practices in their face recognition activities. Most recently, a body of evidence on the role of within-person variability has shown a potential solution to face recognition errors by showing participants multiple different, high-varying, images of the same person’s face. The aim of the symposium is to present evidence of underlying mechanisms that support person recognition and potential solutions to the known issues highlighted in the literature. Five distinguished speakers will discuss unique areas of concern in the literature and connect potential solutions to identified issues. Importantly, these solutions have applicability to contexts where face verification and person recognition are required. Errors in identification/recognition have high stakes, making this timely symposium significant for academics and community partners.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation:

                                              Presenter: Nicolas Ruffieux, Simon Ruffieux, Denis Lalanne, Roberto Caldara

                                              Title: iKnowU – Multimodal Smart Glasses for the Decoding and Rehabilitation of Face Processing in Clinical Populations

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                                              Abstract: Among individuals presenting with visual impairment, the inability to identify faces and decode facial expressions of emotion is systematically reported as being very disabling for social interactions. We present iKnowU, an explorative study using smart glasses to facilitate face and facial expression recognition for visually impaired individuals. Using collected information about the user’s relatives, friends and colleagues, the iKnowU smart glasses automatically recognize their presence in the visual field of the camera, their identity and emotion. This information is directly reported to the user using tailored feedback. The system was tested with five individuals presenting with severe visual impairment due to various etiologies. Through four experiments in indoor and outdoor conditions, we observed that this visual aid could significantly improve their ability to identify faces and facial expressions of emotion. Worldwide, approximately 32 million people are blind and 191 million live with moderate to severe visual impairment. There is currently no effective tool available to assist patients with face and emotion processing. This population thus represents a large number of individuals who could greatly benefit from this new visual aid. These preliminary studies demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of visual prostheses for face and emotion identification, and offer novel and interesting directions for future wearable see-through devices.

                                              Affiliation: Nicolas Ruffieux - University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
                                              Simon Ruffieux - University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland
                                              Denis Lalanne - University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
                                              Roberto Caldara - University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland


                                              Presenter: Tyler Roberts

                                              Title: Assessing the informational content of face representations via image reconstruction

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                                              Abstract: Reconstructions of the visual experience associated with viewing and remembering individual faces has been successfully carried out with the use of behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data as well as, more recently, with electroencephalography (EEG) data. However, a comparison of different modalities regarding their ability to support facial image reconstruction along with their relative reliance on different types of visual properties (e.g., face shape and surface) is lacking. Here, we evaluate and compare the outcomes of facial image reconstruction based on fMRI, EEG, and behavioral data. To this aim, we investigate the ability to reconstruct, from each modality, images of adult male faces displaying different emotional expressions through the reconstruction of their constituent shapes and surfaces. Behavioral and EEG-based reconstruction appear to perform equally well in terms of average accuracy, followed by their fMRI counterpart. From a methodological standpoint, EEG stands out by its ability to characterize the temporal dynamics of face encoding by supporting reconstruction for distinct time intervals, whereas fMRI provides insights regarding the cortical locus of facial identity processing. Further, from a translational standpoint, our results pave the way for clinical applications (e.g., characterizing visual distortions in face perception with prosopagnosic patients) as well as forensic applications (e.g., automatic neural-based ‘sketch artists’).

                                              Affiliation:

                                              Authors: Tyler Roberts, Dan Nemrodov, Natalia Drobotenko, and Adrian Nestor


                                              Presenter: Matt C. Fysh

                                              Title: Human-Computer Interaction in Face Matching

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                                              Abstract: Automatic facial recognition is becoming increasingly ubiquitous in security contexts such as passport control. Currently, Automated Border Crossing (ABC) systems in the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU) require supervision from a human operator who validates correct identity judgements and overrules incorrect decisions. Currently, the extent to which human decisions in these tasks are influenced by automated recognition judgements remains unknown, but represents an important practical question for these applied settings. In the present research, an analogy to this human-computer interaction was explored under laboratory conditions, where observers matched pairs of faces that were already labelled onscreen as depicting the same identity or two different identities. The majority of these labels provided information that was consistent with the stimuli presented, but some were also inconsistent or provided ‘unresolved’ information. The impact of this information on identity judgments made by observers was explored over a series of experiments, which showed consistently that human face-matching decisions can be heavily biased by external information such as those provided by automated facial recognition systems.

                                              Affiliation: University of Kent, University of Kent Canterbury, United Kingdom


                                              Presenter: Meike Ramon

                                              Title: Super-Recognizers in law enforcement - hype or hope?

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                                              Abstract: Face processing skills are characterized by an impressive range. Recently, so-called “Super-Recognizers” (SRs) who excel at face matching and/or recognition have been reported. Current developments and widespread CCTV coverage have triggered an increasing interest in SR-deployment in certain fields, e.g. law enforcement. Problematic is that while SRs as a group excel at tasks of face processing, individual SRs show highly heterogeneous behavioral patterns. Moreover, the applied value of superior performance at empirically developed tests remains undetermined.
                                              Six SRs (5 previously published and one novel case) assisted suspect identification in ongoing criminal investigations of the Cantonal Police of Fribourg. The process involved two stages: estimation of SRs’ suspect identification ability based on CCTV footage and suspect line-ups from previously solved cases, and the ongoing cases.
                                               
                                              Three SRs provided highly accurate perpetrator identification for the previously solved criminal cases, whereas the remaining did not. Interestingly, performance on empirical tests of face processing did not predict perpetrator identification performance.
                                               
                                              These findings highlight the necessity for tools assessing ecologically meaningful face processing skills to determine the value of SR application in law enforcement. The heterogeneity reported in scientific studies supports this notion and raises the question of whether SR can actually be identified in the absence of applied assessment.
                                              Commonly used empirical tests may have limited informative value for identification of individuals with superior face processing skills with real-life importance. These findings provide the basis for the large-scale assessment tool currently developed in collaboration with the State Office of Criminal Investigation in Berlin.

                                              Affiliation: University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland


                                              Presenter: Rob Jenkins

                                              Title: How many faces do people know?

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                                              Abstract: Despite decades of psychological research into face perception, no one has attempted to estimate the number of faces that individuals know. It is perhaps surprising that such a basic question has gone unaddressed for so long. In linguistics, the number of words that people know (vocabulary size) has been intensively studied, and has clear implications for word reading and other verbal abilities. By analogy, the size of one’s vocabulary of facial identities may explain documented variations in face recognition ability. In this talk, I will describe recent work in which we quantify vocabularies of facial identities for the first time. I will report likely upper and lower bounds for this estimate as well as large individual differences.

                                              Affiliation: University of York, York, United Kingdom


                                              CPA Section: Clinical Psychology


                                              Aislin Mushquash

                                              Aislin Mushquash

                                              Keynote Section Chair Address: Show Me the Evidence: Why Clinical Practice Guidelines Matter to Psychologists

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Clinical Psychology

                                              Abstract: Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) are specific recommendations for practice developed using a transparent process that incorporates the best available evidence and the involvement of relevant stakeholders (Beauchamp, Drapeau and Dionne, 2015). When rigorously developed and carefully implemented, CPGs help to synthesize the best available research in a given area in a way that supports clinical decision-making, accelerates the translation of research findings into clinical practice and informs practitioners, consumers, funders and policy-makers about what can reasonably be expected from a given intervention. The use of CPGs to guide clinical work has become the norm in many healthcare professions (e.g., medicine, nursing) and in many settings where psychologists may work. The number of CPGs being produced has increased exponentially over the past decade and attention has recently turned to concerns about the quality of guidelines being produced, particularly as some organizations seek to use CPGs as a proxy for standards of practice. This address will provide an overview of the potential benefits and risks of CPGs for psychologists wanting to practice in an evidence-based way, and will highlight the Clinical Section's efforts over the past 3 years to draw attention to this issue and to provide resources to our members and others who may be interested.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Lakehead University


                                              CPA Section: Clinical Neuropsychology


                                              Vina M. Goghari

                                              Vina M. Goghari

                                              Section Chair Address: Brain Training: Exploring the Effects of Cognitive Training in Healthy Adults

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Clinical Neuropsychology

                                              Abstract: Enhancing cognitive ability is an attractive concept, particularly for healthy adults interested in maintaining cognitive functioning and preventing age-related declines. Computerized individual cognitive training has been investigated as a safe method of cognitive enhancement in younger and older adults; however, this burgeoning field of training cognitive domains, remains highly controversial with empirically-backed disagreements at all levels of evidence, including individual studies, systematic reviews, and even meta-analyses. I will present a research program investigating changes in both behavioural and neural correlates after cognitive training in healthy adults.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Toronto Scarborough


                                              Maureern Schmitter-Edgecombe

                                              Maureern Schmitter-Edgecombe

                                              Keynote Address: Supporting Functional Independence in Our Aging Population: Naturalistic Assessment and Emerging Technologies

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                                              Sponsoring Section:

                                              Abstract: Accurate assessment of functional capacities and the development of interventions that can support functional independence are critical for preventing negative health outcomes in the aging population. Current understanding of functional impairment in older individuals has been limited by the need to rely on proxy measures for functional assessment, including self- and informant-based questionnaires and performance-based laboratory tests. Naturalistic assessment methods and emerging technologies offer neuropsychologists novel opportunities for studying human behavior within the everyday environment. These newer technologies can learn an individual’s pattern of routine everyday activities and capture more ecologically valid, impartial and frequent measures of change. Such methods of data collection have the potential to improve diagnostic decision making and test interpretation, increase understanding of real-world compensatory strategy use, inform clinic-based test development, and provide a mechanism for real-time functional interventions. In this presentation, the relationship between cognitive correlates and functional abilities will be discussed. Work demonstrating how sensor-based data can be used to provide information about everyday functioning will also be discussed. This talk will further illustrate how smart technologies that intervene in real-time can be used to support functional independence.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Washington State University


                                              CPA Section: Community Psychology


                                              CPA Section: Counselling Psychology


                                              Anusha Kassan

                                              Anusha Kassan

                                              Section Chair Address: Advocacy in Canadian Counselling Psychology

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Counselling Psychology

                                              Abstract: Advocacy has been described as an action taken on behalf of a person or a group in order to highlight their perspectives and/or support their needs (Pam, 2013). The desirable role of advocacy has been documented across multiple helping professions. Within counselling psychology, advocacy has largely centered on working in community settings to address systemic barriers (Ratts, Singh, Nassar-McMillan, Butler, and Rafferty McCullough, 2016). When it comes to Canadian counselling psychology, the role of advocacy has not been so avidly discussed or researched.
                                              In this Chair address, the topic of advocacy will be explored historically, conceptually, and practically. Moreover, advocacy will be examined as it relates to the needs of individuals, communities, and larger systems. This concept will be related back to the current state of counselling psychology in Canada, including the Section on Counselling Psychology. Furthermore, the aim of the upcoming 2018 Canadian Counselling Psychology Conference, which centers on the theme of advocacy, will be discussed.
                                              Advocacy strategies for increasing the visibility of Canadian counselling psychology across the country and internationally will be explored. That is, the manner in which Canadian counselling psychology is uniquely positioned to play an advocacy role for itself as a discipline as well as within the broader field of professional psychology will be discussed. Suggestions for broadening current conceptualizations and understandings of mental health and wellbeing will be made. 

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Calgary


                                              Nancy Arthur

                                              Nancy Arthur

                                              Keynote Address: Rethinking Social Justice and Counselling Psychology

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Counselling Psychology

                                              Abstract: Counselling psychology is fundamentally concerned with social justice through an emphasis on learning and development and helping people to overcome barriers related to their heath and well-being. Although many people experience social injustices, there is little agreement about the meaning of social justice for education, supervision, and other forms of practice in the field of counselling psychology. Additionally, in an era of funding restraints, the scope of practice for counselling psychologists is reduced through the mandates of many private and public organizations. What then, are the roles and responsibilities of counselling psychologists for engaging with social justice? Professional work is inevitably political and this presentation will invite discussion about ways to strengthen the connections between counselling psychology and social justice action.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Calgary


                                              CPA Section: Criminal Justice Psychology


                                              CPA Section: Developmental Psychology


                                              Nicole Sugden

                                              Nicole Sugden

                                              Title of Symposium: The role of experience in early learning: Lessons from language, face perception, emotion recognition, and neural plasticity.

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                                              Nominating Division/Section:

                                              Abstract: This talk will open the Developmental Section invited section's symposium on The Role of Experience in Early Learning. Experience helps us tune to our environment, allowing us to maximize our understanding of the relevant features of our world. It shapes our understanding, our abilities, and our perception. The impact of experience is particularly stark in infancy and early development. Those preferences and abilities then themselves shape future experience reciprocally. But what is our experience? What does the world look like from an infant's perspective? Recent research using head-mounted cameras high-lights how our experience in infancy is filled with faces and these faces appear in a way that likely supports learning - repeatedly, predictably, in multiple contexts, and soci0-communicatively engaging (smiling at) the baby. Although early face experience is consistent with infants' later preferences and abilities, only caregiver faces significantly predict these later capacities. This suggests that although it may take a village to raise a child, it may only take a single good face exemplar to attune early face perception.

                                              Bio: Nicole’s graduate research at Ryerson University took advantage of the fact that infants are especially interested in social, communicative signals like faces and voices. She examined infants’ natural and diverse daily face experience and how this experience shapes the development of their: (i) attention to faces, (ii) ability to tell the difference between faces, and (iii) brain responses to different types of faces. At the Infant Studies Centre, Nicole is using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to safely and non-invasively record infants’ brain activity to further explore how infants’ learning and brain development is influenced by their experience.

                                              Affiliation: University of British Columbia

                                              Presenter: Laurie Bayet (USA)

                                              Title: Early Development Of Emotional Faces: Perceptual And Cognitive Mechanisms Of Development And Relation To Social-Emotional Outcomes

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                                              Abstract: The development of facial emotion perception prefigures later social-emotional abilities; this early communication channel accompanies or even precedes language. Threat relevant expressions such as angry and fear faces in particular attract attention from an early age, promoting vicarious and direct learning from threat. In a first study, we use multivariate pattern analysis if infant looking time to demonstrate that 3.5-, 6-, and 12-month-old infants exhibit higher detection of fearful faces from noise, compared to smiling faces. Such readiness to detect fear from 3.5 months of age, earlier than previously thought, could enhance early experiences with this expression and lead to the development of an attention bias to fear. In a second study, we show that 3-year-olds recognize expressions of fear at lower rates than happiness or anger, but with identical perceptual thresholds. In other words, 3-year-olds have specific difficulty interpreting, but not detecting, the expression of fear; attention and perceptual biases to fear in infancy in implicit tasks do not translate into heightened explicit recognition of this expression in early childhood. The results contrast with findings in older children that demonstrated lower intensity thresholds for the recognition of smiling expressions. In a third study, we investigate whether individual differences in neural responses to threat relevant expressions (anger and fear) in infancy longitudinally predict internalizing symptoms in early childhood. In summary, we show that facial emotions differentially affect face detection in infancy, that differences in intensity thresholds in facial emotion recognition are not evident by 3-years of age, and that individual differences in neural responses to facial emotions in early development have implications for potential implications for the development of internalizing symptoms such as anxiety.

                                              Affiliation: Harvard University, USA

                                              Bio: Laurie Bayet is a postdoctoral research fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. She was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Rochester, and received a PhD from the University of Grenoble. Her research investigates how humans, as a group and as a collection of diverse individuals, learn to represent their social and perceptual environment in early development. Specifically, she uses behavioral and computational methods, in conjunction with neuroimaging techniques appropriate for developmental participants - such as electroencephalography (EEG) and at times functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), to examine the mechanisms by which individual human infants and children learn to represent the faces and emotional expressions of other people.


                                              Presenter: Fabrice Daimon (France)

                                              Title: Development Of Category Representation For Faces Differing By Age In Infancy

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                                              Abstract: Evidence suggests that both on-line learning taking place within the course of an experiment and real-life perceptual experience contribute to infant category representations (Quinn, 2011). Representation of face age may especially be affected by perceptual experience since infants are mostly exposed to adult faces (Rennels & Davis, 2008; Sugden et al., 2014). We examined the development of category formation for faces differing by age in 3- and 6-month-olds. Infants were familiarized with adult or infant faces, and then tested with a novel exemplar from the familiarized category paired with a novel exemplar from a novel category. Six-month-olds formed discrete categories of adult versus infant faces. A preference for infant faces after familiarization with adult faces was in evidence despite the spontaneous preference for adult faces (Heron-Delaney et al., 2017). At 3 months, there was no evidence that infants had formed separate categories of faces differing by age. We further examined category formation for faces differing by age in 9- and 12-month-olds. Both age groups formed discrete categories of adult and infant faces. The same task was then conducted with child versus infant faces. Whereas 9-month-olds preferred infant faces after familiarization with child faces, but not child faces after familiarization with infant faces, 12-month-olds formed discrete categories of child and infant faces. Moreover, more exposure to infant faces correlated with higher novel category preference scores when infants were familiarized with infant faces in 12-month-olds, but not 9-month-olds. Taken together with previous findings, the current pattern of results suggests that categorization of adult and infant faces is emerging around 6 months, following an initial visual bias for the most frequently encountered category of faces, i.e., adult faces. Categorization of child and infant faces, a more difficult contrast, is emerging around 12-month-olds, and is influenced by prior experience with infant faces.

                                              Affiliation: Centre des Sciences du Goût et de l'Alimentation, University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, INRA, CNRS. France

                                              Bio: 2017-2018: Postdoc at the Centre des Sciences du Goût et de l’Alimentation, Dijon, France (University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté / INRA / CNRS)Team: developmental ethology and cognitive psychology
                                              2015-2016: Teaching assistant at the University of Grenoble-Alpes, France
                                              2012-2015: Ph.D Thesis in Cognitive Psychology
                                              CNRS – Laboratoire de Psychologie et Neurocognition, Université Grenoble-Alpes


                                              Presenter: Nicholas Minar (USA)

                                              Title: Intersensory Integration in Typically Developing Infants and Infants At-Risk for ASD

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                                              Abstract: Talking faces are the most important multisensory objects in an infant’s world because they are crucial for both social exchange and for language development. Audio-visual synchrony cues are present in talking faces and infants become increasingly sensitive to concurrent visual lip movements and audible speech as they age. This audio-visual synchrony between lip movements and speech allows children to perceive faces and voices as a coherent whole rather than two disjointed events. Because children learn to integrate faces and voices prior to language production, it is believed that this ability acts as a precursor to language development. We investigated infants’ sensitivity to audio-visual synchrony prior to 24 months of age using social (talking faces) and non-social (bouncing balls) stimuli. Infants were classified as typically developing (TD) or at-risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results indicated that at-risk children were less sensitive to disruptions of audio-visual synchrony when viewing talking faces, but not bouncing balls. Furthermore, we examined the relation between sensitivity to audio-visual synchrony and subsequent language production approximately 8 months later. We found that greater sensitivity to audio-visual synchrony was related to better language production, in particular for face and voice integration. This was not the case for bouncing balls. These results indicate that it is not sensitivity to audio-visual synchrony relations per se that is related to language production, but rather sensitivity to synchrony relations between lip movements and audible speech that is important during the development of language skills.

                                              Affiliation: Rutgers University, USA

                                              Bio: Nick Minar graduated with his Ph.D. from Florida Atlantic University in 2015 where he studied infant perceptual development under David Lewkowicz. Since then, Nick has transitioned to a postdoctoral fellowship under Michael Lewis at the Institute for the Study of Child Development at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Nick has published research on infant synesthesia, the allocation of visual attention when viewing talking faces, the extraction of speech cues when exposed to native vs. non-native language, and the other-race effect. The focus of Nick’s talk will be intersensory integration in infants at-risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD).


                                              Presenter: Rebecca Reh (Canada)

                                              Title: Oscillatory Activity as a Signature of Neuronal Circuit Plasticity During Critical Periods of Development

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                                              Abstract: Oscillatory activity in the brain can be detected using electroencephalogram (EEG) recording, and may serve as a non-invasive biomarker of cortical plasticity throughout development. Network oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30-80 Hz) depend on inhibitory cells containing the Ca2+ binding protein Parvalbumin (PV). Age-related changes in gamma power synchronization reflect these cells postnatal development. During critical periods of development, the brain becomes highly sensitive to environmental changes. The staggered maturation of PV+ cells triggers these sequential windows of sensitivity. Gamma oscillations may serve as a useful marker of critical period status across different cortical regions. We describe a robust relationship between the ability to induce gamma activity and cortical plasticity in mouse visual cortex. During a brief period of postnatal development, the closure of one eye leads to an enduring reduction in cortical responsiveness to that eye. EEG recording over the visual cortex displays a striking, transient peak in narrow gamma power immediately following eye closure – only when the cortex is in a plastic state, either naturally in youth or by critical period reactivation later in life. Artificially inducing gamma power during deprivation restores plasticity even in fully adult mice, suggesting that gamma may play an active role in cortical rewiring. We are currently extending these studies to investigate whether gamma oscillatory activity provides a reliable indicator of the level of plasticity in the human infant cortex during critical periods of language development.

                                              Affiliation: University of British Columbia, Canada

                                              Bio: Rebecca Reh received her Ph. D. in Neuroscience from Harvard University in 2015, where she studied critical period plasticity in visual cortical circuits in the laboratory of Dr. Takao Hensch. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Infant Studies Centre at the University of British Columbia, under the supervision of Dr. Janet Werker, where she is using EEG recording in infants to investigate mechanisms of critical period regulation for langauge development.


                                              CPA Section: Educational and School Psychology


                                              Judith Wiener

                                              Judith Wiener

                                              Section Chair Address: School Psychology In The 21st Century: The Mutually Influencing Relationship Between Practice And Research

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Educational and School Psychology

                                              Abstract: As children spend 20 hours or more per week in school, the school context is a key milieu for enhancing mental health and wellbeing in addition to academic learning. School psychologists play a key role in fostering resilience, preventing learning and mental health problems, consulting with educators facing multiple student challenges, and providing school-based interventions. It is a truism that our assessments, consultations, and interventions should be informed by solid research that shows that our assessment tools are reliable and valid, and that demonstrates the efficaciousness of our interventions. In addition, I propose that strong research in our field that is likely to guide practice should be informed by the work of front-line school psychology practitioners. In this presentation, I provide illustrations of research that has its origins in practice, and research that dispels some of the myths held by some psychologists and educators. This includes research on the validity of parent-, self-, and teacher-report behaviour rating scales to assess ADHD and related disorders; IQ/Achievement discrepancy and psychological processing deficits in diagnosing learning disabilities; assessment of learning difficulties in immigrant and refugee students who do not speak the societal language at home; the efficacy of social-emotional learning; and the characteristics of effective psychological reports. Unfortunately, there is a temptation for researchers to conduct studies that have little impact and for practitioners to embrace the latest pseudo-sciences and fads espoused by educators. I therefore conclude with a discussion of the need for merging the researcher, professional supervisor, and practitioner roles.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: OISE/University of Toronto


                                              Jonathan Weiss

                                              Jonathan Weiss

                                              Keynote Section Chair Address: Helping Students With Autism Thrive: Combining Psychosocial Interventions Within A Framework Of Positive Youth Development

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Educational and School Psychology

                                              Abstract: Individuals with autism often struggle with managing anxiety, anger, or depression, and increasingly, interventions are being used to help address these difficulties. An emerging literature now exists in the use of psychosocial interventions to address emotional problems within the schools, though far more exists of their provision in the community. These treatments are best provided within a context of promoting thriving and positive growth more generally in people on the spectrum, including the need to focus on indicators such as happiness, satisfaction and resilience. A balanced approach to incorporating these concepts within schools is critical for long-term mental health care in the educational context. The current lecture will review the theme of thriving in children with autism, will provide examples of cases where this is already occurring, and how evidence-based interventions fit within this model. It will address issues pertaining to individual-contextual alignment for children with autism, and who can be involved in mental health care.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Psychology Department, Faculty of Health, York University


                                              CPA Section: Environmental Psychology


                                              CPA Section: Extremism and Terrorism


                                              CPA Section: Family Psychology


                                              Marlene Moretti

                                              Marlene Moretti

                                              Keynote Address: From Research to Practice: Attachment, Trauma and Intervention

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Family Psychology

                                              Abstract: The fundamental importance of attachment security in promoting mental health and wellbeing across the lifespan is clear. Exposure of children and teens to maltreatment and adversity not only increases risk for serious mental and physical health problems but also disrupts attachment security and derails how children express their needs to caregivers. When caregivers are unaware or unable to understand the attachment needs underlying these atypical behaviors they may respond in ways that further deepen and concretize insecurity in the children they care for. The key caregiving features that promote attachment security and the pathways from attachment security to resilience in childhood and adolescence are discussed in this presentation, with a particular emphasis understanding the transition of adolescence. Over the past decade remarkable progress has been made in the translation of attachment research into evidence based interventions to support caregivers and promote child and adolescent health. We will discuss the key features that define attachment-based intervention, the development, focus and evidence of existing treatments, including interventions designed to address the impact of trauma and promote healthy development in children and teens in foster care. Designing interventions that are scalable, sustainable and effective is critical to promoting child and adolescent health.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Simon Fraser University


                                              CPA Section: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine


                                              Pierre Rainville

                                              Pierre Rainville

                                              Keynote Section Chair Address: Pavlov meets the Zen brain: Neuropsychological mechanisms of clinician empathy and mindfulness interventions for pain management

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine

                                              Abstract: Please join us for the Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine's invited speaker symposium featuring Dr. Pierre Rainville of the University of Montreal and Dr. Philip Jackson of the University of Laval. Dr. Rainville will present his work on the neuropsychological basis of pain and fear, and how mindfulness and hypnosis interventions can help improve pain management. Dr. Jackson will present on the neuropsychological bases of clinician empathy and how cerebral responses during exposure to patients' pain experiences may influence the quality and effectiveness of pain management interventions.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Universite de Montreal


                                              CPA Section: History and Philosophy Section


                                              Douglas Myers

                                              Douglas Myers

                                              Keynote Section Chair Address: The Canadian Psychologist who Taught the R.A.F. to Fly: Roger Myers in London, 1941-44

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                                              Sponsoring Section: History and Philosophy Section

                                              Abstract: C. Roger Myers (1906-1985) was a pioneer in applied psychology in Canada. He was a founding member of the Canadian Psychological Association, serving as President in 1949 and later as its first Executive Director in the 1970s. As Chair of the Department of Psychology, University of Toronto (1956-1968), he shepherded the development of a strong research intensive department. While serving as an advisor to the Royal Air Force in London during WWII, he wrote hundreds of letters home. We, his two children, have preserved his letters home and recently have published a book of selected letters. This presentation will provide the background and circumstances of the appointment of C. Roger Myers and Edward “Ned” Bott, two University of Toronto psychologists, to the Royal Air Force as advisors on pilot/aircrew selection and training during WWII. Based on Myer’s letters home, his post-war interview transcripts and a range of R.A.F. materials, the nature of the work he did in developing more effective approaches, as well as the traditionalist resistance those efforts encountered, will be highlighted, as will his keen and entertaining observations of daily life in wartime Britain. Material on Roger’s wife, Helen, coping unexpectedly – as so many wartime women did – with kids and day-to-day life as a single parent will also be provided.

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                                              CPA Section: Industrial / Organizational Psychology


                                              Ramona Bobocel

                                              Ramona Bobocel

                                              Section Chair Address: Forgiveness in the Workplace

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Industrial / Organizational Psychology

                                              Abstract: Interpersonal forgiveness has long been associated with a number of benefits for victims of transgressions—such as greater mental health and well-being—as well as for victim-offender relationships. The established benefits of forgiveness in the context of close relationships have motivated scholars to extend the study of forgiveness to the workplace. In this talk, I will review research from my laboratory in which we have examined motivational and cognitive mechanisms as well as contextual factors that promote forgiveness in the workplace. I will also discuss more recent research in which we and others have begun to examine nuances of forgiveness, including when and why it may result in intrapersonal and interpersonal costs. Altogether, our research reinforces the idea that, just as in close relationships, forgiveness in the workplace is a complex phenomenon, one that is best conceptualized both as an outcome and as the beginning of a process.

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                                              Affiliation: University of Waterloo


                                              Gary P. Latham

                                              Gary P. Latham

                                              Title of Symposium: Mental Health in the Workplace

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Industrial / Organizational Psychology

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                                              Affiliation: University of Toronto


                                              Sarah Bourdeau

                                              Sarah Bourdeau

                                              Title of Symposium: CSIOP Student Symposium: New Perspectives in Industrial and Organizational Psychology Research

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                                              Abstract: Research in industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology is blooming. With a predominant scientist-practitioner model, most I/O research is concerned with the production of knowledge that matters for people in the workplace. Such research is important, as it offers concrete insights for the workforce. This symposium highlights the work from five I/O Canadian students that share the goal of connecting science to practice. The first paper used Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count to create a new implicit leadership theories (ILT) dictionary. This new valid qualitative measure offers a new tool providing a more comprehensive understanding of people's ILTs. The second paper investigated the experiences associated with mental health disclosure in the workplace. Using grounded theory analysis, this paper helps understand factors influencing perceptions of disclosure in the workplace, which can help organizations implement programs that facilitate this process. The third paper investigated the enabling and controlling nature of work-life policies. This new perspective can help organization implement more effective work-life flexibility programs. The fourth paper presents a new theoretical perspective of third-party's reaction to incivility. This novel theoretical analysis offers insights for interventions that aim at reducing workplace incivility. Finally, the last paper used an experimental design to investigate how mindset influences employee's judgments about their supervisor's unfair behaviors. These results show the importance of how organization talk about supervisor misconduct. This symposium will provide a multi-method understanding of multiple areas of I/O psychology, offering a more in-depth and comprehensive understanding of issues relevant to the workplace.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Universite du Quebec a Montreal


                                              CPA Section: International and Cross-Cultural Psychology


                                              CPA Section: Psychologists in Hospitals and Health Centers


                                              CPA Section: Psychology in the Military


                                              CPA Section: Psychologists and Retirement


                                              Joseph Snyder

                                              Joseph Snyder

                                              Title of Symposium: Meeting The Needs Of Those Psychologists Who Have Retired, Are Planning To Retire, Or Have Had Retirement thrust upon them, Part II

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Psychologists and Retirement

                                              Abstract: Mission Statement of one of the recently formed CPA sections: The Section of Psychologists and Retirement [SPAR] will provide a forum for psychologists who are currently retired from their professional employment in the field of psychology and/ or those who are interested in the area of retirement as a life stage, to discuss the impact of retirement on post-work quality of life and the opportunities it affords those who are open to change. Towards that end, the Section will: … and so it goes for 8 separate points. The aim of this conversation session cum Town Hall meeting (note the expanded scope of this session to become a Town Hall meeting in addition to a Section Annual business meeting) is to continue with an evaluation of those points mentioned above in an interactive informal session with current members of the section and the curious -- retired or about to be retired. Are there other aspects to consider, other organizations to provide support in collaboration with SPAR, or do we need to experience some cognitive restructuring leading to an epiphany that maybe it's time to retire and it's not too terrible!

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                                              Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Concordia University

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                                              CPA Section: Psychopharmacology


                                              CPA Section: Quantitative Electrophysiology


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                                              Presenter TBA

                                              Title of Symposium: Understanding and Impacting the Brain through the Use of Electroencephalography and Neurotherapy Treatment(s)

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Quantitative Electrophysiology

                                              Abstract: This symposium will provide both newcomers and seasoned neurotherapy practitioners with an understanding of the broad and exciting areas of research within the field of neurotherapy/quantitative electrophysiology. It will also discuss the resulting clinical applications of this research, particularly in regards to the treatment of PTSD, traumatic brain injury, and ADHD.

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                                              CPA Section: Quantitative Methods


                                              CPA Section: Rural and Northern Psychology


                                              AnnaMarie Carlson

                                              AnnaMarie Carlson

                                              Keynote Section Chair Address: Integrating Health Psychology into Rural Practice

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Rural and Northern Psychology

                                              Abstract: There is an established link between mental and physical health, with psychological treatment aiding in recovery and management of health conditions. Research suggests that individuals in rural areas do not access specialty care as often as their urban counterparts. Rural psychologists may be hesitant to specialize the service they provide, whereas urban psychologists tend to provide specialized services. This address will provide description of a rural-based generalized health psychology service embedded within a secondary health care setting considering issues relevant to rural service and a health psychology practice. Strategies around reducing stigma, technology utilization, engaging stakeholders, consultation, as well as providing integrated multi-disciplinary health care will be provided within this description. Ethical issues and maintaining professional boundaries within a rural health care facility will be discussed and complimented with case examples. A summary of factors that make this service successful and suggestions for improvement will be provided. Finally, a summary of ways to transition generalist psychologist skills into health psychology will be discussed.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: University of Manitoba


                                              Jeff Ansloos Section Invited Keynote/Featured Speaker Address

                                               


                                              CPA Section: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity


                                              Karen Blair

                                              Karen Blair

                                              Section Chair Address: When Everything is Your Topic: A Peek into a Program of Research Focused on LGBTQ2S+ Psychology

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

                                              Abstract: When LGBTQ2S+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Two Spirit) Psychology is your area of interest, it can sometimes be difficult to succinctly position your program of research within the more traditional facets of psychology. By its very nature, LGBTQ2S+ Psychology is interdisplinary and can include any topic related to the lives and experiences of LGBTQ2S+ individuals. Consequently, the field pulls on all of the existing areas of psychology, including social, health, clinical, and developmental - to name only a few. Within the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Section of the Canadian Psychological Association we have attempted to address this issue by encouraging our members to submit their work to OTHER sections of CPA, in order to increase the reach of LGBTQ2S+ psychology across the diverse sub-fields within the discpline. Focusing on examples from my own program of research which has spanned nearly 15 years, I will highlight the diversity that can exist within a single program of LGBTQ2S+ research, while also touching on the importance (and ease) of incporating LGBTQ2S+ inclusive research methods into any area of psychological inquiry. Topics will include relationships, social support, health, sexual pain, femininity, gender identity, attitudes and prejudice, victimization, resiliency and identity development. The talk will be of interest to anyone interested in learning more about LGBTQ2S+ Psychology and/or the use of LGBTQ2S+ inclusive research methods. The talk will conclude by looking to the future of LGBTQ2S+ Psychology and addressing how the field should move forward!

                                              Bio:

                                              Karen Blair is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia;  an Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia; and Chair of the Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity Issues (SOGII) Section of the Canadian Psychological Association. To learn more about Dr. Blair's current research interests, please click here.

                                              Affiliation: St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia


                                              Carmen Poulin

                                              Carmen Poulin and Lynne Gouliquer

                                              Keynote Address: Making A Difference with Social Science Data: The Research Behind the Canadian Government's 2017 Apology to LGBTQI2+ Canadians in the Military, RCMP and Public Service.

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

                                              Abstract: Over the last 3 to 4 years, we have been working with a Canadian network of researchers, activists, and former military members (We Demand an Apology Network) in an attempt to pressure the Federal Government to apologize for the discriminatory treatment it inflicted on LGBTQI2+ individuals in the military, RCMP, and public service. Our research on "The impact of the Canadian Forces policies on homosexual members and their partners" formed the basis for much of the evidence that was submitted to the Government to convince it to come forward with an apology. Our findings documented the impact of the Canadian Forces Administrative Order 19-20 (CFAO 19-20), which rendered homosexuality incompatible with serving in the Canadian military. Despite the decriminalisation of homosexuality in 1969 in Canadian civil society, under CFAO 19-20, the military conducted over 22 years of widespread witch hunts to identify "suspected" and "self-admitted" "homosexuals" and to terminate their careers. To do so, the military utilised various approaches such as spying, interrogating, tracking, stalking, and wire-tapping (Gouliquer, 2000; Poulin, 2001; Poulin, Gouliquer, and Moore, 2009). Our findings revealed how devastating the effects of CFAO19-20 were for LGBTQI2+ soldiers, ranging from living with constant fear, being traumatised for life, losing their livelihood, suffering from mental health difficulties, and even committing suicide. The impact of this work is far reaching but not in the usual way. We will share our adventure of learning new ways of knowledge mobilisation and revisit old ones.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: Carmen Poulin - University of New Brunswick
                                              Lynne Gouliquer - Laurentian University


                                              CPA Section: Social and Personality


                                              CPA Section: Sport and Exercise Psychology


                                              Pier-Éric Chamberland

                                              Pier-Éric Chamberland

                                              Keynote Section Chair Address: How Fragmented Is Sport Psychology in Canada, and Where Do We Go From Here?

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                                              CPA Section: Students


                                              Richard Koestner

                                              Richard Koestner

                                              Keynote Address: The Motivation Equation: How Goals Can Be Used to Motivate Ourselves (and Sometimes Others)

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Students

                                              Abstract: The Canadian Psychological Association’s (CPA) Section for Students in Psychology is pleased to welcome Dr. Richard Koestner as our Keynote Speaker for the 29th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Dr. Koestner is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at McGill University, where he has conducted research on human motivation for over 30 years. Dr. Koestner received the 2007 CPA Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology. He also won the 2008 Principal’s Prize for Excellence in Teaching from McGill University. He has published over 150 scientific articles and his recent work focuses on how to effectively select, pursue, and (sometimes) disengage from personal goals. In this Keynote Address, Dr. Koestner will explore factors that interfere with our capacity to successfully attain personal goals. After outlining common errors made in goal-setting, he will describe recent research that suggests there are three little-known secrets to setting personal goals. This Keynote Address is designed to provide practical information for use in one’s personal and professional life.

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                                              Affiliation: McGill University


                                              CPA Section: Teaching of Psychology


                                              CPA Section: Traumatic Stress


                                              Alain Brunet

                                              Alain Brunet

                                              Keynote Address: Paris MEM: Mitigating the impact of a terrorist attack on a city wide scale

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Traumatic Stress

                                              Abstract: This CPA Traumatic Stress Section Chair address will describe Paris MEM, an ambitious Canadian-led project set up in the aftermath of the parisian terrorist attacks of 2015 as a means to enhance the treatment capacities of the parisian AP-HP hospital network. Paris MEM consisted in training more than 160 clinicians in 20 different center to administer an easy to learn and efficient therapeutic intervention: reconsolidation impairment therapy. Reconsolidation impairment consist in recalling a traumatic event via a standardized procedure under the influence of the recosnolidation blocker propanolol. The project rationale, goals and some preliminary data (n = 200) will be presented. The efficiency of the intervention compared to treatment as usual will be discussed as well as the scalability of Paris MEM to other trauma-stricken parts of the world.

                                              Bio:

                                              Affiliation: McGill University


                                              Bruno Millet

                                              Bruno Millet

                                              Keynote Address: Intervening in the Aftermath of the Terrorist Attacks in France : What have we learned

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Traumatic Stress

                                              Abstract: The terrorist attacks that struck France in 2015-16 are the most devastating events to hit France since WWII. Prof. Bruno Millet, a French Psychiatrist who personally witnessed the impact of the attacks, will provide a description of the actions that were taken by the French authorities, the APHP hospital network, the first responders as well as the mental health professionals to intervene and mitigate the short and long term physical and mental health impact of these attacks. Lessons learned for the future will be outlined.

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                                              Affiliation: Université de Rennes, France


                                              CPA Section: Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP)


                                              ColleenMacQuarrie

                                              Colleen MacQuarrie

                                              Section Chair Address: Critical, Radical, and Relevant: Academic Activism as a Feminist Process to Decolonize Psychology

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP)

                                              Abstract: The praxis of feminist liberation psychology offers a framework for decolonizing the discipline of psychology through  collaborative practices situated within the contexts in which people live and work. Through examples of reproductive justice research and advocacy and collaborative wellness projects with Mi’kmaq communities in the Atlantic region of Canada, I illustrate how collaborative action research centers the lived experiences of people who are often excluded, avoided, or ignored. In this radical shift toward critical and reflexive research with people in their communities, the collaborative methodologies act as radical de-colonizing forces that shift the knowledge and action possibilities within communities. The role of the psychologist in animating community empowerment processes is illustrated as a critical moment for decolonization.

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                                              Affiliation: University of Prince Edward Island


                                              Karen Korabik

                                              Karen Korabik

                                              Keynote Address: Reflections on Gender and Leadership

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                                              Sponsoring Section: Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP)

                                              Abstract: In this presentation, I will summarize the results of the research on gender and leadership that I have carried out over the past forty years. I will reflect upon the changes that have taken place in my thinking about gender and how I have grappled with trying to understand its complexity. I will speak to the importance of theory in doing gender research and explain how my theories about the impact of gender on leadership have evolved over time. I will also discuss some of the guiding principles that have underpinned the decisions and choices that I have made during my career as a feminist psychologist and reflect on the impact that they have had on where I am today.

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                                              Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Guelph


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                                              Title of Symposium: Embodiment and Social Justice: From Interrogating Embodied Distress in Inequality to Activism and Social Transformations

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                                              Nominating Division/Section: Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP)

                                              Abstract: This symposium is unique in bringing together researchers from India and Canada to address an important, yet understudied, topic in psychology, namely: embodiment and social justice. Enriched by knowledge that emerged among individuals exposed to different social systems of privilege and to the adverse impact of the internalization of such adverse ideologies, the symposium also addresses paths for activism and social change. The first presenter will address the ideology of valuing of fair skin in India and its shaping of individuals' decisions about applying unhealthy fairness products. The second presenter will examine the prevalent sexualized objectification of girls and women in the US/UK and its oppressive impact on their potential engagement in activism. The third presenter will address social barriers in the life of older women in Canada and their re-establishment of a sense of place in the world through collective resistance to internalized oppression and engagement in liberating processes. The fourth presenter will address the stigma of weightism at all levels of the social environment, necessitating a concerted effort of tackling co-occurring prejudicial systems towards weight-based social justice. The fifth presenter will describe the intersection of different dimensions of privilege and disenfranchisement as revealed through Canadian girls' drawings of 'ideal girls' - suggesting the need to transform such intersection through society-wide interventions, as well as consciousness-raising interventions in schools. The symposium highlights the inextricable connection between varied social structures of power and individuals' experiences of embodiment, and the opportunities to interrogate such systems of privilege towards social transformations.

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