Invited Congress Speakers

SYMPOSIA


Yiqun Gan

Yiqun Gan

Focus of Lecture: Coping with Stress and Adversity Using Positive Psychological Resources: Effects of Resilience, Future Orientation, and Social Support

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Nominating Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: Psychological resources—goals, resilience, future orientation, and social-support—buffer the deleterious effects of stress and are predictors of psychological health-related outcomes. In this symposium, we aim to broaden our understanding of the effects of psychological resources in terms of five aspects: Sonia Lippke will address the role of goals in health-related behavioral change and social participation, Nancy Yu will discuss the function of resilience and vulnerability among bereaved spouses, Brian Hall will examine the protective role of social support in the association between lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD symptom severity, Lei Zheng will report the inoculative role of future orientation to regulate future emotions in Trier social stress test, Yiqun Gan will elaborate on the genetic bases of future orientation and resilience, and Ralf Schwarzer will be the discussant of this symposium. Epidemiological, longitudinal, experimental, and candidate gene approaches will be adopted to explore these issues using self-report, behavioral, and physiological measures, which represent the interdisciplinary and most up-to-date research topics and approaches in the field.

Bio: Yiqun Gan is a professor at School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Peking University, China. She received her Ph.D. from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 1998. She has published over 90 research papers as the first or corresponding author, and her papers are published in top international journals such as Journal of Personality and Health Psychology. She has been the principle investigator of a number of research projects funded by the National Science Foundation of China. She was invited to present as a Transversal Keynote Speaker at the International Congress of Applied Psychology in 2014, and to convene an Invited Symposium at the International Congress of Psychology in 2012. She currently serves as an associate editor in Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology, as well as an editorial board member of Applied Psychology: Health and Well-being, and Stress and Health. Her research on future orientation and resilience has embraced numerous state-of-the-art techniques such as laboratory experiments, molecular genetics, physiological indexes, eye tracking, and ERP. She has been awarded the title of “Recognized Psychologist” by the Chinese Psychological Society in 2016.

Affiliation: Peking University, Beijing

Presenter: Sonia Lippke, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany

Title: Supporting Psychological Resources Of Older Individuals With IT-Assisted Interventions: The Role Of Future Orientation And Planning In Health Behavioral Change - Stage-Specific Effectiveness Tested In A Randomized Controlled Trial

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Abstract: ackground: The psychological resources and physical activity (PA) can be facilitated by means of an IT-assisted intervention. While previous studies demonstrated the effectiveness of such interventions for increasing PA in older adults, evidence on the effects on future orientation in terms of subjective age is limited. Thus, we reviewed the literature and evaluated the effects of an IT-assisted PA intervention of people aged 65-75 years.
Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 166 individuals were assigned to one of three groups: (a) Intervention Group 1 (IG1) where participants were asked to track PA in an online-activity-log over the course of ten weeks; (b) Intervention Group 2 (IG2; IG1 plus the use of FitBit); or (c) a waitlisted control group which received access to the intervention of IG1 after the completion of the follow-up (WLCG). Assessments of stage, calendar and subjective age, as well as socio-demographic variables, were conducted at baseline and repeated after 12 weeks. In total, 97 individuals participated in the follow-up.
Results: All groups improved over time regarding their stage with 38.5% of individuals in the WLCG, 43.2% in the IG1, and 57.1% in the IG2 adopted PA. While descriptively the intervention was helpful, these effects were not statistically significant. However, when controlling for baseline behavior, differences between IG1/IG2 and WLCG were significant (Chi²(2)=16.116; p<.01). Age related effects showed that older individuals benefitted more from the intervention (F=10.51; p<.01).
Action/impact: Supporting behavior change by means of IT-based-interventions can help older adults adopt and maintain PA. Age-related effects should be evaluated more often. Supporting psychological resources future orientation and planning in health behavioral change is important, and with that to cope with stress and adversity especially with increasing age.

Bio: Researcher unique identifiers: orcid.org/0000-0002-8272-0399
ResearcherID B-7564-2014 researchgate.net/profile/Sonia_Lippke
• EDUCATION:
2004 PhD; Department of Psychology; Health Psychology Unit, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany; Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Ralf Schwarzer
2000 Dipl.-Psych. (Master equivalent); Department of Psychology; Health Psychology Unit, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany
• CURRENT POSITIONS:
Since 2016 Full Professor of Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine; Jacobs University Bremen/Germany
Since 2011 Faculty Member; Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS), Bremen/Germany
• PREVIOUS POSITIONS:
2011-2016 Associate Professor of Health Psychology; Jacobs University Bremen/Germany
2010–2011 Associate Professor (UHD); Maastricht University/Netherlands
2004–2010 Assistant professor (C1); Freie Universität Berlin/Germany
2004–2005 Postdoctoral fellow and Postdoctoral research associate; Centre for Health Promotion Studies, University of Alberta/Canada
• CURRENT INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES (selected):
7/2014–today President elect of Div. 8: Health Psychology/Int. Association of Applied Psychology
10/2013–today Elected Faculty Speaker, Jacobs University/Germany
• COMMISSIONS OF TRUST (selected):
2015–today Associate Editor, Applied Psychology: Health and Wellbeing/Germany
2013–today Editorial Board, Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal/Germany
2012–today Review Board, American Journal of Health Behavior/USA


Presenter: Nancy Xiaonan Yu, City University of Hong Kong

Title: Personal and partner resilience moderated the association between sense of community and life satisfaction among Chinese elderlies

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Abstract: From an ecological perspective, the purpose of this study was to examine the moderation effect of personal resilience and partner resilience on the relationship between a sense of community and life satisfaction among Chinese older adults. Utilizing a cross-sectional design, 258 Chinese couples (aged between 60 and 97 years) completed sense of community, resilience, and life satisfaction measures. The results showed that (a) after controlling for personal resilience, partner resilience, and other covariates, sense of community was positively associated with life satisfaction, and (b) a three-way interaction between sense of community, personal resilience, and partner resilience predicted life satisfaction. Precisely, under the low personal resilience-low partner resilience condition, the effect of sense of community on life satisfaction was weaker than it was under other conditions. To enhance life satisfaction of Chinese older adults, tailored interventions to improve community resources, personal resilience, and couples’ strengths are recommended.

Bio: Dr Nancy Xiaonan Yu is an assistant professor in City University of Hong Kong. Her research program has focused on resilience in adversities. Dr Yu has been investigating the protective effects of resilience in vulnerable populations such as immigrants. In addition, she has applied the community-based participatory research approach to develop and implement culturally sensitive interventions to promote resilience in populations that are experiencing stress.


Presenter: Brian Hall, University of Macau and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Title: TBC

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Abstract:

Bio: Prof. Hall is a licensed clinical psychologist and epidemiologist. His specialty area is Global Health and the sub-field of Global Mental Health. His primary goal is to engage in research to improve the public's health. He accomplishes this utilizing mixed methods research (integrating qualitative and quantitative methodologies). Prof. Hall is particularly interested in understanding the social determinants of population health, the consequences of adversity and traumatic stress, and developing and evaluating scalable intervention programs for marginalized populations. Currently his research program is focused on improving the health of local Macau Chinese people, migrants (Chinese, Southeast Asian), and conducting psychiatric epidemiologic studies across the Pearl River Delta region of China, and Asia. Prof. Hall serves or has served as a consultant for the World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF, UNAIDS, and local government offices and NGOs in China.
Prof. Hall is an Associate Editor for the journal Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, and serves on the Editorial Boards of Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, the Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Psychological Trauma: Theory Research Practice and Policy, and, the European Journal of Psychotraumatology.


Presenter: Lei Zheng, Peking University, Beijing

Title: Future Orientation As An Inoculation To Regulate Future Emotion in Trier Social Stress Test

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Abstract: Future orientation is a goal-related construct which is characteristic of thinking about and acting toward future events and outcomes. The present study aimed to investigate the emotion regulating role of future orientation in a goal-related stressful situation. In total, 80 participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. The experiment group was primed by future orientation, whereas the control group was primed a neutral condition. Next, both groups were subjected to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). The results demonstrated that the future oriented participants exhibited less negative moods (anxiety, depression), and more positive moods after TSST task. Meanwhile, the future oriented participants showed less increase in heart rate and saliva cortisol level during the stress task, compared to the control group. In conclusion, future orientation can be a mental inoculation to increase adaptive function for coping with future stress.

Bio: Lei Zheng is a Ph.D. candidate at school of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences of Peking University, China. He work on several projects related to coping with adversity. He is especially interested in understanding future oriented coping process.


Presenter: Yiqun Gan, Peking University, Beijing

Title: A COMT × Environment Interaction Predicts Future Orientation and Resilience: The Differential Post-Stress Growth Hypothesis

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Abstract: Background: Interest in the effect of gene and environment interaction on positive mental resources is increasing. Purpose: We examined the interactions of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and stress (early stressful life events, experimental prime, and trauma exposure) on future orientation and resilience. Methods: In Study 1, 562 Chinese university students (Sample 1) and 454 Chinese company employees (Sample 2) self-reported early stressful life events and completed a measure on future orientation. Study 2 included 154 university students, and involved manipulated control-deprivation. In Study 3, 1,140 earthquake survivors self-reported trauma exposure during the Sichuan earthquake and completed a measure on resilience. Results: Consistently, the Met/Met genotype was associated with higher levels of future orientation or resilience under more adverse conditions. Conclusions: Based on the consistent findings in these three studies, we proposed a “differential post-stress growth hypothesis,” which may serve as genetic evidence for the adversity quotient.

Bio: Yiqun Gan is a professor at School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Peking University, China. She has received her Ph.D. in the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 1998. She has published over 90 research papers as the first or the corresponding author, and her findings were published in top international journals such as “Journal of Personality” and “Health Psychology”. She has been the principle investigator of a number of research projects funded by the National Science Foundation of China. She was invited to a present as a Transversal Keynote Speaker at the International Congress of Applied Psychology in 2014, and to convene an Invited Symposium at the International Congress of Psychology in 2012. She currently serves as an Associate Editor in two SCI/SSCI indexed journals “European Journal of Cancer Care” and “Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology”, as well as an editorial board member of “Applied Psychology: Health and Well-being” and “Stress and Health”. Her research on future orientation and resilience has embraced numerous state-of-the-art techniques such as laboratory experiments, molecular genetics, physiological indexes, eye tracking, and ERP. She has won the title of “Recognized Psychologist” by the Chinese Psychological Society in 2016.


Esther Geva

Esther Geva

Focus of Lecture: International Perspectives on Language and Literacy Development of Struggling Readers: From Research to Practice

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Nominating Division/Section: Education and School Psychology Section

Symposium Summary: This symposium brings together an international group of researchers whose work focuses on struggling readers in diverse geographical and educational contexts. Relevant to researchers and school psychologists alike, the issues addressed include: What are the sources of word reading and reading comprehension difficulties? Are these difficulties language/orthography specific? Can one distinguish difficulties associated with deprivation or lack of proficiency in the L2 from difficulties associated with a learning disability (LD)? Can one reliably identify LD in the L2? How early can these difficulties be identified and treated? Can we identify principles of early assessment, prevention, and intervention that are generalizable across contexts and orthographies? Shany’s work with Hebrew speakers shows that poor comprehenders with poor accuracy or poor fluency differ significantly in their reading comprehension profiles. In her work in rural Colombia Ramirez demonstrates that not all spelling errors are made equal, and that the nature of Spanish spelling errors is different for disadvantaged and dyslexic children. Genesee et al demonstrate how early performance in English (the L1) can predict subsequent difficulties in French (L2) of children attending French Immersion programs in Canada. Relatedly, in her work with immigrant children to Canada (ELLs), Geva and colleagues show that already in grade 2, distinct combinations of cognitive, linguistic and basic reading profiles of ELLs foretell grade 4 sub-group membership. Finally, in work initiated in Finland and implemented in other countries Lyytinen will discuss the efficacy of computerized, carefully calibrated, dynamic assessment tools for early identification and intervention across countries and languages.

Bio: Esther Geva studied in Israel, the US, and Canada. She is a Full Professor in the department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, OISE/University of Toronto, and a licensed psychologist. Esther’s work straddles the broad areas of educational psychology, cross-cultural psychology, and bilingualism. Her research, publications, graduate teaching and supervision relate to: (1) how language and literacy skills develop in children, adolescents and young adults learning to read in a second language (L2); (2) the nature of the relationships between oral language skills and the development of reading and writing skills in L2 learners; (3) transfer issues in L2 literacy development; (4) the contribution of cognitive, linguistic, and background factors to literacy development of typical and atypical L2 learners, (5) approaches to effective intervention with at-risk and vulnerable learners; and (6) cross-cultural psychology pertaining to the well-being of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners. Esther published numerous chapters and articles in these areas, has presented her work internationally, and served on various advisory, policy, and review committees in the US and Canada, concerned with CLD, including the National Literacy Panel (NLP). Esther, a Canadian Council on Learning Minerva Scholar, is committed to knowledge mobilization. A book that she co-authored with her colleague, Judy Wiener, Psychological Assessment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children was published by Springer in 2015. Another book, co-written with a former student and now a colleague, Gloria Ramirez (2015), Key Concepts for the Language Classroom: Focus on Reading was published in 2015 by Oxford University Press.

Affiliation: Professor, School and Clinical Child Psychology
Department of Applied Psychology & Human Development
OISE/University of Toronto

Presenter: Michal Shany, Department of Learning Disabilities and Edmund J. Safra Research Center in Learning Disabilities, The University of Haifa, Israel

Title: Heterogeneity in the sources of reading difficulty is related to differential profiles of reading comprehension: Implications for assessment and intervention

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Abstract: This study examines how heterogeneity in reading difficulty is related to differential profiles of reading comprehension. The first step in the research was to establish the viability of an accuracy/rate-based typology for the identification of subtypes of dyslexia in the Hebrew orthography. Both subtypes were found to be equally prevalent in a national representative sample, each with selective impairment on only one dimension (i.e., accuracy or rate) in the presence of normal levels of performance on the other dimension, and each accounting for about 10% of the general population. We then developed a model explaining reading comprehension that considers the Simple View of Reading (SVR), as well as metacognition, emotion, and type of question (simple versus complex inferences). The performance of 800 children in grades 4-5 on a comprehension measure based on the above model was investigated, and from this sample, children with specific deficits in word reading accuracy or rate were selected. The accuracy and fluency of the poor comprehender groups differed significantly in their reading comprehension profiles, including the metacognition, emotion and question type components. Finally, we will suggest that this assessment approach yields different comprehension profiles and that these two subtypes call for different instructional interventions.

Bio:


Presenter: Gloria Ramirez, Associate Professor, Faculty of Education and Social Work, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC

Title: Spelling Profiles of Spanish-Speaking Children from Disadvantaged Socio-Economic Backgrounds

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Abstract: Poor spelling is one of the hallmarks of dyslexia; however, low literacy levels and poor orthographic knowledge are not necessarily the result of a learning difficulty (LD). Reasons behind some children’s low literacy levels are poor teaching and lack of exposure to written text. It is important to distinguish between the pattern of errors that signal an LD and those that reflect insufficient familiarity and exposure to the orthographic system. To identify typical and atypical spelling mistakes, the current study examined writing samples of 30 3rd to 5th grade children coming from rural schools in Colombia, consistently performing below expectations on Colombian national examinations. Some of these children were identified as having literacy based LD, according to their performance on word and pseudoword reading tasks (< 25th percentile). Error analyses were undertaken to characterize patterns of errors differentiating children with and without a LD. It was found that orthographic errors were more recurrent in children with a LD than in children with low literacy levels but without a LD. Spelling errors for phonemes represented by more than one grapheme and errors denoting immature knowledge of Spanish orthographic rules were common to both groups of children. However, reversals and transpositions were unique for children with a LD. Moreover, most errors made by children without LD did not interfere with meaning; Conversely, most errors made by children with LD distorted meaning. Implications for the assessment of Spanish-speaking students with low-literacy levels, coming from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds will be discussed.

Bio:


Presenters: Fred Genesee, Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Caroline Erdos, Speech-Language Pathology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Robert Savage, Associate Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University Faculty of Education, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Corinne Haigh, Associate Professor, The School of Education, Bishop’s University, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada

Title: Predicting Risk for Language and Reading Difficulties in Early French Immersion Programs

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Abstract: Identification of students in early immersion programs, or other programs in which students are educated in a second language (L2), who are likely to experience reading and language learning difficulties is problematic since students are still acquiring the language of instruction. Thus, assessments in L2 are not likely to yield valid indicators of risk for difficulty; this in turn can delay early intervention and jeopardize students’ long term outcomes. The present research builds on research that has found significant positive correlations between students’ first language (L1) and L2 skills in domains related to literacy and academic language. It was reasoned that identification of risk using students’ L1 would allow early identification of risk and early intervention in the L2 and, thus, improve students’ long term outcomes. A group of Kindergarten English-speaking students were administered a battery of tests that have been found to predict difficulty in language and reading development in English-L1 speakers. Students received all instruction in Kindergarten to Grade 2 in French-L2. They were subsequently administered a battery of reading and language tests in Grade 3 in French-L2. Discriminant function analyses were conducted to examine if the Kindergarten L1 predictors could significantly discriminate between those students who were found to be at risk for reading and/or language learning in French-L2 in Grade 3. Early identification of risk for L2 reading and especially L2 language outcomes in immersion is unique and offers educators and clinicians in immersion and other L2 programs tools for providing early support for at-risk learners.

Bio:


Presenters:
Esther Geva, Professor, School and Clinical Child Psychology, Department of Applied Psychology & Human Development, OISE/University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
Christine Fraser, OISE/University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

Title: Early Cognitive, Reading, and Language Profiles of English Language Learners with Subsequent Reading Comprehension Difficulties

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Abstract: A developmental perspective is critical for understanding sources of typical and atypical reading comprehension difficulties among English language learners (ELLs). In this longitudinal study, we used the simple view of reading (SVR) as a conceptual framework for classifying ELLs (n=127) in grade 4 (in relation to the ELL sample) as typically developing or as at-risk for reading problems. Three groups of at-risk ELLs readers were identified: (1) poor decoders, (2) poor language comprehension, or (3) poor on both decoding and language comprehension. The prediction battery, assessed in grade 2, included linguistic, reading, and cognitive factors. Multinomial logistic regression examined the combination of grade 2 variables that predicted later (grade 4) reading comprehension (RC) group membership. A 7-predictor model that included nonverbal cognitive ability, naming speed, phonological awareness, receptive vocabulary, oral expression, word reading fluency, and reading comprehension in grade 2, predicted ELL reader subtype classification in grade 4. By grade 2, distinct at-risk cognitive, linguistic and early reading skills were associated with the grade 4 profiles, and different combinations of strengths and weaknesses on these early (grade 2) predictors characterize the grade 4 reading profiles, indicating that these profiles can be successfully identifiable in grade 2.
The discussion will focus on (a) implications of these results for avoiding under- and over-identification of ELLs with reading difficulties, (b) the importance of early identification of ELLs who struggle with their reading in comparison with their peers, and (c) the need to tailor interventions to different profiles.

Bio:


Presenter: Heikki Lyytinen, UNESCO professor/UNITWIN Chair on Inclusive Literacy Learning for All, Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä & Niilo Mäki Institute, Finland

Title: Preventive Training of Children At-Risk for Dyslexia: Associations with Features of the Orthography the Child is Learning to Read in

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Abstract: In the Jyväskylä Longitudinal study of Dyslexia (Lyytinen et al, 2007) developmental data from early age to puberty were collected from 200 children, half of whom were at familial risk for dyslexia. Results showed that highly accurate identification of children who would face difficulties in learning to read is possible years before reading difficulty sets in, by assessing early steps in learning basic reading skill involving the connections between spoken and written items. This dynamic assessment can be adapted and applied across orthographies, provided that the properties of orthographies are considered. Our Graphogame (GG) technology helps children at-risk for reading disability to develop reading skill before they experience failure. It has been successfully implemented in several writing systems, including transparent and nontransparent alphabets and Chinese. GG training entails repeated exposure to storing connections between spoken and written language in a game-like digital environment (see grapholearn.info). The implementation of the language-specific content should follow an optimal phonics approach in most orthographies. This has been our starting point in all our subsequent global efficacy studies which precede the use of the game outside of the research context. Successful efficacy studies in Finland provided the base for establishing the GraphoLearn service by means of public procurement. In Finland over 20 000 children are playing the game, mostly concentrating on the Fluency training version. Currently, investigations are running in four continents, involving over 20 countries and various orthographies. In this symposium, some interesting findings from our African and Asian studies will be illustrated, and implications for intervention principles will be discussed.

Bio:


Maria del Pilar Grazioso

Maria del Pilar Grazioso & Pragya Sharma

Focus of Lecture: Culture and Psychotherapy

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Nominating Division/Section:

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Affiliation: The TAOS Institute Universidad del Valle de Guatemala


Esther Greenglass

Esther Greenglass

Focus of Lecture: Economic Stress and Psychological Factors: Theoretical and Empirical Implications

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Affiliation: York University


Heather Hadjistavropoulos

Heather Hadjistavropoulos

Focus of Lecture: Improving Access to Mental Health Services via the Internet: Opportunities and Challenges

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Nominating Division/Section: Clinical; Psychologists in Hospitals & Health Centres: Rural & Northern

Abstract: Anxiety and depressive disorders are prevalent and disabling conditions that are frequently under-treated. Common barriers to receiving psychological services include limited time and mobility, concerns about privacy, as well as a desire to self-manage symptoms. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) has significant potential to improve patient access to evidenced-based care and to overcome treatment barriers. In ICBT, patients are typically assessed for suitability or diagnosis in some format (online, telephone, in person) and then if appropriate given access to self-help treatment materials via the Internet. ICBT is often accompanied by therapist support using secure emails or telephone calls, but at times blended with in person sessions. Research trials of ICBT have been very encouraging showing positive symptom improvement that is maintained over time and comparable to face-to-face CBT. Given the promising research findings, teams around the world have been involved in implementing ICBT in routine care. Implementation varies to some extent along a number of dimensions including implementation setting, funding, inclusion/exclusion criteria, screening and assessment procedures, nature of programs, as well as amount and type of therapist support. In this symposium, leaders in ICBT implementation from Australia (Nick Titov), Canada (Heather Hadjistavropoulos), Sweden (Viktor Kaldo), and the Netherlands (Heleen Riper) will describe their involvement/approach to ICBT implementation and also describe findings related to reach and effectiveness. Each presenter will also describe challenges and opportunities related to implementation. The presentations will be followed by a panel discussion during which the presenters will comment on similarities and differences in implementation approaches, reach and effectiveness, challenges and opportunities, including a discussion of potential benefits of international collaboration. The symposium is expected to foster a broader understanding of strategies for optimally implementing ICBT to improve patient access to mental health care.

Bio: Dr. Heather Hadjistavropoulos is a Professor of Psychology and Founder and Director of the Online Therapy Unit (onlinetherapyuser.ca) at the University of Regina. She has led or co-led over 37 research grants (with over $7 million CAD in grant funding) and published and presented widely on the assessment and treatment of anxiety and depression and on initiatives to improve health care delivery (over 140 publications). Since 2010, via the Online Therapy Unit, Dr. Hadjistavropoulos has focussed on researching and improving the reach, adoption, effectiveness, and implementation of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) in clinical practice. With more than $3 million CAD in funding from granting agencies and government contracts, this unit has: 1) overseen the development of a web application and policies and procedures for the delivery of ICBT; 2) collaborated with international experts to disseminate previously developed ICBT programs; 3) trained over 200 community providers and graduate students on how to use ICBT; and 4) as of Fall 2017, coordinated, monitored and evaluated the delivery of ICBT with over 2500 clients in 12 clinic settings. The Online Therapy Unit is having a substantial impact on mental health care in Saskatchewan and inspiring similar initiatives in other Canadian provinces.

Affiliation: University of Regina
Professor of Psychology & Director, Online Therapy Unit
Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapist, CACBT

Presenter: Nick Titov, Professor, Macquarie University, Australia

Title: TBC

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Presenter: Viktor Kaldo, Associate Professor, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

Title: TBC

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Presenter: Heleen Riper, Professor, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Title: TBC

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Zhi-Jin Hou

Zhi-Jin Hou

Focus of Lecture: Career Development Service in the 21st Century

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Nominating Division/Section: Counselling

Abstract: Career development issue is a big challenge for university students as well as employees in the 21 century. In this symposium, we aim to explore how to provide better career service to students and employees from diverse background, in order to facilitate their career development to cope with difficulties and challenges. Hsiu-Lan Tien will examine the similarities and differences of career services provided by Beijing Normal University and Taiwan Normal University using ecosystem model. Asami Senoo & Hana Suzuki will discuss how to provide better ways of career education that meets the needs of each individual in the changing Japanese society. Natalee Popadiuk will report the professional mentoring programs for international students in Canada. Laurent Sovet and his colleagues will elaborate the implementation of meaning-centered career intervention among college students within the French context. Jing Ni will address how internet use affects employees’ career development and implications for use internet to help people.

Bio: Zhi-Jin Hou is professor of counseling in the Faculty of Psychology at Beijing Normal University, China. She got her Ph.D. from Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2002. She is now a currently Non-US based chair in the international section of counseling psychology division in APA as well as a Liaison of China in counseling psychology division of IAAP. She is a board member of Clinical and Counseling Psychology committee of Chinese Psychological Society. She is the principle investigator of research project funded by the National Social Science Foundation of China. She was invited to convene an Invited Symposium at the International Congress of Psychology in 2016.

Affiliation: Beijing Normal University

Presenters:
Laurent Sovet, Paris Descartes University, France
Caroline Arnoux-Nicolas, National Conservatory of Applied Technology, France
Jean-Luc Bernaud, National Conservatory of Applied Technology, France

Title: Promoting Meaning-Centered Career Interventions in the 21st Century

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Abstract:
Background: In the last few decades, there has been a growing interest to examine career development through an existential lens. In a postmodern world, helping individuals to identify and to build meaningful life roles has become a crucial challenge for both practitioners and researchers (Bernaud, Lhotellier, Sovet, Arnoux-Nicolas, & Pelayo, 2015).
Methods: While meaning appears as a central aspect within life design interventions (Guichard, Bangali, Cohen-Scali, Pouyaud, & Robinet, 2017), several meaning-centered career interventions have been recently developed and tested (for a review, see Arnoux-Nicolas et al., 2017)
Action/Impact: The present contribution will introduce the implementation of meaning-centered career intervention among college students within the French context and present the preliminary evidences of its effectiveness
Conclusions: Meaning-centered activities within career interventions may be considered as a critical ingredient that could enhance both career development and psychological well-being and facilitate educational and career transitions.


Presenters:
Asami Senoo, Ritsumeikan University, Osaka, Japan
Hana Suzuki, Ritsumeikan University, Japan

Title: The Recent Situation of Career Education in Japanese Universities

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Abstract:
Background: Career education started in Japanese universities with the economic deterioration after the collapse of the bubble economy. In Japan, most companies have traditionally hired newly graduated university students. However, since the 2000’s, employment difficulties among young people have become social problems, and career education has been introduced.

Methods: In our research, we examined the types and the contents of career education conducted in Japanese universities. We obtained data from the results of government surveys, field work in university settings, and interview on career consultants.

Results: Career education is often provided by those who previously worked in temporary staffing business. and are qualified as career consultants; however, they only talk about how to survive in Japanese companies to over 200 students in one classroom. This way of providing career education is not adequate for each student.

Conclusion: Career education has focused on students’ adaptation to the unique Japanese labor market, because most people live a "standard life course", such as, "getting a job, a spouse, and children." However, it is crucial to provide career education and counseling which gears students towards changing labor market and life course.

Impact/action The job market and life styles are diversifying and there are many troubles that they could not foresee coming in the previous era. It is necessary for us to think about providing better ways of career education that meets the needs of each individual and of changing Japanese society.

Abstract summary: Career education started in Japanese universities with the economic deterioration after the collapse of the bubble economy. In Japan, most companies have traditionally hired newly graduated university students. However, since the 2000’s, employment difficulties among young people have become social problems, and career education has been introduced.
In our research, we examined the types and the contents of career education conducted in Japanese universities. We obtained data from the results of government surveys, field work in university settings, and interview on career consultants.
Career education is often provided by those who previously worked in temporary staffing business. and are qualified as career consultants; however, they only talk about how to survive in Japanese companies to over 200 students in one classroom. This way of providing career education is not adequate for each student.
Career education has focused on students’ adaptation to the unique Japanese labor market, because most people live a "standard life course", such as, "getting a job, a spouse, and children." However, it is crucial to provide career education and counseling which gears students towards changing labor market and life course.
The job market and life styles are diversifying and there are many troubles that they could not foresee coming in the previous era. It is necessary for us to think about providing better ways of career education that meets the needs of each individual and of changing Japanese society.


Presenter: Hsiu-Lan S. Tien, Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan

Title: A Systemic Approach of Career Services for College Students in Chinese Culture

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Abstract:
Background: Though Career Counseling is important for an individual during his/her life, few studies have examined the effects of career programs from the viewpoint of ecosystem. This study aimed to examine and compare the effects of career services provided by two universities from the viewpoint of ecosystem, and to provide feedbacks.

Methods: In Beijing Normal University and Taiwan Normal University, quantitative data (students’ perceptions of career services, concerning career difficulties, adaptability, efficacy, sense of hope and career needs) and qualitative data (the staff, advisors, and faculty members regarding career services provided by were interviewed) were collected.

Results: Similarities and differences between career services of the two universities were identified and differentiated. Base on the analysis, a systemic approach of career services which match the student’s needs was developed.

Action/Impact: This study helped to develop a computerized system to provide the college students with a more comprehensive career service system.

Conclusions: Quantitative data and qualitative data were collected and integrated to examine the effects of career services from the viewpoint of ecosystem and a systemic approach of career services which match the student’s needs was developed.

Abstract Summary: Career Counseling is an important issue for college students. However, little studies have been conducted to examine the effects of career programs from the viewpoint of ecosystem. The purpose of the current study is to examine the effects of career services provided by two universities (one in Beijin and the other one in Taiwan) from the viewpoint of ecosystem. The purpose was to provide feedbacks for universities to develop career services more effectively for the students.
In the literature part, we first reviewed studies on career needs perceived by the students. Indicators for the criterion variables such as career adaptability, career efficacy, career difficulties, and sense of hope were then discussed. For the method part, we first collect students’ perception of career services, more specifically, career difficulties, adaptability, efficacy, sense of hope and career needs were examined. In the next stage, we interview the staff, advisors, and faculty members regarding career services provided by the universities in Beijin Normal University and Taiwan Normal University. Similarities and differences were explored and compared. In the last stage, we integrate quantitative and qualitative data and develop a systemic approach of career services which match the student’s needs. If it is possible, we hope to develop a computerized system to provide the college students a more comprehensive career service system.


Presenters:
Jing NI, Faculty of Nursing, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang City, The People’s Republic of China
Xiao-peng Tian, Faculty of psychology, Beijing Normal University, The People’s Republic of China

Title: How Internet Use Affects Employees’ Career Development: Moderation Effects of Attitudes Toward Internet.

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Abstract: Background: With the rapid development of Internet, its impact on peoples’ attitudes and behaviors have attracted many researchers. However, the impact of Internet uses on career development has not been well studied and little relevant studies are conducted in China where lies a different Internet ecology.

Methods: In our plan, a total of 750 employees with various educational background and in various kinds of occupations will be recruited from Internet. Measures used in this study are all existing mature scales except for the Internet attitude scale which will be constructed for this study.

Action/Impact: This study can fill the gap between the theoretical effects of internet use on career development and its absence in existing empirical studies. By introducing the promising new media into this area, this study can further our understandings of one’s complex career development process in the internet era.

Conclusions: The data is in the process of collection. We expect that the Internet use would promote one’s self-efficacy and career adaptability, in which attitudes toward Internet plays the role of moderation.

Abstract Summary: This study is concerned with the career development of Chinese employees in the age of Internet. Since Internet has become an essential part of most people’s daily lives (CNNIC, 2017), some researchers put attentions to the impact of Internet uses on peoples’ attitudes and behaviors (such as subjective well-being; Kim & Kim, 2017). However, there are two limitations in this new area: first, the impact of Internet uses on career development has not been well studied; second, little relevant studies are conducted in China where lies a different Internet ecology.
To further this area, in the current study the relation between people’s Internet uses and their career development will be examined. Based on Career Construction Theory (Savickas, 2005, 2013), the relations among Internet use, attitudes toward Internet, self-efficacy, career adaptability and job satisfaction are explored and an integrative model is tested. Meanwhile, the effects of several demographic variables (e.g., gender, age, SES) on various variables as well as on the patterns of interrelations among variables in the proposed models are also examined.
In our plan, a total of 750 employees will be recruited from Internet. These participants should have different educational background (from middle school to doctors) and are engaged in various kinds of occupations (such as public sector, financial industry, E-commerce). Measures used in this study are all existing mature scales except for the Internet attitude scale which will be constructed for this study.


Presenter: Natalee E. Popadiuk, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada

Title: Supporting International Student Career Development: Insights from a Group of Canadian Business Mentors

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Abstract:
Background: International students are rarely the focus of the mentoring literature, despite the fact that mentoring can provide many positive outcomes to students. Also, little is known about the experiences of professionals who provide formal mentoring to international students. Thus, it is difficult to know how professional mentors navigate cultural differences.

Methods: Focused ethnography was used to study a particular sub-culture (professional business mentors and international student mentees) within a particular community and context (university mentoring program) in order to elicit specific knowledge and meaning about their experiences in relation to an identified problem (common and unique issues compared to domestic students).

Results: This study provides new knowledge about how professional business mentors perceive and work with international student mentees. Results highlighted that mentors’ cultural backgrounds, international work, and interest in diversity facilitated successful mentoring relationships. Most mentors went beyond obvious differences to connect with each student as an individual.

Action/Impact: Mentoring relationships with professional business people in the field support international students with insights about and connections to the local Canadian economy and hidden job market. Professional mentoring programs in university business schools provide a meaningful way to assist international students to transition from university-to-work in Canada post-graduation.

Conclusions: This study explored the experiences of professionals who mentor international university students in a Canadian business school. Mentors discussed the value added to their own lives through these relationships, as well as the importance of these connections to students. Professional mentoring programs would benefit international students in other academic disciplines.


Ana Maria Jacó-Vilela

Ana Maria Jacó-Vilela

Focus of Lecture: European psychologists emigrant to Latin America

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Nominating Division/Section: Division 18: History of Applied Psychology

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: Laboratório de História e Memória da Psicologia - Clio-Psyché
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Psicologia Social - UERJ
Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
Editora da Seção Clio-Psyché da revista Estudos e Pesquisas em Psicologia - www.revispsi.uerj.br
Vice-Presidente para a América do Sul da Sociedade Interamericana de Psicologia - https://sipsych.org/about/board-of-directors/
Presidente Eleita da Divisão 18 (History of Psychology) da International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) http://iaapsy.org/divisions/division18

Presenter: Rubén ARdila, Universidad Nacional de Colómbia

Title: TBC

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Presenter: Helio Carpintero, Academía Nacional de Psicología, Spain

Title: TBC

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Presenter: Ramón Leon, Universidad Ricardo Palma, Lima, Perú

Title: TBC

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Presenter: Annette Mulberger, Universidad Autònoma de Barcelona

Title: TBC

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Erich Kirchler

Erich Kirchler

Focus of Lecture: The Economic Psychology of Rule Compliance in Social Systems

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Nominating Division/Section: Economic Psychology

Abstract: In the Symposium "The Economic Psychology of Rule Compliance in Social Systems" five researchers wil present their studies on cooperation in social dilemma situations in general. They will focus predominantly on tax compliance as the result of a decision under risk. Reflections and empirical studies will be presented which test the effect of power measures such as audits and fines in case of non-cooperation, and trust building measures such as personal and social norms, distributive and procedural fairness and social representations of government and cooperation.

Bio: Erich Kirchler graduated in 1979 in psychology and human anthropology at the University of Vienna, Austria, and received his habilitation in psychology in 1989 from the University of Linz, Austria. Since 1992, he is professor of applied psychology (economic psychology) at the Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Austria. He was invited as guest professor at various European universities (e.g., France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland) and was visiting scholar at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA, and ANU, Canberra, Australia. He received a call for C4-professorship from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, and a call for C4-professorship from the University of Cologne, Germany. His research focuses on money management in the household, expenditures and credit use, tax behaviour and well-being. Most of the 400 scientific publications are dedicated to these research fields. Relevant books are „Wirtschaftspsychologie: Individuen, Gruppen, Märkte, Staat“ (Economic Psychology: Individuals, Groups, Markets, Nation-State) published by Hogrefe, Germany (2011; 4th edition); „Arbeits- und Organisationspsychologie“ (Work and Organisational Psychology) published by Facultas, Austria (2011, 3rd edition); „Conflict and Decision Making in Close Relationships“, published by Psychology Press, UK (2001), „The Economic Psychology of Tax Behaviour“, published by Cambridge University Press, UK (2007), and Economic Psychology (with Erik Hoelzl, Cambridge University Press, 2018).

Affiliation: University of Vienna, Austria


Patrick Leung

Patrick Leung

Focus of Lecture: The Design of Psychological Treatment: its Mechanisms, its Research Basis and its Efficacy/Effectiveness

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Nominating Division/Section:

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Affiliation: Professor & Department Chair, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Kyoko Noguchi

Kyoko Noguchi

Focus of Lecture: The next move for Health Psychology in Asia: How theories drive our power into practice

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Nominating Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: Professor of Health Psychology
Dean of Graduate School of Humanities and Intercultural Studies Bunka Gakuen University,
Tokyo, Japan


Laura Nota

Laura Nota

Focus of Lecture: Career aspect and interventions for a decent work and/for inclusive society

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Nominating Division/Section: Counselling

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Bio:

Affiliation: University of Padova, Italy


Keith Petrie

Keith Petrie

Focus of Lecture: Towards understanding and minimising the nocebo response

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Nominating Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: The nocebo effect is generally defined as the experience of adverse effects from an inert treatment or benign environmental exposure. The high rates of adverse effects caused by the nocebo effect has recently focused attention on interventions to minimize its impact. This symposium presents recent work from five labs around the world studying the nocebo effect. Kate MacKrill from the University of Auckland will present data from a recent study looking at what factors are associated with greater side effect reporting and perceptions of low drug efficacy in over 300 patients switched to a new brand of antidepressant. Rob Horne from University College London will present data from an experimental study showing changes in pain severity and symptomotolgy from a saline solution labelled with either neutral or therapeutic labelling. James Rubin from Kings College, London will present data from a recent double-blind randomised controlled trial showing that how medication side effect-risks are described affects whether people report side-effects after taking a tablet. Michael Witthöft from the University of Mainz, Germany will report on a study that tested whether information on the nocebo effect acted as a cognitive vaccine for idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields. Keith Petrie from the University of Auckland will present new data showing a nocebo intervention with colonoscopy patients reduced the reporting of side effects in patients with high levels of anxiety and baseline symptoms. The discussant for the symposium will be John Weinman from Kings College London.

Bio: Keith Petrie is Professor of Health Psychology at Auckland University Medical School. His research group does work on patients’ perceptions of illness, treatment adherence, as well as the placebo and nocebo response. Keith Petrie and his colleague John Weinman developed the Illness Perception Questionnaire which is widely used in health psychology and medical research. His recent awards include a Fulbright Fellowship, the Gluckman Medal and a Distinguished International Scholar Award from the Health Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association. He has been elected as a Fellow of the Association of Psychological Science and the Academy of Behavioural Medicine Research. In 2015 Professor Petrie was made a Fellow of the Royal Society and was the recipient of the Durie Medal, which is awarded to New Zealand’s pre-eminent social scientist.

Affiliation: University of Auckland, New Zealand

Presenter: Kate MacKrill, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Title: TBC

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Presenter: Rob Horne, University College London, United Kingdom

Title: TBC

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Presenter: G. James Rubin, Kings College London, United Kingdom

Title: TBC

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Presenter: Michael Witthoft, University of Mainz, Germany

Title: TBC

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Discussant: John Weinman, Kings College London, United Kingdom

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Catherine Ratelle

Catherine Ratelle

Focus of Lecture: Parenting and Self-Development

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Nominating Division/Section: Education, School & Instructional

Symposium Summary and Aims : This session presents research on the role of parents in their children’s development by considering psychological and academic development. Nested in a self-determination perspective, the four presentations examine parent-child interactions that support, or thwart, the satisfaction of children’s psychological needs. Using different methodologies (qualitative, experimental, longitudinal) and sampling children at different developmental stages (toddlers, children, adolescents), the results demonstrate the importance for parents to be autonomy supportive, involved, and structuring, as well as to refrain from putting pressure and coercing their child. These findings will then be discussed by a lead scholar on parenting and children’s academic and emotional development.

Bio:

Affiliation: Université Laval

Presentation 1: Geneviève A. Mageau, Mireille Joussemet, Chantal Paquin, Fanny Grenier - Université de Montréal, Canada
Richard Koestner - McGill University

Title: Promoting Optimal Parenting and Children’s Mental Health: Long Term Effects of The How-To Parenting Program

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Abstract: Joussemet, Mageau, and Koestner (2014) showed that the How-to parenting program (Faber & Mazlish, 1980) seems effective to induce positive change in parenting quality (i.e., structure, affiliation, autonomy support [AS]) and child mental health (less externalizing and internalizing problems). Although promising, this study did not evaluate whether these effects persist over time or if this program is beneficial to all. Yet, research on temperament shows that children with a higher negative emotionality (NE) have a differential susceptibility to parenting (Cassidy et al., 2011). This study thus aimed at (1) evaluating the program’s long-term impacts on parenting and child mental health, and (2) testing the moderating role of NE in these effects. Joussemet et al. (2014)’s sample (N = 93; 80% mothers) was contacted at six-month and one-year follow-ups and asked to complete follow-up assessments of parenting quality and child mental health. Parents also reported their child’s NE at T1. Multivariate multilevel analyses revealed improvements on all variables from pre to post-test that stabilized and persisted through the follow-up period; only AS skills decreased slightly from post-test to the six-month follow-up. Despite this slight decrease, all observed improvements in parenting and child mental health were significant six and twelve months after the program, compared to pretest. Finally, improvements in affiliation, AS skills, and child mental health were more pronounced for high NE children. These preliminary results support the potential effectiveness of the How-to program in improving parenting and child mental health, with accentuated effects for high NE children.


Presentation 2: Mireille Joussemet, Eftichia Andreadakis, Jessie-Ann Armour, Marilena Côté-Lecaldare, Geneviève A. Mageau & Julie C. Laurin - Université de Montréal

Title: Toddlers’ Autonomy: Examining How to Support it and Why it’s Difficult to Do So

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Abstract: The importance of supporting vs. thwarting children’s autonomy for their development and well-being is well-established but most research focused on school-aged children. The present talk presents recent studies pertaining to autonomy support (AS) toward toddlers. First, a qualitative content analysis of interviews conducted with eight daycare educators describes how they put AS into practice across many situations. Traditional elements (empathy, rationales, choices) were mentioned and other practices (pertaining to knowing toddlers, sensitivity, being a partner, mentoring and feedback) help widening the scope of AS (Côté-Lecaldare, Joussemet & Dufour, 2016). Second, a study conducted with parents of toddlers (N = 182) explored what practices they use when they ask their toddler to engage in an important yet uninteresting activity. Parents rated 26 practices, along with a classic parental AS scale. Results identify eight practices pertaining to empathy, rationales, informational communication and modeling and their use was positively related with toddlers' rule internalization (Andreadakis, Joussemet & Mageau, submitted). Moreover, mediation models show that toddlers’ negative affectivity was associated with greater parental stress, which in turn predicted lower parental use of these eight strategies (Andreadakis, Joussemet, Laurin & Mageau, submitted). Finally, the link between children’ negative affectivity (father reports) and parental lack of AS (mother reports) was observed in a longitudinal study. Specifically, 1 ½ year olds infants’ irritability (N = 2 223) predicted maternal coercion one year later, whereas infants’ fearfulness predicted overprotection (Armour, Joussemet, Kurdi, Tessier, Boivin & Tremblay, 2017), controlling for other key risk factors.


Presentation 3: Hanna Dumont - German Institute for International Educational Research, Germany

Title: Parental Homework Involvement and Students’ Academic Development: Opportunities and Risks

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Abstract: Homework is the setting in which home and school intersect most closely and, thus, has great potential to bridge the two main contexts in which children’s learning takes place. However, empirical research indicates that parental homework involvement may not always be a good thing. Based on four longitudinal large-scale survey and assessment studies from Germany and Switzerland, in which secondary school students were asked about their parents’ involvement in their homework process, I will present findings on opportunities and risks of parental homework involvement regarding its impact on students’ academic development. The studies show that frequent help of parents is not necessarily beneficial for students. Only when parents’ involvement was characterized by emotional and autonomy support, students showed a positive academic development. In contrast, when parents were intrusive and controlling during the homework process, more conflict between students and parents were reported and students showed lower academic achievement and lower motivation. Furthermore, the empirical findings revealed that parental involvement did not only affect students, but was also affect by students’ characteristics—more than by characteristics of the parents themselves. Taken together, it is the quality of parental homework involvement that matters, not its quantity. Therefore, when aiming to increase parental homework involvement, parents need to be offered guidance on how to assist their children with homework in order for it to live up to its potential.


Presentation 4:Catherine F. Ratelle, Stéphane Duchesne, Frédéric Guay, Geneviève Boisclair Châteauvert - Université Laval

Title: Comparing the Contribution of Overall Structure and its Specific Dimensions for Competence-Related Outcomes: A Bifactor Model

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Abstract: Parental structure entails making children’s environment predictable, which supports the satisfaction of their need for competence. Recently, researchers have proposed a multidimensional conceptualization of parental. Because past studies typically assessed one or two of these dimensions, we do not know how useful adding other dimensions is for predicting competence-related outcomes. This one-year prospective study tested if including all dimensions of parental structure improved the prediction of students’ competence-related outcomes. The sample included 378 adolescents (53% girls) who completed a survey assessing parental structure (Time 1) and competence-related outcomes (academic achievement and adjustment, vocational efficacy and self-concept; Time 2). Using exploratory structural equation modeling, we tested a bifactorial model of parental structure, which allowed comparing within a single model the contribution of global structure to that of its underlying dimensions. Hence, global structure explained the largest share of variance in academic achievement, adjustment, self-efficacy, and identity. Results supported the utility of considering all indicators of parental structure, without needing to discriminate among those relating to a specific dimension. Indeed, the global factor was a stronger predictor of outcomes, compared to specific dimensions, and none of the dimensions systematically outperformed global structure across all outcomes. This research demonstrated that students’ competence-related outcomes are better predicted from parental structure when all six dimensions are assessed. Future research would therefore benefit from increasing questionnaire length to map on all dimensions of structure to more adequately determine how to support children’s need for competence and its consequences.


Discussant: Eva M. Pomerantz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Campaign, USA


Gertraud Stadler

Gertraud Stadler

Focus of Lecture: TBD

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Nominating Division/Section: Div 8: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: University of Aberdeen, UK


Zhao, Jiaying

Richard Young

Focus of Lecture: Human Action and the Future of Applied Psychology

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Nominating Division/Section: Div 16: Counselling

Symposium overview: Human action in its various iterations is the focus of many research questions and practices in psychology generally, including, for example, cognitive science and cultural psychology. The understandings generated in these and other fields of psychology have applications for areas of applied psychology. Conversely, applied psychology because of its grounding in human action can speak directly to complexity that psychology addresses. Human action represents the epitome of the theme of the congress, that is, the thriving partnership between science and practice.

In this symposium, the presenters address human action and action theory as an alternative paradigm that has and will have relevance in a variety of areas of applied psychology.

Catherine Raeff argues for a conceptualization of human action that encompasses the complexity of what people do and identifies human action as the unit of analysis in psychological research, including applied psychological research. The four subsequent presenters discuss the place of human action in specific areas of applied psychology.

Mary Sue Richardson takes the position that human action, particularly the concept of agentic action, is central to the field of vocational psychology. She grounds her argument on changing social structures, social constructionism, and narrative theory all of which contribute to understanding and influencing how people engage in their work lives.

Valérie Cohen-Scali takes the argument about the place human action in vocational psychology a step further by addressing the dialogical and conversation actions of adults in mid-career transition. Her research addresses the functionality of these actions in the process of goal-directed career transition. These actions serve a variety of functions not the least of which is the agency they enact in people’s lives.

José Domene also addresses the joint action between people as a manifestation of human action. In this case, he focuses on the field of relationships, specifically romantic relationships. He reports on current research involving young adults in romantic relationships from the perspective of their joint goal-directed projects.

Ladislav Valach reports on the development and implementation of a suicide prevention procedure that has at its core an understanding of suicide processes as goal-directed action. In this presentation, Dr. Valach extends the understanding of action to include mid-term projects and long-term career and speaks to the merits for research and practice of understanding suicide processes as goal-directed action.

Bio:

Affiliation: University of British Columbia

Presenter: Catherine Raeff, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA

Title: Conceptualizing the Complexities of Human Action

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Abstract: Human beings are complex creatures who live complex lives amidst complex circumstances. Complexity is evident in the dynamics, variability, and individuality of what people do as they engage in the daily life settings of applied psychology. Some of this complexity is obfuscated by conventional psychology practices, including fragmenting, objectifying, and aggregating. This presentation focuses on articulating an integrative conceptualization of human action as a unit of analysis for psychology that encompasses the complexity of what people do. Using systems theory as a meta-theoretical frame, the current action perspective starts from the premise that people act in relation to others, and that such action is made up of multiple and interrelated constituent processes. It posits that action is constituted by simultaneously occurring and interrelated individual, social, cultural, bodily, and environmental processes. Action is further conceptualized in terms of psychological processes (e.g., perceiving, thinking, feeling, interacting, self/identity), and developmental processes. This conceptualization provides an antidote to conventional psychology’s fragmenting practices with a unit of analysis that encompasses varied domains of functioning and processes at the same time, rather than treating them independently. It provides an antidote to objectifying by embracing subjective experience. It provides an alternative to aggregating practices by addressing how general human processes are played out in individualized ways, as well as in culturally particular ways. This action perspective provides a theoretical framework that is relevant to psychology in general, as well for thinking systematically about varied complex and vexing human issues that are confronted in applied settings.

Bio:


Presenter: Mary Sue Richardson, New York University, USA

Title: Vocational Psychology

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Abstract: The position taken in this paper is that human action (agentic action) is a construct that is central to the future of vocational psychology. Vocational psychology, which began with an emphasis on theory, research, and practice aimed at helping people make vocational or career (market work) choices, has evolved over time to a focus on helping people take agentic action in their lives. Agentic action is essentially about helping people engage in action characterized by some sense of conscious purpose to pursue aims in response to life circumstances. Rather than choosing, the emphasis is on taking action in social contexts. This theoretical shift in emphasis is grounded first of all, in the realities of radical changes occurring in contemporary social structures. Second, it is located in social constructionism, especially contextualism, that envisions human actors as whole persons situated in interdependent social contexts, not as persons with a psychologized career self interfacing primarily with the occupational structure. Third, this theoretical orientation is steeped in narrative theory that conceives of human beings as located fundamentally in time, in a present in which the future is always emerging through agentic action as the stories of the past are constructed. A focus on agentic action in vocational psychology positions vocational psychology as a field that aims to help people move forward in their lives in meaningful and empowering ways. Within this larger and more holistic context, the role of work, both paid market work and unpaid care work, is significant.

Bio:


Presenter: Valérie Cohen-Scali, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Paris, France

Title: Dialogue and conversation actions during midcareer transitions

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Abstract: Career transitions are generally important changes in the lifestyle of individuals. Professional activities are interrupted and new forms of actions might take place. A set of agentic actions are developed during these periods, particularly dialogues and conversations. The aim of this presentation is to identify the main dialogue and conversation actions implemented by adults in career reconversion and their role on identity and career path construction. A study has been undertaken to explore the types of relational actions developed by people who want to change career. Semi-structured interviews with 12 executives, coming from private companies and willing to work in the Social and Solidarity Economy, have been conducted. The data have been analyzed using thematic content analysis. The results underline that these executives renew their relationships and their social network and develop many dialogue and conversation actions in formal and informal contexts. These dialogues and conversational activities appear to have several functions: search for information, request for explanation, interpretation of one’s situation, question. They suggest that individuals in midcareer transition try to implement deliberation times where several interpretations of their situation can be confronted. The observations show that mid- career transitions are specific career change periods where people are strongly active in directing direct their lives and trying to adjust their living contexts to their new expectations. Career counselors should be able to favor the development of dialogue and conversation actions with a variety of interlocutors, while facilitating the client’s reflection on these actions.

Bio:


Presenter: José F. Domene, University of New Brunswick, Canada

Title: Applied Psychology Research and Practice in the Domain of Romantic Relationships: The Role of Action

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Abstract: Theories of human action hold excellent potential for future research and practice in many areas of applied psychology, including romantic relationships. Focusing primarily on contextual action theory (CAT), this presentation describes current research exploring romantic partners’ communication and interactional patterns and potential ways to incorporate a focus on action in applied psychology practice with couples. Within CAT, actions are defined as intentional, individual or joint processes that are oriented towards achieving a desired end state or goal. Action is also viewed as constructed through language and social representation; that is, human action is embedded within a social context that must be attended to in understanding action. CAT emphasizes the importance of joint actions, which involve pairs or groups of persons working together to achieve mutual goals. Therefore, it is ideally suited for examining romantic relationships. Current CAT research has delineated ways that emerging adult couples negotiate and work together to pursue relationship goals (e.g., relocating, having children, work-life balance), and the power dynamics that undergird young couples interactions. Building on this initial work, in the future there is strong potential to extend this body of research to romantic relationships across the lifespan, as well as to explore couples’ actions in pursuit of goals in other life domains. Action can also serve as the central focus of counselling, as delinated in the CAT-informed approach proposed by Young, Domene, and Valach (2012). As will be explained in the presentation, this approach has several potential benefits for practitioners engaged in relationship counselling.

Bio:


Presenter: Ladislav Valach, Private practice, Berne, Switzerland

Title: Action, Action Theory and Suicide Prevention

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Abstract: In this presentation, human action, including embodied cognition and enminded behaviour, is presented as an important way as well as a starting point to address applied issues in psychology. This includes short term and long term, conscious and unconscious, premeditated and spontaneous, rational and affective processes. We propose that contextual action theory can provide a framework for the conceptualization and treatment of applied issues in terms of goal-directed action. Using contextual action theory to examine suicide processes, a suicide prevention procedure was developed for patients who had attempted suicide. This procedure consists of establishing a joint suicide preventive project, developing a narrative, working on the suicide and suicide preventive actions in a self-confrontation interview, developing implementation intention and providing a regular reminder of the joint suicide preventive action. Results indicate that it was possible to reduce rates of repeated suicide attempt by more than other known published interventions achieved (55 treated patients, 5 (8.3%) re-attempts vs. 43 patients in the control group, 16 re-attempts (26.7%)) (Gysin-Maillart et al., 2016; Michel, Valach, & Gysin-Maillart, 2017). We conclude that seeing suicide processes as goal-directed actions, projects and careers helps in devising and conducting successful suicide prevention. The suicide preventive procedure has been implemented in the suicide crisis centre in the psychiatric outpatient clinic of the University Berne as the standard procedure.

Bio:


Tomasz Zaleskiewicz & Agata Gasiorowska

Tomasz Zaleskiewicz & Agata Gasiorowska

Focus of Lecture: The Psychological Consequences of Money

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Nominating Division/Section: Division 9: Economic Psychology

Abstract: This symposium consists of five papers that capture different psychological aspects of money usage and money attitudes. The research that will be presented shows that money, in addition to its economic functions, also has emotional and social meanings. For example, money can evoke positive and negative feelings, activate innate proclivities and motivations, compensate for the sense of control, and change the norms within interpersonal relations.
The first paper (by Van Raaij & Antonides) focuses on the issue of money usage by households. The authors will provide quantitative information about how couples handle their household finances in terms of information seeking, decision making, making payments, saving, life and financial goals to be achieved, mental budgeting, and degree of consensus in decision making. The next two papers (by Tang & the Money Ethic Research International Team, and by Zhao & Tang) discuss the concepts of love of money and monetary intelligence and show how they are linked to investment behaviors, corruption, entrepreneurship and creativity. Interestingly, both papers will present results that were collected around the world and reveal many cross-cultural effects. The fourth paper (by Kuzminska, Gasiorowska, Zaleskiewicz, & Vohs) will demonstrate how the exposure of money impacts people’s proneness to trust others. The authors will show that being exposed to money increases transaction-oriented trust (related to market mode), but lowers communal trust (related to communal mode and thus conflicting with exchange relationships). Finally, the fifth paper by Kesebir, Zaleskiewicz, & Gasiorowska focuses on the idea of the symbolic value of money. It will show that saving money can buffer death anxiety and constitute a more effective buffer than spending money. The authors found in a series of experiments that saving can relieve future-related anxiety and provide people with a sense of control over their fate, thereby rendering death thoughts less threatening.

Bio:

Affiliation: Professor of Psychology, Head of the Center for Research in Economic Behavior
SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Wroclaw Faculty of Psychology
Associate Editor - Journal of Economic Psychology
President Elect, Division of Economic Psychology IAAP - International Association of Applied Psychology


Zhao, Jiaying

Zhao, Jiaying

Focus of Lecture: Using psychological science to address environmental sustainability challenges

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Nominating Division/Section: Environmental

Abstract:

Bio: Jiaying Zhao is the Canada Research Chair (t2) in Behavioural Sustainability, and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia. She received her PhD in cognitive psychology from Princeton University in 2013. She is the principal investigator of the Behavioural Sustainability Lab at UBC. Her research uses psychological principles to design behavioural solutions to address sustainability challenges. Specifically, she examines how resource scarcity impacts human cognition and behaviour and what interventions are effective at alleviating cognitive burdens in the poor; how to reduce water and energy consumption, encourage recycling and composting behavior, promote responsible carsharing behaviour, and engage the public on biodiversity conservation; and how attentional biases drive belief polarization about climate change.

Affiliation: University of British Columbia

Presenter: Jiaying Zhao, University of British Columbia, Canada

Title: Motivated attention in the perception and action of climate change

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Abstract: Despite the overwhelming scientific evidence, many people still remain skeptical about climate change and refuse to take actions to mitigate the adverse impacts of climate change. Here we propose a motivated attention framework to explain public skepticism and inaction. We propose that personal motivations (e.g., political orientation) shape attention to climate change information, which alters the perception of climate evidence and shifts subsequent actions to mitigate climate change. In Study 1 (N=700), participants viewed a graph representing the annual global temperature change from 1880 to 2014 and estimated the average temperature change. We found that participants gave a higher estimate when the data were framed as global temperature than when the temperature label was removed (in a neutral frame). Furthermore, political orientation predicted participants’ estimation in that conservatives under-estimated the temperature change compared to liberals. In Study 2 (N=214), we eyetracked participants’ gaze when they viewed the temperature graph, and found that liberals focused more on the increasing phase of the curve, which was associated with a higher estimation of the global temperature change. However, conservatives focused more on the flat phase of the curve, which was associated with a lower temperature estimation. In Study 3 (N=104), we found that the total amount of gaze fixations of liberal participants on the graph predicted their willingness to donate to environmental organizations and their donation amount. These results provide initial evidence for the motivated attention framework, highlighting an attentional divide between liberals and conservatives in the perception of climate data, which can further explain their polarizing beliefs about climate change, as well as the actions these individuals take to address climate change. The current findings have important implications for the visualization of climate data and communication of climate science to different socio-political groups.

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Presenter: Reuven Sussman, The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), USA

Title: Reconsidering the theory of planned behavior: A field study

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Abstract: The theory of planned behaviour proposes that behaviour is predicted by behavioural intention which is, in turn, predicted by attitudes toward the behaviour, subjective norms regarding the behaviour and perceived control over the behaviour. Implied within this theory is that each of the three base components (attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control) influences intentions. However, despite being one of the most widely used theories in social psychology, few studies have investigated this basic premise. This presentation will describe the third of three studies investigating this potential reverse-causal sequence. The first was correlational, the second was a lab-based experiment, and the third was a quasi-experimental field study. Study 3 was a field study in which chemistry lab users who were exposed to an intervention that targeted behavioural intentions subsequently perceived more positive subjective norms (one aspect of subjective norms was changed). Over the course of nearly two years, use of the 55 fume hoods in the chemistry building were automatically monitored, and use of the set back switch was logged. Using pre/post surveys and setback switch monitoring in a treatment and control group, we found that fume hood use and perceived social norms regarding fume hood use changed after our intervention. Together, the three studies demonstrate that a reverse-causal relation between intentions and base components is plausible and, thus, the theory of planned behaviour should be modified to include a reciprocal relation between these constructs.

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Presenter: Loraine Lavallee, University of Northern British Columbia, Canada

Title: Getting to sustainable lifestyles by understanding key social-psychological aspects of collective problems

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Abstract: Two aspects of collective environmental problems create significant barriers to sustainable living: the complex, globalized economic system in which we live and the collective nature of these problems. Three studies illustrate the social-psychological barriers created by these aspects of environmental problems. In a community study on sustainable landscaping practices, community residents (N = 519, MAge = 51) stated that environmental conservation should be the highest priority with landscaping, but conservation was residents’ lowest priority on their yards. Lack of understanding about sustainable landscaping techniques and practices was cited as the main barrier. To illustrate the obstacles individuals face when trying to understand the environmental impact of their behaviour, Study 2, a case study of one environmentalist’s daily food consumption, demonstrated that no product the individual consumed could be identified as definitely environmentally sustainable. For 64% of the products, the impact on environmental criteria could not be determined. Our complex, economic system obscures individuals’ environmental impact and therefore limits individuals’ ability to regulate behaviour around sustainability goals. Even if the sustainable path was easily identifiable, collective inertia can create another barrier. A commons dilemma study (Study 3) demonstrated that when the majority in a collective were over-harvesting and therefore ruining the ability of the group to achieve the long-term environmental objective, the individual’s willingness to conserve declined. Some market-based approaches to environmental conservation (e.g., individual cap and trade) can address a broader range of these barriers than others (e.g., carbon taxes, voluntary offsets).

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Presenter: Elizabeth (Lisa) Nisbet, Trent University, Canada

Title: Healthy Parks and Healthy People: The environmental and human health benefits of challenging citizens to spend time outdoors, connecting with nature

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Abstract: Natural environments such as parks can provide important physical and psychological well-being benefits. Encouraging people to visit parks and spend time in nature may also promote feelings of connectedness and concern for the natural environment. Results from Ontario Parks’ Healthy Parks Healthy People 30x30 Nature Challenge indicate being active or relaxing in nature can improve perceptions of physical and mental health, reduce stress, and increase positive mood and vitality. Research on the consequences of disconnection from nature, and the importance of regular nature contact, are discussed in terms of the implications for educators, policy makers, and health care providers.

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Presenter: Sander van der Linden, University of Cambridge, UK

Title: Saving the planet because it feels good: The role of warm-glow in shaping green behavior

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Abstract: Policies often rely on extrinsic economic incentives. Behavioral research suggests that external incentives are costly, difficult to maintain, and can undermine people’s intrinsic motivation to help. Accordingly, it is pivotal to gain a better understanding of the intrinsic motivational factors that lead people to help the environment in the long-term. A case is made for a much stronger consideration of the role of intrinsic human motivation in policy-making and design, and to encourage the use of extrinsic incentives that do not undermine people’s self-determined motivation to help the environment. I will draw on a series of different studies that rely on complementary methodologies, from quasi-field experiments using objective energy consumption (behavioral measures) to controlled laboratory studies to longitudinal panel data. Various analyses were conducted, from interrupted time-series analysis (visualizing behavioral trends) to structural equation modelling (SEM) and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for experimental design. Results show a complex relationship between norms and behavior. Intrinsic motivation consistently relates to sustainable behavior but is difficult to cultivate, especially for high-impact behavior changes. The role of intrinsic motivation has been severely neglected in policy-making compared to the use of extrinsic incentives. In comparison, intrinsically-motivated sustainable behavior can sustain itself at low cost but is more difficult to promote and cultivate. In several studies I highlight the potential of intrinsic motivation to shape pro-environmental behavior.

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